Flowcite Integrates Smart Citations from Scite to Speed Up Research – Flowcite

“Flowcite – a German-based service providing an all-in-one  platform for academic research, writing, editing, and publishing –partners  up with Brooklyn-based scite.ai to offer quick source evaluation for its users to ensure quality, improve the relevance of results, and thus save time on research….”

MAG replacement update: meet OpenAlex! – OurResearch blog

“Last month, we announced that we’re launching a replacement for Microsoft Academic Graph (MAG) this December–just before MAG itself will be discontinued.  We’ve heard from a lot of current MAG users since then. All of them have offered their support and encouragement (which we really appreciate), and all have also all been curious to learn more. So: here’s more! It’s a snapshot of what we know right now.  As the project progresses, we’ll have more details to share, keeping everyone as up-to-date as we can….”

Open Science in Kenya: Where Are We? | Research Metrics and Analytics

“According to the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), Open Science is the movement to make scientific research and data accessible to all. It has great potential for advancing science. At its core, it includes (but is not limited to) open access, open data, and open research. Some of the associated advantages are promoting collaboration, sharing and reproducibility in research, and preventing the reinvention of the wheel, thus saving resources. As research becomes more globalized and its output grows exponentially, especially in data, the need for open scientific research practices is more evident — the future of modern science. This has resulted in a concerted global interest in open science uptake. Even so, barriers still exist. The formal training curriculum in most, if not all, universities in Kenya does not equip students with the knowledge and tools to subsequently practice open science in their research. Therefore, to work openly and collaboratively, there is a need for awareness and training in the use of open science tools. These have been neglected, especially in most developing countries, and remain barriers to the cause. Moreover, there is scanty research on the state of affairs regarding the practice and/or adoption of open science. Thus, we developed, through the OpenScienceKE framework, a model to narrow the gap. A sensitize-train-hack-collaborate model was applied in Nairobi, the economic and administrative capital of Kenya. Using the model, we sensitized through seminars, trained on the use of tools through workshops, applied the skills learned in training through hackathons to collaboratively answer the question on the state of open science in Kenya. While the former parts of the model had 20–50 participants, the latter part mainly involved participants with a bioinformatics background, leveraging their advanced computational skills. This model resulted in an open resource that researchers can use to publish as open access cost-effectively. Moreover, we observed a growing interest in open science practices in Kenya through literature search and data mining and that lack of awareness and skills may still hinder the adoption and practice of open science. Furthermore, at the time of the analyses, we surprisingly found that out of the 20,069 papers downloaded from BioRXiv, only 18 had Kenyan authors, a majority of which are international (16) collaborations. This may suggest poor uptake of the use of preprints among Kenyan researchers. The findings in this study highlight the state of open science in Kenya and challenges facing its adoption and practice while bringing forth possible areas for primary consideration in the campaign toward open science. It also proposes a model (sensitize-train-hack-collaborate model) that may be adopted by researchers, funders and other proponents of open science to address some of the challenges faced in promoting its adoption in Kenya….”

 

Dr. Trevor Owens Wins 2021 Core/OCLC Kilgour Research Award | News and Press Center

“Dr. Trevor Owens has been selected as the recipient of the 2021 Frederick G. Kilgour Award for Research in Library and Information Technology, sponsored by OCLC and Core: Leadership, Infrastructure, Futures. He is the Head of Digital Content Management at The Library of Congress.

The Kilgour Award honors research relevant to the development of information technologies, especially work which shows promise of having a positive and substantive impact on any aspect(s) of the publication, storage, retrieval and dissemination of information, or the processes by which information and data are manipulated and managed. It recognizes a body of work probably spanning years, if not the majority of a career. The winner receives $2,000, and a citation.

Owens is being recognized for his work on the Zotero project, a National Endowment for the Humanities-funded study on the potential for text mining and data visualization tools for historical scholarship, the Viewshare collection visualization platform, and how he is reimagining the Library of Congress as a platform for the acquisition, preservation, and dissemination of digital materials of all types. He has also written several essential titles, including Designing Online Communities: How Designers, Developers, Community Managers, and Software Structure Discourse and Knowledge Production on the Web and The Theory and Craft of Digital Preservation: An Introduction, as well as dozens of journal articles, book chapters, conference proceedings, keynote presentations, and invited lectures. Through his pioneering work and leadership, he has helped change the understanding of information technology and its transformative application to libraries, especially around digital materials and strategies for access to, preservation of, and tools for maximizing use of them….”

