Open Science: read our statement – News – CIVIS – A European Civic University

“CIVIS universities promote the development of new research indicators to complement the conventional indicators for research quality and impact, so as to do justice to open science practices and, going beyond pure bibliometric indicators, to promote also non-bibliometric research products. In particular, the metrics should extend the conventional bibliometric indicators in order to cover new forms of research outputs, such as research data and research software….

Incentives and Rewards for researchers to engage in Open Science activities 

Research career evaluation systems should fully acknowledge open science activities. CIVIS members encourage the inclusion of Open Science practices in their assessment mechanisms for rewards, promotion, and/or tenure, along with the Open Science Career Assessment Matrix….”

Wary EU vows to keep its research open to ‘most’ of the world | Science|Business

“Brussels presented a new global research agenda on Tuesday, committing to a more cautious approach to cooperation with foreign science powers, while at the same time pledging to reinvigorate ties with an EU-friendly US administration.

The blueprint, which has been in the works for months,  sets out “nuanced and modulated” rules of engagement with foreign countries based on “levels of reciprocity, a level playing field, and the respect for fundamental rights and shared values,” while protecting EU-funded research from those seeking to abuse the system.

Among other measures, the blue print promises:

A shift to cooperation around new strategic goals, such as the dual green and digital transition. The EU will adapt cooperation with particular countries and regions in light of this approach, giving priority to cooperation with countries in the wider European neighbourhood, to Africa, and to “like-minded” industrialised and emerging economies.
To weigh openness against the EU’s evolving pursuit of strategic autonomy, which could mean revising and limiting cooperation with certain foreign actors.
To boost the involvement of member states in setting the EU’s global science path…. 

Notably, the old ethos of “open to the world” espoused by former research commissioner Carlos Moedas is gone, to be replaced by “open to most of the world”….

Academics edge closer to dream of research on cloud platforms | Financial Times

“In the race to harness the power of cloud computing, and further develop artificial intelligence, academics have a new concern: falling behind a fast-moving tech industry. In the US, 22 higher education institutions, including Stanford and Carnegie Mellon, have signed up to a National Research Cloud initiative seeking access to the computational power they need to keep up. It is one of several cloud projects being called for by academics globally, and is being explored by the US Congress, given the potential of the technology to deliver breakthroughs in healthcare and climate change….”

 

Europe struggles to build common science area

” “This is not going to work if you want … free circulation of researchers, students and knowledge between member states,” said Kurt Deketelaere, secretary general of the League of European Research Universities. “It’s an illusion to think that you are going to create a fifth freedom without a legislative framework.”…

It can boast notable successes: E.U. member states now routinely build scientific infrastructure together, with nearly 20 billion euros ($24 billion) spent across 37 projects over the last two decades. Observers also hail big strides in open science and open access to papers….”

Sander Dekker: Open Sesame, Open Science

Special issue of Informatics Studies on the work OA/OS advocacy of Sander Dekker. 

“The current crisis around the Corona virus revealed the importance of  Open Access and Open Science – unfettered access to scientific and scholarly information, for scientists, researchers, academicians, journalists and the public alike – for effectively dealing with such calamities. It is the efforts of Sander Dekker during the last decade to implement Open Access by legislation and involvement of European Union; that made it easy for the scientific community to place their research results on Covid-19 under Open Access to arrest the spread of the pandemic.  Considering the importance of the contributions of Dekker in the efforts of humanity to sustain life on this planet; the present issue of Informatics Studies is devoted for collecting together historical documents reflecting his work, with two reviews of his career and contributions.”

EOSC Portal user survey | EOSC Portal

“The EOSC Portal is a gateway to information and resources in EOSC, providing updates on its governance and players, the projects contributing to its development and implementation, key events for the EOSC community, as well as training materials for its different components. 

The EOSC Portal Catalogue & Marketplace acts as a user-friendly entry point to the multitude of services and resources for researchers across different domains, provided by leading European and international organisations.

The Horizon 2020 project EOSC Enhance is launching an open survey targeting the entire EOSC community, to look more closely at individuals who create EOSC, understand who they are, where they come from and, most importantly, what they need in their everyday (research) activities. With this portion of knowledge, with the feedback gathered in this survey, the project wishes to capture most needed and expected enhancements that can be introduced in the next Portal release in autumn 2021. …”

Home | on-merrit

“ON-MERRIT is a 30 month project funded by the European Commission to investigate how and if open and responsible research practices could worsen existing inequalities.

Our multidisciplinary team uses qualitative and computational methods in order to examine advantages and disadvantages in Open Science and Responsible Research & Innovation (RRI). ON-MERRIT aims at eventually suggesting a set of evidence-based recommendations for science policies, indicators and incentives, which could address and mitigate cumulative (dis)advantages, so called Matthew effects.
The project acronym stands for Observing and Negating Matthew Effects in Responsible Research & Innovation Transition….”

Fostering open science to research using a taxonomy and an eLearning portal | Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Knowledge Technologies and Data-driven Business

Abstract:  The term “Open Science” is recently widely used, but it is still unclear to many research stakeholders – funders, policy makers, researchers, administrators, librarians and repository managers – how Open Science can be achieved. FOSTER (Facilitate Open Science Training for European Research) is a European Commission funded project, which is developing an e-learning portal to support the training of a wide range of stakeholders in Open Science and related areas. In 2014 the FOSTER project co-funded 28 training activities in Open Science, which include more than 110 events, while in 2015 the project has supported 24 community training events in 18 countries. In this paper, we describe the FOSTER approach in structuring the Open Science domain for educational purposes, present the functionality of the FOSTER training portal and discuss its use and potential for training the key stakeholders using self-learning and blended-learning methods.