The Open Science Guide of Guides | Zenodo

“In this compendium, we compile Open Science guides with their specific features and fields of application. The book was made as part of a student seminar at the Hannover University of Applied Sciences and Arts in close cooperation with the TIB Open Science Lab as part of TIB Book Sprints R&D….”

Opening up Educational Practices through Faculty, Librarian, and Student Collaboration in OER Creation: Moving from Labor-intensive to Supervisory Involvement | Partnership: The Canadian Journal of Library and Information Practice and Research

Abstract:  This article presents a case study for transitioning library-led open-educational resources (OER) initiatives away from labor-intensive activities to a model where library personnel focus on project management responsibilities. This shift from labour-intensive activities, such as workshops and training sessions, led to more collaborative partnerships with faculty and students to produce OER projects. In particular, we focus on labour implications for the various stakeholders involved and the sustainability of these initiatives. We describe several initiatives undertaken by the Ohio University Libraries to encourage open educational resource adoptions and projects, including a grant-funded initiative to provide support services for faculty creating OER. That funding, which was awarded to enhance undergraduate education, has been used to support the development of five OER projects that have directly involved students in the creation of those materials. We provide an overview of the various ways in which students have become involved in OER creation in partnership with faculty and librarians and discuss the impact these partnerships have had on student-faculty-librarian relationships and student engagement. Among these projects are an Hispanic linguistics open textbook created using only student-authored texts, student-generated test banks to accompany existing OER materials for a large-enrollment art history course, and several other projects in which hired student assistants are helping faculty to develop content for open textbooks. This article helps to address a gap in the literature by providing transparency regarding the personnel, costs, and workflow for Ohio University Libraries’ OER initiatives and addressing potential areas of concern surrounding student labour. 

 

PsyArXiv Preprints | Nudging Open Science

Abstract:  In this article, we provide a toolbox of resources and nudges for those who are interested in advancing open scientific practice. Open Science encompasses a range of behaviours that aim to include the transparency of scientific research and how widely it is communicated. The paper is divided into seven sections, each dealing with a different stakeholder in the world of research (researchers, students, departments and faculties, universities, academic libraries, journals, and funders). With two frameworks in mind — EAST and the Pyramid of Culture Change — we describe the influences and incentives that sway behaviour for each of these stakeholders, we outline changes that can foster Open Science, and suggest actions and resources for individuals to nudge these changes. In isolation, a small shift in one person’s behaviour may appear to make little difference, but when combined, these small shifts can lead to radical changes in culture. We offer this toolbox to assist individuals and institutions in cultivating a more open research culture.

 

SMILE: Sustaining Medical Education in A Lockdown Environment. Student Perceptions of a Free Online Access Medical Education Platform as An Adjunct to The Traditional Undergraduate Curriculum During Lockdown | British Journal of Surgery | Oxford Academic

Abstract:  Introduction

The coronavirus outbreak has had significant impact on medical students worldwide. SMILE is a free online access medical education (FOAMEd) platform. SMILE delivered 200 lectures during lockdown with up to 1400 students per session from UK medical schools and 33 abroad. Here we discuss student perceptions to SMILE during lockdown

Method

A survey was used to collect information from students who had utilised the platform during lockdown. This examined access to learning, impact on mental health during lockdown and the differences between FOAMed and more traditional based campus lecture-based learning.

Results

1306 students responded to the survey. The majority of students were concerned regarding their training during lockdown, with 71% reporting an impact on their stress levels and 44% reporting a negative impact on mental health.

On average students attended 4.3hours of teaching put on by their university per week, vs 7.9hours by SMILE.

Positives included anonymity, making 80% more likely to both ask and answer questions, the informal approach, ease of access and enthusiastic teachers. Negatives included time differences and technical issues.

Conclusions

Lockdown provided challenges in medical education, which platforms like SMILE addressed. Our experiences highlighted many positive outcomes of online medical education that may be applicable to other educators.

WINNERS OF THE LATIN AMERICAN OPEN ACCESS ESSAY COMPETITION 2020

“The Open Access 2020 week was held with the theme “Openness with Purpose”, which provided the appropriate framework for AmeliCA, UNESCO, Redalyc and CLACSO to organize the Latin American Open Access Essay Competition 2020 with the theme “Open with Purpose: Taking Action to Build Structural Equity and Inclusion”, aimed at young Latin American researchers and students. The competition rules were published on September 30, 2020 and essays were received until December 28, 2020….”

 

DEI Project in Latin America: Plan and preliminary findings | Global OER Graduate Network (GO-GN)

“DEI Project in Latin America: Plan and preliminary findings” by Carina Bossu and Viviane Vladimirschi was presented at the 2 March 2021 GO-GN webinar. Blog posts:

Proyecto DEI en Latinoamérica: Plan y resultados preliminares: http://go-gn.net/webinars/proyecto-dei-en-latinoamerica-plan-y-resultados-preliminares/
Projeto DEI na América Latina–Plano e dados preliminares: http://go-gn.net/webinars/projeto-dei-na-america-latina-plano-e-dados-preliminares/
DEI Project in Latin America: Plan and preliminary findings: http://go-gn.net/webinars/dei-project-in-latin-america-plan-and-preliminary-findings/

DEI Project in Latin America: Plan and preliminary findings | Global OER Graduate Network (GO-GN)

“DEI Project in Latin America: Plan and preliminary findings” by Carina Bossu and Viviane Vladimirschi was presented at the 2 March 2021 GO-GN webinar. Blog posts:

Proyecto DEI en Latinoamérica: Plan y resultados preliminares: http://go-gn.net/webinars/proyecto-dei-en-latinoamerica-plan-y-resultados-preliminares/
Projeto DEI na América Latina–Plano e dados preliminares: http://go-gn.net/webinars/projeto-dei-na-america-latina-plano-e-dados-preliminares/
DEI Project in Latin America: Plan and preliminary findings: http://go-gn.net/webinars/dei-project-in-latin-america-plan-and-preliminary-findings/

University Libraries launches open-access Penn State Journal of Medicine | Penn State University

“Penn State University Libraries’ Open Publishing unit recently published the first issue of the Penn State Journal of Medicine. All of the content in the peer-reviewed journal is edited by medical students in the Penn State College of Medicine and published open access, meaning it is freely available under a Creative Commons license.

The journal’s mission is to provide “a means for publication of clinical and medical-based research completed by students enrolled at the Penn State College of Medicine,” as well as “an avenue for students to display their work on a peer-reviewed platform (and receive) the feedback they need to improve the quality of their work in a learning environment,” according to its mission statement….”

‘Price gouging from Covid’: student ebooks costing up to 500% more than in print | Higher education | The Guardian

“Librarians at UK universities say students’ reading lists for this term are being torn up because of publishers’ “eye-watering” increases to ebook prices, and some students are now reading what is available or affordable, rather than what their tutors think is best for their course.

With thousands of students studying in their bedrooms at home because of the pandemic, providing access to textbooks and research books online has become crucial. However, librarians say academic publishers are failing to offer electronic versions of many books, seen as critical to degree courses during the pandemic. And, they say, universities frequently cannot afford to buy the ebooks available, for which they can be charged more than five times as much as the printed version, often running into hundreds of pounds a copy, sometimes for one user at a time.

 

Nearly 3,000 librarians, academics and students have now signed an open letter calling for a public investigation into the “unaffordable, unsustainable and inaccessible” academic ebook market….”