A renewed impetus for open research in Australia | Open Access Australasia

“There is now potential for a national approach to open science in Australia. However, Australian research and funding has some specific characteristics that mean that approaches in Europe or North America are not always easy to adapt. Furthermore, respecting Indigenous knowledge practices are essential. Protocols and practices for culturally appropriate publishing and data sharing are not yet widely adopted by publishers and infrastructure, although there is work in this area such as the CARE principles for Indigenous Data Governance and a thirst for engagement as shown at a 2020 OA week panel hosted by Australasian Open Access Strategy Group (AOASG). There is also more work to do to ensure that research on emerging, or regionally specific issues such as certain tropical diseases, Australian legal research, or work aimed at medical practitioners in regional and remote parts of the country is available and discoverable.

So how do we take open science forward at national and international levels? We recognise and welcome that change comes from many directions – from national governments, institutions, funders, intergovernmental agencies such as UNESCO but also individual researchers and participants in research themselves. Ultimately, though, universities must take the role as key drivers as well as final beneficiaries of more open science – since practices that drive open science will also support better reproducibility, robust translation and public trust in their research.”

A renewed impetus for open research in Australia | Open Access Australasia

“There is now potential for a national approach to open science in Australia. However, Australian research and funding has some specific characteristics that mean that approaches in Europe or North America are not always easy to adapt. Furthermore, respecting Indigenous knowledge practices are essential. Protocols and practices for culturally appropriate publishing and data sharing are not yet widely adopted by publishers and infrastructure, although there is work in this area such as the CARE principles for Indigenous Data Governance and a thirst for engagement as shown at a 2020 OA week panel hosted by Australasian Open Access Strategy Group (AOASG). There is also more work to do to ensure that research on emerging, or regionally specific issues such as certain tropical diseases, Australian legal research, or work aimed at medical practitioners in regional and remote parts of the country is available and discoverable.

So how do we take open science forward at national and international levels? We recognise and welcome that change comes from many directions – from national governments, institutions, funders, intergovernmental agencies such as UNESCO but also individual researchers and participants in research themselves. Ultimately, though, universities must take the role as key drivers as well as final beneficiaries of more open science – since practices that drive open science will also support better reproducibility, robust translation and public trust in their research.”

Academics edge closer to dream of research on cloud platforms | Financial Times

“In the race to harness the power of cloud computing, and further develop artificial intelligence, academics have a new concern: falling behind a fast-moving tech industry. In the US, 22 higher education institutions, including Stanford and Carnegie Mellon, have signed up to a National Research Cloud initiative seeking access to the computational power they need to keep up. It is one of several cloud projects being called for by academics globally, and is being explored by the US Congress, given the potential of the technology to deliver breakthroughs in healthcare and climate change….”

 

Mapping open knowledge institutions: an exploratory analysis of Australian universities [PeerJ]

Abstract:  While the movement for open research has gained momentum in recent years, there remain concerns about the broader commitment to openness in knowledge production and dissemination. Increasingly, universities are under pressure to transform themselves to engage with the wider community and to be more inclusive. Open knowledge institutions (OKIs) provide a framework that encourages universities to act with the principles of openness at their centre; not only should universities embrace digital open access (OA), but also lead actions in cultivating diversity, equity, transparency and positive changes in society. This leads to questions of whether we can evaluate the progress of OKIs and what are potential indicators for OKIs. As an exploratory study, this article reports on the collection and analysis of a list of potential OKI indicators. Data for these indicators are gathered for 43 Australian universities. The indicators provide high-dimensional and complex signals about university performances. They show evidence of large disparities in characteristics such as Indigenous employment and gender equity, and a preference for repository-mediated OA across Australian universities. We demonstrate use of the OKI evaluation framework to categorise these indicators into three platforms of diversity, communication and coordination. The analysis provides new insights into the Australian open knowledge landscape and ways of mapping different paths of OKIs.

Open access: it works best when enforced | Campus Morning Mail

“Last month the National Health and Medical Research Council sought submissions on going immediate OA on publication. If publishers refuse the council suggested authors’ accepted manuscripts could be made available by named institutional repositories (CMM April 16).