Open Science nonprofit OurResearch receives $4.5M grant from Arcadia Fund – OurResearch blog

“The grant, which follows an 2018 award for $850,000, will help expand two existing open-source software projects, as well as support the launch of two new ones:

Unpaywall, launched in 2017, has become the world’s most-used index of Open Access (OA) scholarly papers. The free Unpaywall extension has 400,000 active users, and its underlying database powers OA-related features in dozens of other tools including Web of Science, Scopus, and the European Open Science Monitor. All Unpaywall data is free and open.
Unsub is an analytics dashboard that helps academic libraries cancel their large journal subscriptions, freeing up money for OA publishing. Launched in late 2019, Unsub is now used by over 500 major libraries in the US and worldwide, including the national library consortia of Canada, Australia, Greece, Hong Kong, and the UK. 
JournalsDB will be a free and open database of scholarly journals. This resource will gather a wide range of data on tens of thousands of journals, emphasizing coverage of emerging open venues. 
OpenAlex will be a free and open bibliographic database, cataloging papers, authors, affiliations, citations, and journals. Inspired by the ancient Library of Alexandria, OpenAlex will strive to create a comprehensive map of the global scholarly conversation.  In a recent blog post, the team announced that OpenAlex will be released in time to serve as a replacement for Microsoft Academic Graph, whose discontinuation was also recently announced….”

open-science-in-a-click-through-the-openaire-open-science-lens

“How many hours do we spend on browsing the internet and searching for the article that supports our research and topic of focus? Plenty. For more than ten years, OpenAIRE has enabled us to find an open access publication via OpenAIRE Explore, since OpenAIRE Research Graph offers a massive collection of research data. That is the best case scenario, where we are already familiar with OpenAIRE and the Open Science ecosystem services. But science evolves, publications exponentially grow, and we seek for shortcuts and easy, trustable ways to perform work. OpenAIRE through its Open Innovation Call, funded by the OpenAIRE-Advance project and European Commission (GA:777541) back in 2020, called for new ideas and innovations to shape future tools for Open Science users. One of the tools introduced today is the Open Science Lens….”

Abuse of ORCID’s weaknesses by authors who use paper mills | SpringerLink

Abstract:  In many countries around the world that use authorship and academic papers for career advancement and recognition, the accurate identity of participating authors is vital. ORCID (Open Researcher and Contributor ID), an author disambiguation tool that was created in 2012, is being vociferously implemented across a wide swathe of journals, including by many leading publishers. In some countries, authors who publish in indexed journals, particularly in journals that carry a Clarivate Analytics’ Journal Impact Factor, are rewarded, sometimes even monetarily. A strong incentive to cheat and abuse the publication ethos thus exists. There has been a recent spike in the detection of papers apparently derived from paper mills that have multiple issues with figures. The use of such figures across many papers compromises the integrity of the content in all those papers, with widespread ramifications for the integrity of the biomedical literature and of journals that may be gamed by academics. The use of ORCID does not guarantee the authenticity of authors associated with a paper mill-derived paper, nor does it fortify the paper’s integrity. These weaknesses of ORCID may dampen trust in this tool, especially if the ORCID platform is being populated by “ghost” (empty) ORCID accounts of academics whose identities cannot be clearly verified, or disposable accounts (perhaps created by paper mill operators) that are used only once, exclusively to pass the paper submission step. Open-source forensic tools to assist academics, editors and publishers to detect problematic figures, and more stringent measures by ORCID to ensure robust author identity verification, are urgently required to protect themselves, and the wider biomedical literature.

 

Open-Source Tools for Chemistry Workshops Tickets, Multiple Dates | Eventbrite

“These workshops offer a unique opportunity for attendees to try out a range of open-source software packages for themselves with expert tuition in different aspects of chemistry. Attendees will be able to choose from sessions covering accessing online resources; data processing and visualisation; ligand and structure-based design, or computational chemistry. All software and training materials required for the workshop will be provided for attendees to install and run on their own computers….”

Easyreporting simplifies the implementation of Reproducible Research layers in R software

Abstract:  During last years “irreproducibility” became a general problem in omics data analysis due to the use of sophisticated and poorly described computational procedures. For avoiding misleading results, it is necessary to inspect and reproduce the entire data analysis as a unified product. Reproducible Research (RR) provides general guidelines for public access to the analytic data and related analysis code combined with natural language documentation, allowing third-parties to reproduce the findings. We developed easyreporting, a novel R/Bioconductor package, to facilitate the implementation of an RR layer inside reports/tools. We describe the main functionalities and illustrate the organization of an analysis report using a typical case study concerning the analysis of RNA-seq data. Then, we show how to use easyreporting in other projects to trace R functions automatically. This latter feature helps developers to implement procedures that automatically keep track of the analysis steps. Easyreporting can be useful in supporting the reproducibility of any data analysis project and shows great advantages for the implementation of R packages and GUIs. It turns out to be very helpful in bioinformatics, where the complexity of the analyses makes it extremely difficult to trace all the steps and parameters used in the study.