A diamond mission | Research Information

“Diamond open access (OA), sometimes also referred to as platinum open access, is a form of gold open access – which means that there is permanent and unrestricted online access to an article in its final published form (or version of record). Diamond OA means there is no requirement for authors to pay article processing charges, writes May Copsey. 

The diamond model for open access has recently been in the spotlight, due to the publication of a report from Coalition S and Science Europe looking into the landscape of these journals that are free for readers and authors.1 Chemical Science, from the Royal Society of Chemistry, was one of the journals that fed into this report and as executive editor, I was interested to see the full picture of these journals across scientific publishing. 

The report shows that there are a huge number of relatively small diamond OA journals, run and managed by the scientific community themselves, usually on a volunteer basis. The costs of these journals are generally taken on by the institutions that run them, such as universities and societies. The study found there to be multiple scientific strengths with this model, however they face some key challenges, including indexing and archiving, governance and technical capabilities around editorial systems and publication platforms. …

So the conversation doesn’t always have to be about gold versus green or how much the APC will be. Societies, with the strong support of their communities, can help lead the way.”

Royal Society Open Science welcomes PCI Registered Reports | Royal Society

“Royal Society Open Science has been in the vanguard of efforts to expand the availability of Registered Reports as a journal article type. The journal began offering Registered Reports in 2015 (not long after the journal itself launched in 2014), and in 2018 we launched a modified version of the format to more easily accommodate Replication studies, as part of our Accountable Replication Policy. Now, in April 2021, we take our next step in promoting Registered Reports (RRs) by welcoming the submission of Stage 2 Registered Reports that have been reviewed and recommended by the Peer Community In (PCI) Registered Reports platform.

PCI Registered Reports is a non-profit, non-commercial platform that coordinates the peer review of Registered Report preprints. Once the submissions are accepted following peer review (or in PCI terms “recommended”), the completed Stage 2 Registered Report is posted at the preprint server where the preprint is hosted, and the peer reviews and recommendation of the preprint are posted at the PCI RR website. Following the completion of peer review, authors have the option to publish their articles in a growing list of “PCI RR-friendly” journals that have committed to accepting PCI Registered Report recommendations without further peer review. …”

A Tale of Two Societies

“Conclusions

There are significant shifts in national patterns that can be associated with changes in funder policy and with the offerings of RSC and ACS
RSC took a significant lead in early open access provision for chemistry, particularly in the UK but has fallen back
National averages don’t tell the full picture. Specific institutions show very different and quite specific patterns. There are differential policy effects
Recent changes are strongly driven by read and publish agreements with substantial shifts in publisher choice corresponding to introduction of deals.
There is evidence of concentration of publishing in chemistry with two large publishers taking up an increasing percentage. Should we be concerned about diversity?”

Open access research

“By making research freely available to anyone who needs it, open access (OA) publishing allows wider knowledge dissemination, removes reading restrictions in its gold form, and offers more opportunities for researchers to improve the visibility of their work and build a strong reputation.

Because of this, science can progress faster. This is good for everyone.

An open future calls.

How will you answer?…”

World-leading publishers join us in action-focussed commitment to make research publishing more inclusive and diverse

“We have gathered publishers of more than 4,400 scholarly journals and tens of thousands of books in a landmark commitment to reduce bias.

Publishers responsible for tens of thousands of peer-reviewed journals and books have signed an agreement with us to take a proactive stance against bias, as we commit to working together to better reflect the diversity of our communities and to remove barriers for under-represented groups.

The joint statement will impact scholarly publishing on a global scale, having been initiated by the Royal Society of Chemistry and signed by the American Chemical Society (ACS), BMJ, Cambridge University Press, the Company of Biologists, Emerald Publishing, Elsevier, Hindawi, IOP Publishing, Oxford University Press and Royal Society Publishing….”

World-leading publishers join us in action-focussed commitment to make research publishing more inclusive and diverse

“We have gathered publishers of more than 4,400 scholarly journals and tens of thousands of books in a landmark commitment to reduce bias.

Publishers responsible for tens of thousands of peer-reviewed journals and books have signed an agreement with us to take a proactive stance against bias, as we commit to working together to better reflect the diversity of our communities and to remove barriers for under-represented groups.

The joint statement will impact scholarly publishing on a global scale, having been initiated by the Royal Society of Chemistry and signed by the American Chemical Society (ACS), BMJ, Cambridge University Press, the Company of Biologists, Emerald Publishing, Elsevier, Hindawi, IOP Publishing, Oxford University Press and Royal Society Publishing….”

OA, renewals, and a 3% price drop for package A subscribers | Publishing blog | Royal Society

“As many green open access journals accept increasing numbers of paid OA articles, librarians have rightly pointed out that it’s not appropriate for publishers to charge for both subscriptions and APC’s; the so-called ‘double dipping’.

Here at the Royal Society we do not double dip. We account for changes through our transparent pricing mechanism. This means that as we publish more open access articles, we charge less for our subscriptions to ensure that the cost to our readers remains stable.

For 2020 an increase in open access articles means that the list price of Package A, which covers all our physical sciences and cross disciplinary articles, will drop by 3%….”

Researchers warn open access Plan S may still be too rushed, despite one-year delay | News | Chemistry World

The funders behind Plan S – an ambitious set of policies that aims to speed up the transition to open access publishing – have released updated guidelines that delay implementing the plan for a year and provide more clarity on transformative publishing agreements.

The revisions have attracted mixed reactions from chemists, some of whom welcome the clarity while others worry it will harm their careers.

COAlition S – the group of funders behind Plan S – has said the plan will now come into effect in 2021 rather than the proposed 2020 date to give publishers more time to shift their business models. While many researchers agree this is necessary, some say it still does not allow enough time for the scientific community to adapt….”

New Open Access publishing models at KAUST | University Library

KAUST University Library is happy to announce new open access publishing agreements with 3 STEM publishers, in collaboration with KAUST Office of Sponsored Research (OSR). These agreements will allow KAUST corresponding authors to publish their accepted articles open access mode (in the journals of publishers listed below) and made openly available under creative common license, at no cost to the author.

  • Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) : Read and Publish Model coverage 2019-2021
  • Cambridge University Press (CUP) : Read and Publish Model coverage 2019-2021
  • Institute of Physics (IOP) : Off-set Publishing Model coverage 2019

The first of its kind in the region, these publishing models aim over time to reduce the proportion of pay-walled scholarly articles, as library subscription funding shift to open access publishing. University Library, with the support of OSR, is taking a proactive role of negotiating with other publishers on similar agreements in the coming years, and expecting to be aligned with global open access and open science movements. This new initiative will support KAUST open access policy and supplement KAUST research repository, aimed to increase the impact of KAUST research publications through its availability to the world without locking them behind publisher’s paywalls.

 

More details of this initiative can be read from the guide, and you can also contact us via library@kaust.edu.sa …”