Which is good, but Drs Kingsley and Smith (both ex Cambridge University’s Office of Scholarly Communication) suggest tighter wording to make intent impossible to ignore.

And they call for checks, which institutions could use to make sure OA actually occurs. “There is evidence that even ‘light touch’ compliance checking results in significant behavioural change,” they write. Especially if “there is a significant consequence for non-compliance,” – which could be tying grants to OA rules….”

Health research council moves to mandate immediate open access – Research Professional News

“Australia’s National Health and Medical Research Council has proposed that immediate open-access publication of research resulting from its grants should become mandatory.

The council already requires researchers to list their patents on the government’s SourceIP website, but its existing policy allows a 12-month delay to open-access publication of NHMRC-funded research.

The proposed reforms would involve researchers publishing in open repositories, circumventing publishers’ fees, as well as publishing in traditional journals. Authors would be required to retain the rights to publish and share their work. It would also encourage researchers to release non-peer-reviewed preprints.

The proposals are contained in a discussion paper released by the council in April and would take effect from the beginning of 2022….”

Open Access Policy | NHMRC

“NHMRC supports the sharing of outputs from NHMRC funded research including publications and data. The aims of the NHMRC Open Access Policy are to mandate the open access sharing of publications and encourage innovative open access to research data. This policy also requires that patents resulting from NHMRC funding be made findable through listing in SourceIP….

NHMRC is seeking input from relevant stakeholders about proposed revisions to the Open Access Policy and Further Guidance. The proposed revisions are limited to sections of the documents about publications….”

Open Access Information | Open Access Australasia

“The group was founded in 2013 as the Australian Open Access Support Group, AOASG. In 2015, with the addition of members from New Zealand and a change of focus, it became the Australasian Open Access Strategy Group.

In 2021, we became Open Access Australasia.

We support all models of open access, and in particular we endorse the principles of the  F.A.I.R. Access Policy Statement  for research outputs to be Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable, ensuring they can be part of the global research ecosystem. 

We are committed to advocating for and raising awareness of open access in Australia and New Zealand through collaboration regionally and internationally and building capacity and expertise within this region.

This website aims to be an authoritative source of information on all aspects of open access in Australia and New Zealand.

Our major focus is on open access to research publications – preprints, peer reviewed scholarly manuscripts, books, monographs and theses. We also contribute to initiatives in open research practices, data, software, open educational resources, reform of research assessment and copyright and open licenses.

The Patron of Open Access Australasia is Emeritus Professor Tom Cochrane, Faculty of Law at QUT….”

More to Open Access than research | Campus Morning Mail

“The advantages of open access (OA) publishing focussed on scientific publishing in 2020, the year of COVID-19. Can it benefit higher education teaching and learning practice too?…

As an example, the Student Success journal is the result of a simple question posed by a leading academic: How do we keep dynamic conference and symposia conversations related to teaching and learning going, outside events?…

Instead, the Journal pivots towards its strengths as an OA publication. Indexed in the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Student Success is only one of nine Australian OA journals that meet its specific criteria for best practice in OA publishing. There are no article processing charges  and authors retain copyright while articles are licenced via Creative Commons Attribution License, which ensures the content can be used and reused. Authors are encouraged to submit research on practice that clearly identifies elements transferable to other domains and detail how a specific initiative contributes to the broader knowledge base….”

QUT – New Open Access agreement with CSIRO Publishing kicks off with sustainability study

“The first article from QUT researchers published under a new agreement with CSIRO Publishing is at the vanguard of an initiative that will see even more QUT research made Open Access in journals that were previously subscription-based.

CSIRO Publishing Read and Publish agreement removes article publishing charges for authors
Research articles previously by subscription now open to all
Creative Commons licence applied to published articles
First QUT article published under agreement looks at circular economy for livestock industry

The CSIRO Publishing Read and Publish agreement is a new type of comprehensive publisher agreement that will increase Open Access options for researchers, QUT Library’s manager, Scholarly Communications Services Stephanie Bradbury said….”