How open access can support Humanities book authors: Interview with Manuel Peréz García | For Researchers | Springer Nature

“Prof. Manuel Peréz García is a tenured Associate Professor at the Department of History, School of Humanities at Shanghai Jiao Tong University in China. He has published two open access books within the Palgrave Macmillan book series Palgrave Studies in Comparative Global History, for which he is editor-in-chief, called Global History and New Polycentric Approaches and Global History with Chinese Characteristics. In this interview, he talks about why open access is important not only for research in global history but also for society, authors and funders….”

Supporing MIT’s wider mission through OpenCourseWare | by MIT Open Learning | MIT Open Learning | Jun, 2021 | Medium

“When Abhay Parekh, who earned his doctorate in Electrical Engineering from MIT in 1992, first heard of MIT OpenCourseWare, he immediately recognized the potential of the program. “Having grown up in India, I didn’t really feel as a high school student that I had access to all the information that I wanted. If I had the opportunity to take advantage of something like OpenCourseWare I would have had way more fun learning.”

Parekh became an early supporter and member of the OCW External Advisory Board in the early 2000s, directing his gift to help establish a pipeline of faculty contributions from the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) department to the OCW platform. He quickly saw the value of video and multimedia for students and independent learners alike coming to the OCW site.

Today, Parekh is an Adjunct Professor of EECS at U.C. Berkeley, and still an avid user of OCW. As part of our 20th anniversary, we asked him to look back on his experience with OCW over the years, and why it still matters for learners and alumni today….”

Open Science Stories podcast

Open science concepts explained as stories in 10 minutes or less, hosted by Heidi Seibold. We’d love to hear your story! If you think you might have a story to tell, write an e-mail to opensciencestories@gmail.com This podcast is licensed under CC-BY 4.0 RSS feed: https://anchor.fm/s/46287364/podcast/rss Contact: opensciencestories@gmail.com

Open access books in the humanities | For Researchers | Springer Nature

“Humanities book authors value the benefits that publishing open access can bring. Open access books are easy to find and share, allowing for authors to increase the real-world impact of their work.

Open access can support authors’ desires to increase interdisciplinary discussion and use of their work, and to reach a larger and broader audience outside of their normal networks to students, policymakers and the general public. Publishing an open access academic book can also help with career advancement. 

On this page you can find interviews with some of our featured book authors talking about their experiences of publishing open access, as well as open access book highlights from our Humanities list (History, Literature, Culture and Media Studies, Religion and Philosophy). Open access funding can sometimes be challenging to find, so you can also find a list of some of the funders who have supported our featured books, and information on our free Funding Support Service….”

Experience of using CORE Recommender – an interview – Research

“Making the repository experience more rewarding for users is a continual endeavour for repository managers, and the CORE Recommender is designed to provide a simple and fast solution to help researchers discover relevant further reading. The CORE Recommender is a plugin for repositories, journals and web interfaces that provides article suggestions closely related to the articles that the user is actively reading.  The source of recommended data is the base of CORE, which consists of over 25 million full texts from CORE….”

Experience of using CORE Recommender – CORE

“CORE Recommender is a plugin for repositories, journals and web interfaces that provides suggestions on relevant articles to the article a user is looking for. The source of recommended data is the base of CORE, which consists of over 25 million full texts from CORE. Today we have interviewed George Macgregor, Scholarly Publications & Research Data Manager at the University of Strathclyde, responsible for the Strathprints institutional repository.  Read about his experience of using CORE Recommender on the Jisc Research blog….”

„Wir müssen in Fachdisziplinen denken, um mehr Titel und Programme im Open Access zu ermöglichen“ | Open Research Community

From Google’s English:  “The financing model “wbv Open Library,” which the publisher and Knowledge Unlatched have jointly launched, is oriented towards the disciplines of adult education and professional and business education. This interview is about the framework that had to be defined, about pricing, planning processes – but also about the fun it is to try something new. Your goal: to provide the funding institutions and libraries with discipline-oriented access to Open Access publications….”

(PDF) A Critical Conversation with Alexandra Elbakyan: Is she the Pirate Queen, Robin Hood, a Scholarly Activist, or a Butterfly Flapping its Wings?

Abstract:  The conversation with Alexandra Elbakyan intends to explore the Sci-Hub phenomenon and the core motives that initiated Sci-Hub. Accordingly, Sci-Hub is an open science project that has gone viral and is driven by people who pursue knowledge. The core idea behind the Sci-Hub is very simple: people should have access to knowledge without any restrictions. Elbakyan argues that science should be ruled by the scientist, not by the corporations. It is here, in a publish or perish scholarly world, that Sci-Hub aims to give control back to scientists and empower them. Elbakyan claims that for-profit corporations are gatekeeping knowledge, whereas Sci-Hub is disseminating it for the greater good. The conversation with Elbakyan about Sci-Hub raises a critical question for us to answer: Who is the real owner of the information?

Conversation with Philip Hess, Knowledge Unlatched; and Marcel  Wrzesinski, Open Access Officer, Humboldt Institute for Internet and Society

“In today’s episode we feature an interview of Philip Hess, Head of Publisher Relations, Knowledge Unlatched; and Marcel Wrzesinski, Open Access Officer, Humboldt Institute for Internet and Society.  The interview was conducted by Matthew Ismail, Director of Collection Development, University of Central Michigan. 

We’ll hear from Philip and Marcel about a German OA project that focuses on supporting small, non-APC, scholar-led journals. It’s a Knowledge Unlatched and Humboldt University project.

Philipp Hess is currently the Head of Publisher Relations at Knowledge Unlatched and is pursuing a complimentary master’s degree at the University of St. Gallen and the University of Arts Berlin in Leadership in digital Innovation. Before that he studied Engineering and Industrial Design in the Netherlands and Japan, before getting into scholarly content while working in the Management Department for Kiron, a platform that offers higher education to refugees. His goal is to make knowledge accessible to everyone, everywhere and to help shape the future dissemination of scholarly content.

Marcel Wrzesinski is an Open Access Officer at the Humboldt Institute for Internet and Society and works in the research project “Sustainable journal financing through consortial support structures in small and interdisciplinary subjects” (in cooperation with Knowledge Unlatched). Prior to this, he led Open Access activities at the International Graduate Centre for the Study of Culture (Giessen) and developed transformation strategies for gender studies at Freie Universität (Berlin). He is an editor of two open access journals, headed various working groups on digital publishing, and advises research institutions on Open Access and Open Science. His interests lie in fostering and sustaining Open Access in smaller and interdisciplinary fields….”

Tilting the balance back towards libraries | Research Information

Jason Priem tells of his hopes for a ‘long-overdue’ change in academic publishing.

“This presents a compelling opportunity for us as OA advocates: by helping libraries quantify the alternatives to toll-access publishing, we can empower librarians to cancel multi-million dollar big deals. This in turn will begin to turn off the faucet of money flowing from universities to toll-access publishing houses. In short: by helping libraries cancel big deals, we can make toll-access publishing less profitable, and accelerate the transition toward universal OA.”