OpenNotes – Patients and clinicians on the same page

“OpenNotes is the international movement promoting and studying transparent communication in healthcare. We help patients and clinicians share meaningful notes in medical records. We call these open notes….

OpenNotes is not software or a product. It’s a call to action.”

 

Share – Harvard University

“Host and share your digital scholarship projects – using videos, timelines, maps, delegated permissions and more – with a free domain name and access to versatile content management systems….

Explore the notion of digital identity with a personal portfolio, and learn how publishing on the web can frame an academic identity. Migrate to a top-level domain once you graduate….

Students, staff, and faculty – across all professional schools and FAS – are welcome to engage with this medium-term hosting pilot. Contact matt_cook@harvard.edu for more info. ”

Repository Quick Submit and CV Scraping – Charleston Hub

“A significant challenge in administering an institutional open-access repository is acquiring local scholarly content to distribute and build the repository.  Complicated licensing and author re-use rights can sometimes be viewed as a barrier by authors who are looking to deposit their work.  Paired with the challenges of communicating the benefits of repository deposit and the rights afforded by institutional open-access policies, limited resources, or lack of administrative support, repository managers often struggle to build a broader culture around deposits outside of open-access advocates.  A proactive, mediated, and collaborative publication review program can mitigate or solve some of these issues.  By reviewing an author’s publication list or CV with an eye towards repository deposit, repository managers and scholarly communication librarians can demystify the process and educate depositors on licensing and open-access policies.  Here, we outline such an effort at Harvard University. …”

Repository Quick Submit and CV Scraping – Charleston Hub

“A significant challenge in administering an institutional open-access repository is acquiring local scholarly content to distribute and build the repository.  Complicated licensing and author re-use rights can sometimes be viewed as a barrier by authors who are looking to deposit their work.  Paired with the challenges of communicating the benefits of repository deposit and the rights afforded by institutional open-access policies, limited resources, or lack of administrative support, repository managers often struggle to build a broader culture around deposits outside of open-access advocates.  A proactive, mediated, and collaborative publication review program can mitigate or solve some of these issues.  By reviewing an author’s publication list or CV with an eye towards repository deposit, repository managers and scholarly communication librarians can demystify the process and educate depositors on licensing and open-access policies.  Here, we outline such an effort at Harvard University. …”

Harvard Library Bulletin Relaunched | Harvard Library Communications

“The editorial team of Harvard Library Bulletin, Harvard Library’s online and open-access journal, is pleased to announce that the journal relaunched on Tuesday, November 24. Established in 1947, HLB has featured an eclectic mix of scholarly articles and news and events from across Harvard Library.

In its new online form, HLB will maintain the journal’s familiar features and now has the added ability to publish audio/visual and multimodal work and digital scholarship. As an open-access journal, HLB will not charge readers to access its content, nor assess article processing charges to authors. Content will be published on a rolling basis….”

The “voice of a distinct community” | Harvard Library Bulletin

“When we began planning the relaunch of Harvard Library Bulletin as an online, open access publishing portal, we could not have known that the common expectations and opportunities we were addressing would become paramount in Fall 2020. Given the physical distancing precautions required by the COVID-19 pandemic, providing equitable digital access to information and cultural resources is now more important than ever before.

As I write this I am working remotely, far from my Widener Library office. If I could be there, I would be browsing the back issues of Harvard Library Bulletin that sit on my shelves, pulling multiple volumes at once and enjoying the feel of turning pages, while perusing decades of scholarship and writing based on Harvard’s collections. Instead, I am appreciating the ability to dip into the contents of those volumes whenever I want, with the easy reading experience of Harvard Library’s Mirador Viewer and the digitized volumes deposited in DASH, the repository we use to share publications with the world. I am one of the many people who are grateful for the collaborations that have created the open digital infrastructure that allows us to create, discover and access collections online, from wherever the pandemic keeps us….”

Advancing Open Knowledge Grants | Harvard Library

“Harvard Library’s Advancing Open Knowledge Grants Program seeks to advance open knowledge and foster innovation to further diversity, inclusion, belonging and anti-racism

This new grant program provides project awards of up to $10,000. Projects can take a variety of forms, but should be grounded in Harvard Library’s values. Library staff are encouraged to partner with Harvard faculty, centers, or departments….”

Open access and author rights: questioning Harvard’s open access policy

Harvard’s open access (OA) policy, which has become a template for many institutional OA policies, intrinsically undermines the rights of scholars, researchers, authors and university staff, and it adulterates a principal tenet of open access, namely, that authors should control the intellectual property rights to their material. Assessing the implications of Harvard’s open access policy in the light of Peter Suber’s landmark book, Open Access, as well as resources from the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC) and Title 17 of the United States Code (USC), this article uncovers an intellectual ‘landgrab’ by universities that may at times not work in the interest of the author or creator of research and weakens the appeal of open access.

Reacting to the unprecedented urgency of COVID-19 research at Harvard: DASH’s fast-tracking deposit program · Harvard Library Office for Scholarly Communication

“This past March, the Harvard Library Office for Scholarly Communication (OSC) launched a program to facilitate the rapid release of Harvard’s COVID-19 research. Under this program, authors submit coronavirus-related papers to DASH, Harvard’s open-access institutional repository, where they are expedited, or “fast-tracked,” through the standard workflow. Now, seven months on, this program has successfully distributed a collection of vital research open-access to a global audience….

Fast-tracking COVID-19 was a simple program to implement, for both OSC staff and authors. Leveraging current DASH submission tools, authors deposit their work to DASH as they normally would. After deposit, authors contact OSC staff to request a fast-track. OSC then expedites the deposit and makes it public in DASH, typically within a few hours….

As of October, 2020, over 30 COVID-19-related works have been fast-tracked in DASH over the past seven months. These works have seen over 400,000 downloads from readers across the globe; DASH had more than one million downloads in the month of June 2020, the repository’s best download month ever, due in part to the COVID-19 fast-track program. Our first fast-tracked paper, by Dr. Marc Lipsitch, registered over 21,000 readers during its first four days on DASH….”