WILL PODCASTING AND SOCIAL MEDIA REPLACE JOURNALS AND TRADITIONAL SCIENCE COMMUNICATION? NO, BUT… | American Journal of Epidemiology | Oxford Academic

Abstract:  The digital world in which we live is changing rapidly. The changing media environment is having a direct impact on traditional forms of communication and knowledge translation in public health and epidemiology. Openly accessible digital media can be used to reach a broader and more diverse audience of trainees, scientists, and the lay public than traditional forms of scientific communication. The new digital landscape for delivering content is vast and new platforms are continuously being added. We focus on several, including Twitter and podcasting and discuss their relevance to epidemiology and science communication. We highlight three key reasons why we think epidemiologists should be engaging with these mediums: 1) science communication, 2) career advancement, 3) development of a community and public service. Other positive and negative consequences of engaging in these forms of new media are also discussed. The authors of this commentary are all engaged in social media and podcasting for scientific communication and in this manuscript, we reflect on our experience with these mediums as tools to advance the field of epidemiology.

 

Open Science Stories podcast

Open science concepts explained as stories in 10 minutes or less, hosted by Heidi Seibold. We’d love to hear your story! If you think you might have a story to tell, write an e-mail to opensciencestories@gmail.com This podcast is licensed under CC-BY 4.0 RSS feed: https://anchor.fm/s/46287364/podcast/rss Contact: opensciencestories@gmail.com

What are preprints? [Originally published in DADOS’ blog in May/2021] | SciELO in Perspective

“In 2020, DADOS began accepting the submission of manuscripts from preprint servers. However, there are still many concerns from the academic community, especially in the Social Sciences, about what preprints are and what changes they bring to the traditional framework of scientific assessment and publication. Our goal here is to answer these questions briefly, in addition to explaining in a simple way how to submit a preprint to DADOS. To this end, we have prepared a schematic of how manuscripts are evaluated in the traditional double-blind review system and how it has been modified in the preprint model. Next, we have a video and a podcast episode (both available in Portuguese only) about how DADOS will incorporate preprints, followed by a text summarizing this material….”

SSP’s Early Career Development Podcast: Episode 7, Open Access (Part 1) – The Scholarly Kitchen

“In this seventh episode of SSP’s Early Career Development Podcast, co-hosts Meredith Adinolfi (Cell Press) and Sara Grimme (Digital Science) answer some questions from early career professionals about Open Access publishing.

As the first of a two-part series on Open Access (OA) publishing, this episode covers some of the basics including a definition of OA, the different OA publishing models, how OA works for the author, and how metadata is involved in the “open” agenda.

In part 2 (Episode 8), which will be published in June 2021, Sara and Meredith engage with Ann Michael (DeltaThink) to discuss some of the more complex aspects of Open Access….”

Conversation with Philip Hess, Knowledge Unlatched; and Marcel  Wrzesinski, Open Access Officer, Humboldt Institute for Internet and Society

“In today’s episode we feature an interview of Philip Hess, Head of Publisher Relations, Knowledge Unlatched; and Marcel Wrzesinski, Open Access Officer, Humboldt Institute for Internet and Society.  The interview was conducted by Matthew Ismail, Director of Collection Development, University of Central Michigan. 

We’ll hear from Philip and Marcel about a German OA project that focuses on supporting small, non-APC, scholar-led journals. It’s a Knowledge Unlatched and Humboldt University project.

Philipp Hess is currently the Head of Publisher Relations at Knowledge Unlatched and is pursuing a complimentary master’s degree at the University of St. Gallen and the University of Arts Berlin in Leadership in digital Innovation. Before that he studied Engineering and Industrial Design in the Netherlands and Japan, before getting into scholarly content while working in the Management Department for Kiron, a platform that offers higher education to refugees. His goal is to make knowledge accessible to everyone, everywhere and to help shape the future dissemination of scholarly content.

Marcel Wrzesinski is an Open Access Officer at the Humboldt Institute for Internet and Society and works in the research project “Sustainable journal financing through consortial support structures in small and interdisciplinary subjects” (in cooperation with Knowledge Unlatched). Prior to this, he led Open Access activities at the International Graduate Centre for the Study of Culture (Giessen) and developed transformation strategies for gender studies at Freie Universität (Berlin). He is an editor of two open access journals, headed various working groups on digital publishing, and advises research institutions on Open Access and Open Science. His interests lie in fostering and sustaining Open Access in smaller and interdisciplinary fields….”

WordPress Saves Creative Commons Search Engine From Shutting Down

“Creative Commons Search is joining WordPress.org, which will help keep the search engine of free-to-use images running for the foreseeable future.

Matt Mullenweg, CEO of WordPress parent company Automattic, says he decided to bring CC Search on board after hearing it was in danger of shutting down….”

Podcast – Knowledge Equity Lab

“Introducing Unsettling Knowledge Inequities, a new podcast series exploring issues related to the politics of knowledge production, exchange and circulation and the structural, global power dynamics that shape it.

The Unsettling Knowledge Inequities podcast is presented by the Knowledge Equity Lab and SPARC (the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition)….”