Supporing MIT’s wider mission through OpenCourseWare | by MIT Open Learning | MIT Open Learning | Jun, 2021 | Medium

“When Abhay Parekh, who earned his doctorate in Electrical Engineering from MIT in 1992, first heard of MIT OpenCourseWare, he immediately recognized the potential of the program. “Having grown up in India, I didn’t really feel as a high school student that I had access to all the information that I wanted. If I had the opportunity to take advantage of something like OpenCourseWare I would have had way more fun learning.”

Parekh became an early supporter and member of the OCW External Advisory Board in the early 2000s, directing his gift to help establish a pipeline of faculty contributions from the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) department to the OCW platform. He quickly saw the value of video and multimedia for students and independent learners alike coming to the OCW site.

Today, Parekh is an Adjunct Professor of EECS at U.C. Berkeley, and still an avid user of OCW. As part of our 20th anniversary, we asked him to look back on his experience with OCW over the years, and why it still matters for learners and alumni today….”

Open education resources to shape post-pandemic world

“For the past two decades, the world has been building open knowledge on a massive scale, with open educational resources as a cornerstone. The 2001 launches of MIT OpenCourseWare and Creative Commons formed a solid foundation of this global open educational resource movement, which now supports many millions of learners from all walks of life.

Now, as we begin to grapple with the long-term impacts and changes in education brought on by the pandemic year, it’s crucial to assess how open educational resource (OER) tools and resources are reaching those who need and use them most. In this article, we’ll focus on students in Africa….

Beyond its role in sustaining education through the pandemic, OER like MIT OpenCourseWare has several qualities that will be essential in the rebuilding and progress to come, supporting efforts to increase equity and live more sustainably as framed by the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

• OER is inclusive, because it’s open for all to adapt for diverse needs and have all voices reflected.

• OER is resilient, always there when you need it, free to use in classrooms and carry with you through any future disruptions.

• OER is iterative, a collective work in progress that admits the latest insights into what’s working, and what’s not working, as knowledge is created and applied.

• OER is scalable, enabling hyper-local knowledge and lived experiences to be shared and built into a global pool of knowledge….”

Laura Hanscom named head of Scholarly Communications and Collections Strategy | MIT Libraries News

“Laura Hanscom has been appointed the head of the department of Scholarly Communications and Collections Strategy (SCCS), the MIT Libraries announced today. In this position, she will lead MIT Libraries services and staff in transforming models of scholarly publishing to increase the impact and reach of research and scholarship and promote open, equitable, and sustainable publishing and access models. The SCCS head also coordinates overall collection management strategy for the Libraries’ general collections, as well as vendor negotiations and repository services. Hanscom began serving in her new role April 12, 2021. …”

Celebrate OCW’s 20th anniversary Tickets, Wed, Apr 7, 2021 at 12:00 PM | Eventbrite

“You’re invited to Celebrate OCW’s 20th anniversary

Wednesday, April 7, 2021 | 12PM – 1PM ET

Webcast Link: http://web.mit.edu/webcast/ocw/1320/

 

This public livestreamed celebration will feature OCW’s impact around the world and plans for the future of open sharing….”

Postdoc–Computational Social Science for Scholarly Communications & Open & Equitable Scholarship – Cambridge MA 02139

“POSTDOCTOAL ASSOCIATE-COMPUTATIONAL SOCIAL SCIENCE FOR SCHOLARLY COMMUNICATIONS AND OPEN AND EQUITABLE SCHOLARSHIP, MIT Libraries-Center for Research on Equitable and Open Scholarship (CREOS), to conduct original research in the areas of open and equitable scholarship under the guidance of the principal investigator, Roger Levy, and in partnership with additional faculty mentors, research scientists, and fellow postdocs. Will conduct original research in computational social science (broadly construed) on topics related to scholarly communications and open and equitable scholarship. Potential topics include large-scale automated analysis of the history of ideas; experimental interventions and natural experiments in scholarly peer review and reproducible research; critical economic analysis of the scholarly publication landscape; review and development of best-practices guidelines for large collaborative open scholarship projects; and comparison and advocacy work for open-source platforms for managing peer review. …”

 

 

Postdoctoral Associate–Advancing Equity and Accessibility in Archives and Special Collections – Cambridge MA 02139

“POSTDOCTORAL ASSOCIATE–ADVANCING EQUITY AND ACCESSIBILITY IN ARCHIVES AND SPECIAL COLLECTIONS, MIT Libraries-Center for Research on Equitable and Open Scholarship (CREOS), to conduct research in the areas of open and equitable scholarship under the guidance of the principal investigator Stephanie Frampton and in collaboration with library and faculty mentors, research scientists, and fellow postdocs. The research outcomes will inform future research, implementations, or adoptable resources for MIT Libraries and the broader library community.  Will focus on research related to identifying, assessing, developing, and promulgating best practices for advancing equity and accessibility in archives and special collections, with a particular focus on accessibility of digital collections for persons with disabilities. The first year will focus on identifying, describing, and analyzing existing accessibility practices and interventions to digital archives and special collections access; while the second will focus on designing prototypes and evaluating interventions within MIT Libraries’ Distinctive Collections….”

