Wikipedia: The Most Reliable Source on the Internet? | PCMag

“[Q] Which brings us to Wikipedia. Many of us consult it, slightly wary of its bias, depth, and accuracy. But, as you’ll be sharing in your speech at Intellisys, the content actually ends up being surprisingly reliable. How does that happen?

[A] The answer to “should you believe Wikipedia?” isn’t simple. In my book I argue that the content of a popular Wikipedia page is actually the most reliable form of information ever created. Think about it—a peer-reviewed journal article is reviewed by three experts (who may or may not actually check every detail), and then is set in stone. The contents of a popular Wikipedia page might be reviewed by thousands of people. If something changes, it is updated. Those people have varying levels of expertise, but if they support their work with reliable citations, the results are solid. On the other hand, a less popular Wikipedia page might not be reliable at all….”

How open access can support Humanities book authors: Interview with Manuel Peréz García | For Researchers | Springer Nature

“Prof. Manuel Peréz García is a tenured Associate Professor at the Department of History, School of Humanities at Shanghai Jiao Tong University in China. He has published two open access books within the Palgrave Macmillan book series Palgrave Studies in Comparative Global History, for which he is editor-in-chief, called Global History and New Polycentric Approaches and Global History with Chinese Characteristics. In this interview, he talks about why open access is important not only for research in global history but also for society, authors and funders….”

Dr. Trevor Owens Wins 2021 Core/OCLC Kilgour Research Award | News and Press Center

“Dr. Trevor Owens has been selected as the recipient of the 2021 Frederick G. Kilgour Award for Research in Library and Information Technology, sponsored by OCLC and Core: Leadership, Infrastructure, Futures. He is the Head of Digital Content Management at The Library of Congress.

The Kilgour Award honors research relevant to the development of information technologies, especially work which shows promise of having a positive and substantive impact on any aspect(s) of the publication, storage, retrieval and dissemination of information, or the processes by which information and data are manipulated and managed. It recognizes a body of work probably spanning years, if not the majority of a career. The winner receives $2,000, and a citation.

Owens is being recognized for his work on the Zotero project, a National Endowment for the Humanities-funded study on the potential for text mining and data visualization tools for historical scholarship, the Viewshare collection visualization platform, and how he is reimagining the Library of Congress as a platform for the acquisition, preservation, and dissemination of digital materials of all types. He has also written several essential titles, including Designing Online Communities: How Designers, Developers, Community Managers, and Software Structure Discourse and Knowledge Production on the Web and The Theory and Craft of Digital Preservation: An Introduction, as well as dozens of journal articles, book chapters, conference proceedings, keynote presentations, and invited lectures. Through his pioneering work and leadership, he has helped change the understanding of information technology and its transformative application to libraries, especially around digital materials and strategies for access to, preservation of, and tools for maximizing use of them….”

Supporing MIT’s wider mission through OpenCourseWare | by MIT Open Learning | MIT Open Learning | Jun, 2021 | Medium

“When Abhay Parekh, who earned his doctorate in Electrical Engineering from MIT in 1992, first heard of MIT OpenCourseWare, he immediately recognized the potential of the program. “Having grown up in India, I didn’t really feel as a high school student that I had access to all the information that I wanted. If I had the opportunity to take advantage of something like OpenCourseWare I would have had way more fun learning.”

Parekh became an early supporter and member of the OCW External Advisory Board in the early 2000s, directing his gift to help establish a pipeline of faculty contributions from the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) department to the OCW platform. He quickly saw the value of video and multimedia for students and independent learners alike coming to the OCW site.

Today, Parekh is an Adjunct Professor of EECS at U.C. Berkeley, and still an avid user of OCW. As part of our 20th anniversary, we asked him to look back on his experience with OCW over the years, and why it still matters for learners and alumni today….”

How Academic Pirate Alexandra Elbakyan Is Fighting Scientific Misinformation

“In the decade since Alexandra Elbakyan founded Sci-Hub, science’s so-called “pirate queen” has amassed more than 85 million full-text research articles, which she’s made available, for free, to anyone who can track down her custom search engine. …

In the swirling chaos of the pandemic—and a new, or at least newly-acknowledged, era of digital disinformation—Sci-Hub kicked into overdrive. Its number of daily users has grown 20 percent, from 500,000 to 600,000, according to Elbakyan. During lockdown, people accessed articles about COVID-19 10 to 100 times more often than articles about other diseases. …”

Mercè Crosas, de Harvard a secretària de Transparència i Govern Obert | exterior

From Google’s English:  “After 17 years at Harvard University (United States), Mercè Crosas Navarro has been appointed Secretary of Transparency and Open Government, which belongs to the Department of Foreign Action and Transparency of the Catalan government. Until now he had served as head of research data management at Harvard University and head of the office of data science and technology at the Harvard Institute for Quantitative Social Science.”

Open access books in the humanities | For Researchers | Springer Nature

“Humanities book authors value the benefits that publishing open access can bring. Open access books are easy to find and share, allowing for authors to increase the real-world impact of their work.

Open access can support authors’ desires to increase interdisciplinary discussion and use of their work, and to reach a larger and broader audience outside of their normal networks to students, policymakers and the general public. Publishing an open access academic book can also help with career advancement. 

On this page you can find interviews with some of our featured book authors talking about their experiences of publishing open access, as well as open access book highlights from our Humanities list (History, Literature, Culture and Media Studies, Religion and Philosophy). Open access funding can sometimes be challenging to find, so you can also find a list of some of the funders who have supported our featured books, and information on our free Funding Support Service….”

Zeineb Yousif | Movers & Shakers 2021–Digital Developers | Library Journal

“Yousif was hired as the inaugural digital initiatives librarian at the Chester Fritz Library at the University of North Dakota (UND) in 2016, tasked with getting their institutional repository (IR) off the ground and promoting open access to scholarly resources. Under her leadership, UND’s IR has compiled nearly 30,000 digital objects, including theses and dissertations, research data sets, and a complete inventory of the university’s art collection. Work has begun on 3-D scanning more than 40,000 fossils for the geology department. Yousif also develops policies and guides for the IR, manages digitization projects, and works on digital exhibitions….”

Experience of using CORE Recommender – an interview – Research

“Making the repository experience more rewarding for users is a continual endeavour for repository managers, and the CORE Recommender is designed to provide a simple and fast solution to help researchers discover relevant further reading. The CORE Recommender is a plugin for repositories, journals and web interfaces that provides article suggestions closely related to the articles that the user is actively reading.  The source of recommended data is the base of CORE, which consists of over 25 million full texts from CORE….”

Experience of using CORE Recommender – CORE

“CORE Recommender is a plugin for repositories, journals and web interfaces that provides suggestions on relevant articles to the article a user is looking for. The source of recommended data is the base of CORE, which consists of over 25 million full texts from CORE. Today we have interviewed George Macgregor, Scholarly Publications & Research Data Manager at the University of Strathclyde, responsible for the Strathprints institutional repository.  Read about his experience of using CORE Recommender on the Jisc Research blog….”