How the COVID pandemic is changing global science collaborations

“Another long-term trend that researchers are watching out for is the push for scientists to share their research data more openly. This was mandated by the biomedical funding charity, Wellcome, for research that it funded on COVID-19, although there have been instances of people circumventing the rules by making data available ‘upon request’.

In theory, the push for open data might lessen international collaboration if it is no longer necessary to establish personal relationships to access data. Sugimoto says this could happen, but also wonders whether open data might help to link researchers from across the world by making their work more visible. “It could actually, in some ways, enhance and increase international collaboration rather than diminish it,” she says….”

Analyzing Education Data with Open Science Best Practices, R, and OSF | OER Commons

“Overview: The webinar features Dr. Joshua Rosenberg from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville and Dr. Cynthia D’Angelo from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign discussing best practices examples for using R. They will present: a) general strategies for using R to analyze educational data and b) accessing and using data on the Open Science Framework (OSF) with R via the osfr package. This session is for those both new to R and those with R experience looking to learn more about strategies and workflows that can help to make it possible to analyze data in a more transparent, reliable, and trustworthy way.”

IFLA signs the WikiLibrary Manifesto

“IFLA has endorsed the WikiLibrary Manifesto, aimed at connecting libraries and Wikimedia projects such as Wikibase in order to promote the dissemination of knowledge in open formats, especially in linked open data networks….”

Gigabyte

“GigaByte (ISSN:2709-4715) aims to promote the most rapid exchange of scientific information in a formal peer-reviewed publishing platform. Modern research is data-driven, iterative, and aims to be FAIR: Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable. It is also fast moving, with available data and computational tools changing constantly and swiftly evolving fields continuously being tested, updated and modified by the community. Given that, GigaByte is focused on publishing short, focused, data-driven articles using a publishing platform that will allow nearly immediate online publication on acceptance as well as an ability to update published articles. This drastically reduces writing and reviewing. With that, GigaByte provides scientists a venue to rapidly and easily share and build upon each other’s research outputs.

Currently we publish two types of articles: Data Release highlight and contextualizing exceptional and openly available datasets, while Technical Release articles are present an open-source software tool or an experimental or computational method for the analysis or handling of research data.

GigaByte is an open access and open science journal. As with our sister-journal GigaScience— we publish ALL reusable and shareable research objects, such as data, software tools and workflows, from data-driven research. …”

Biodiversity Literature Repository

“The Biodiversity Literature Repository (BLR) has been growing from a community on Zenodo to be a service dedicated to liberate and make open access, FAIR (findable, accessible, interoperable and reusable) data hidden in the hundreds of millions of pages of scholarly publications.

It is built on top of Zenodo, a digital repository hosted at CERN, which provides a sustainable and robust infrastructure for long tail research data, which can consist of small datasets that otherwise would be lost.

Originally a collaboration between Zenodo, Plazi and Pensoft, BLR began as a repository for taxonomic publications which lacked Digital Object Identifiers (DOI) and thus were effectively orphaned from the network of online citations. As it grew its scope expanded to morphed into a highly interlinked repository that focuses on include illustrations and taxonomic treatments contained in publications with all these content types interlinked among themselves and enhanced with and rich metadata.

The source data for BLR are scholarly publications that are most often in PDF or html format but sometimes in XML formats whose structured data facilitates the automated data extraction.

The largest data users are the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) and the United States’ National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI).

Support of BLR comes from the Arcadia Fund and the three partner institutions Zenodo, Plazi and Pensoft.”

Biodiversity Heritage Library and Plazi: Biodiversity Literature Repository

“This document describes the cooperation and collaboration of BHL and Plazi, on common goals. It outlines common goals and areas of common interests, and clarifies key areas of responsibility. The digital arena allows building a large corpus of literature and from that a “graph” of knowledge or knowledge graph through identification, extraction and linking of data. It provides an emerging access platform to the knowledge beyond the conventional traditional human-reader focused access. It allows new modes of access, including text and data mining, search, visualization and the discovery of new findings based on the accessibility of data. This knowledge graph does not replace existing media, but rather complements them. In the case of biodiversity sciences, it is based on both the estimated 500 Million pages of biodiversity literature and on increasingly born-digital publications. In biodiversity, the very rich data centric publications with the highly sophisticated implicit citation networks are a perfect base to build such a knowledge graph. In order to build the knowledge graph, the data in the publications must be liberated and made open, findable, accessible, interoperable, reusable (FAIR) for machine use. This is the necessary additional step after the digitization of existing literature….”

The Open Science Guide of Guides | Zenodo

“In this compendium, we compile Open Science guides with their specific features and fields of application. The book was made as part of a student seminar at the Hannover University of Applied Sciences and Arts in close cooperation with the TIB Open Science Lab as part of TIB Book Sprints R&D….”

CARBIS BAY G7 SUMMIT COMMUNIQUÉ | The White House

“13. To get and stay ahead of the virus, we commit to continue our investment in cutting edge research and innovation, seeking to ensure that global vaccines remain effective against variants of concern, and that effective tests and treatments are available. To this end, we will boost global surveillance  and genomic sequencing and swift information sharing needed to enable the rapid detection to combat the virus and its emerging variants. G7 countries should extend every effort to achieve, wherever possible, a level of genomic sequencing of at least 10 per cent of all new positive COVID-19 samples during the pandemic phase and share genomic sequencing information with existing global databases….

36. Underpinning all of these future frontiers, and wider challenges of the coming century, is the importance of scientific discovery and its deployment. We will therefore work together to promote stronger collaboration on research and development, and promote principles of research security and integrity and open science building off the historical levels of collaboration seen in the past year to internationally beneficial results. Central to this should be building a diverse and resilient science and research community, inclusive for all groups  including women. Domestically we will seek to redress the imbalance in women’s and girls’ under-representation in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) which acts as a barrier to access to these growing industries. We will explore how existing and potential new mechanisms and initiatives can support risk reduction, prevention and response to future systemic crises, natural disasters and pace of technological change. As such we endorse the G7 Compact on Research Collaboration and its commitment to: support policies, legal frameworks and programmes to promote research collaboration; promote sharing of research data; explore enhancements to research assessment and rewards for collaboration and knowledge sharing; and develop a common set of principles which will help protect research and innovation ecosystem across the G7 to open and reciprocal research collaboration….”

G7 Research Compact

As Open Societies with democratic values we believe in academic freedom. The freedom to pursue intellectual enquiry and to innovate allows us to make progress on shared issues and drive forward the frontiers of knowledge and discovery for the benefit of the entire world. We recognise that research and innovation are fundamentally global endeavours. Nations, citizens,  institutions,  and  businesses  have  made  huge  strides  forward,  not  otherwise possible, through open research collaboration across borders. Working together we will use our position as leading science nations to collaborate on global challenges, increase the transparency and integrity of research, and facilitate data free flow with trust to drive innovation and advance knowledge.