 

 

All You Need is Love: 10 Reasons to Fall in Love with OCW – Open Matters | MIT OpenCourseWare News

“Falling in love. Maybe it’s sudden. Or maybe it’s a slow burn that ignites into full blown euphoria and amazement. Sometimes it’s inexplicable and other times you might need convincing, so here are 10 reasons to fall in love with OCW.

It doesn’t cost a thing. You heard that right—everything on OCW is free! There are more than 2,500 MIT courses and supplemental resources that span both the undergraduate and graduate levels in 34 disciplines all for $0.00.
Lose yourself in hours of video. Have you already watched everything on Netflix? Whether you’re into math, science, economics, or even music, you will find tons of videos to watch on our YouTube channel. Our fans watched 26 million minutes of video last month! …”

MIT Libraries develop innovative open access agreements with PLOS | MIT Libraries News

“The MIT Libraries has negotiated two new open-access publishing agreements with the nonprofit publisher Public Library of Science (PLOS) that allow all MIT authors to publish in all PLOS titles with no publishing fees. The agreement aligns with the core principles of the MIT Framework for Publisher Contracts.

The aim of the PLOS agreements is to remove the burden of cost of publishing articles from authors and allow MIT to support authors who publish open access. Instead of authors paying article processing charges (or APCs, payments charged to authors or their institutions to make a work available open access), PLOS charges the Institute transparent and equitable fees as guided by the Plan S Price and Service Transparency Framework.

“PLOS recognizes that APCs create barriers for some researchers to publish open access and contribute to inequity in scholarly communications,” said Chris Bourg, director of MIT Libraries. “This agreement was a true collaboration made possible by our shared goals of openness, equity, and transparency.”

Acknowledging that most research is a collaborative effort, these agreements break new ground by making all MIT authors, corresponding and contributing, eligible. Further aligning with MIT’s values, all authors from Research4Life countries are included in the Collective Action Publishing agreement; Research4Lifeprovides low-and middle-income countries with online access to academic and professional peer-reviewed content….”

MIT Libraries develop innovative open access agreements with PLOS | MIT Libraries News

“The MIT Libraries has negotiated two new open-access publishing agreements with the nonprofit publisher Public Library of Science (PLOS) that allow all MIT authors to publish in all PLOS titles with no publishing fees. The agreement aligns with the core principles of the MIT Framework for Publisher Contracts.

The aim of the PLOS agreements is to remove the burden of cost of publishing articles from authors and allow MIT to support authors who publish open access. Instead of authors paying article processing charges (or APCs, payments charged to authors or their institutions to make a work available open access), PLOS charges the Institute transparent and equitable fees as guided by the Plan S Price and Service Transparency Framework.

“PLOS recognizes that APCs create barriers for some researchers to publish open access and contribute to inequity in scholarly communications,” said Chris Bourg, director of MIT Libraries. “This agreement was a true collaboration made possible by our shared goals of openness, equity, and transparency.”

Acknowledging that most research is a collaborative effort, these agreements break new ground by making all MIT authors, corresponding and contributing, eligible. Further aligning with MIT’s values, all authors from Research4Life countries are included in the Collective Action Publishing agreement; Research4Lifeprovides low-and middle-income countries with online access to academic and professional peer-reviewed content….”

Head Scholarly Communications and Collections Strategy Job Opening in Cambridge, Massachusetts – ALA JobLIST | Jobs in Library & Information Science & Technology

“Reporting to the Associate Director for Collections, the department head for Scholarly Communications & Collections Strategy leads services and staff in transforming models of scholarly publishing in ways that increase the impact and reach of research and scholarship and that promote open, equitable, and sustainable publishing and access models. The Scholarly Communications & Collections Strategy department coordinates overall collection management strategy for the Libraries’ general collections, as well as vendor negotiations and repository services. In enacting collection management strategy, the head of SCCS leads our pursuit of business models and contract terms that meet MIT values, which include allowing for computational access, generous reuse rights, user privacy protections, and forwarding the principles of the MIT Framework for Publisher Contracts adopted jointly by the Libraries and the Faculty Committee for the Library System in 2019. In addition to operationalizing this open scholarship agenda, the next head for Scholarly Communications & Collections Strategy will actively encourage the acceleration to digital-first collection building, advance diversity, equity, and inclusion in the collections, strategize with colleagues across the Libraries to focus our physical collections on the essential core — a portfolio of exceptional quality and singular relevance to MIT research and teaching — and lead the development of new collecting strategies to support data-intensive and computational research and learning….”