The Howard Hughes Medical Institute joins cOAlition S | Plan S

“cOAlition S is excited to welcome the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) as the newest organisation to join cOAlition S, a consortium of research funding and performing organisations committed to delivering full and immediate Open Access to scientific publications.

Advocating for broader immediate access to published scientific research, the HHMI announced today, October 1, 2020, significant changes to its publishing policy. The new policy, which aligns with the principles of Plan S,  will take effect on January 1, 2022, and will require all HHMI laboratory heads to publish in a manner that makes their research articles freely available on the day of publication under a Creative Commons Attribution Licence (CC BY).

HHMI is the largest private biomedical research institution in the United States, spending more than $750 million annually on basic biomedical research and employing more than 2,300 employees. By launching its new policy, HHMI joins forces with cOAlition S organisations in the drive towards full and immediate open access publishing….”

HHMI Announces Open Access Publishing Policy | HHMI.org

“Advocating for broader immediate access to published scientific research, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) today announced significant changes to its publishing policy. The new policy, which will take effect on January 1, 2022, will require all HHMI laboratory heads to publish in a manner that makes their research articles freely available on the publication date under a Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY).

HHMI’s policy outlines the new requirements and a number of options that HHMI scientists have to meet this open access mandate. The goal of the policy is to ensure that when HHMI research is published, it is shared with immediate open access and without restrictions on subsequent use, enabling others to build on the work to accelerate discovery….

The new policy is HHMI’s latest step in its efforts over two decades to influence and catalyze important changes in scientific publishing that foster greater access to scientific outputs. In 2003, HHMI hosted a key meeting in which the Bethesda Statement on Open Access Publishing was drafted, leading to an early working definition of open access publication in the life sciences and biomedicine. In 2007, HHMI became one of the first research organizations in the United States to adopt a public access publishing policy. Four years later, in 2011, the Institute joined with Wellcome and the Max Planck Institute in creating the open access journal eLife. More recently, the Institute has advocated for more transparent and community-driven publishing practices, including the use of preprints as a means of making scientific research freely available and faster. It has also changed its guidelines to allow HHMI scientists to include preprints among the published research articles they submit when they undergo scientific review….”

Michael J. Fox Foundation Crafts Open Access Policy to Advance Parkinson’s Research – SPARC

“Looking to do the most good with its donor contributions and speed the pace of progress to help people living with Parkinson’s disease, The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research (MJFF) recently adopted a progressive open access policy. It serves as a model to funders that want to broaden the dissemination of research results and advance scientific discovery.

As of March 2, the foundation requires that all articles resulting from work it has funded be published in a preprint repository, then in an open access forum under the Creative Commons license (CC BY 4.0) or equivalent license. The policy also mandates any data, code or software needed for independent verification of research results also be made freely available in an open repository. 

To ensure that the policy takes hold, MJFF will cover the article processing charges (APCs) of open access publication, including the publication of articles resulting from past MJFF research grants. The foundation requires grantees to provide proof of compliance, and adherence to the policy is required for subsequent funding. …”

Michael J. Fox Foundation Crafts Open Access Policy to Advance Parkinson’s Research – SPARC

“Looking to do the most good with its donor contributions and speed the pace of progress to help people living with Parkinson’s disease, The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research (MJFF) recently adopted a progressive open access policy. It serves as a model to funders that want to broaden the dissemination of research results and advance scientific discovery.

As of March 2, the foundation requires that all articles resulting from work it has funded be published in a preprint repository, then in an open access forum under the Creative Commons license (CC BY 4.0) or equivalent license. The policy also mandates any data, code or software needed for independent verification of research results also be made freely available in an open repository. 

To ensure that the policy takes hold, MJFF will cover the article processing charges (APCs) of open access publication, including the publication of articles resulting from past MJFF research grants. The foundation requires grantees to provide proof of compliance, and adherence to the policy is required for subsequent funding. …”

Arcadia Fund | Our response to UKRI’s open access review consultation – Arcadia Fund

“The publisher must make efforts to advertise the existence of a freely available version on the DOI-landing page of the publisher version of the work, and in all metadata supplied in the form of MARC records, ONIX feeds, and CrossRef DOI associated metadata. The licence of the work should be clearly given on the DOI-landing page and in all forms of associated metadata that the publisher supplies be it MARC or ONIX or DOI or all. If the publisher is known to not provide adequate metadata about open access and open access licensing, then withhold all Book Publishing Charges from that publisher until they provide it. Better still, warn authors not to submit to the publisher with a ‘blacklist’ of non-compliant publishers.

Some publishers both in journals and in monographs have been doing rather sneaky things to hide the existence of a freely accessible version. See Piwowar (2018) ‘Where’s Waldo With Public Access Links’. For ‘gold’ open access works, ensure the publisher creates a link from which the entirety of the book can be downloaded as PDF (or other format e.g. EPUB) in one-click – far too many platforms break-up books into chapters with absolutely no provision of a link to download the work in its entirety – this is annoying for users….”

The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research Adopts Open Access Publication Policy | New York | curated.tncontentexchange.com

“In keeping with its core values of transparency and scientific collaboration to accelerate the development of new treatments, The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research (MJFF) is adopting a formal policy requiring that all articles resulting from work it has funded be published in a preprint repository then an open access forum….”

What HHMI Scientists Think About Scientific Publishing | HHMI.org

“HHMI works to discover and share scientific knowledge. We believe that science is a public good. Should new research be shared freely, widely, and quickly? We asked our scientists what they think….

Finding 1 – Most surveyed scientists see significant challenges with scientific publishing today and generally favor open access over subscription….

Finding 2 – The scientists are divided on whether they oppose or favor a policy requiring them to publish open access, which would restrict their publication choices….

Finding 3 – When considering a policy requiring them to publish open access, the scientists’ top concern was that trainees will find it more difficult to obtain tenure-track academic positions if they cannot publish in prestigious journals that are currently subscription-based….

Finding 4 – The majority of Group Leaders at HHMI’s Janelia Research Campus who took the survey report posting or reading preprints, with a lower proportion of HHMI Investigators and trainees doing so. Scientists are split on whether they oppose or favor a requirement to publish preprints….”

ORFG Members Join White House Office of Science and Technology Policy to Align Research Incentives — Open Research Funders Group

“On February 28, 2020, the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), the National Science and Technology Council Rigor and Integrity in Research Subcommittee, and the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM) Roundtable on Aligning Incentives for Open Science held a joint meeting on aligning incentives in support of research integrity, reproducibility, and openness. The meeting including perspectives from a number of Open Research Funders Group members, including the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, Arnold Ventures, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the James S. McDonnell Foundation, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and Wellcome Trust.

Points of consensus from the meeting, as reported by OSTP, include the following:

– Research has its widest impact and is most trustworthy when its methodology and analysis are well-designed and the interpretation and reporting of results are clearly and transparently articulated.

– As stakeholders in the research endeavor, Federal agencies, academic institutions, philanthropic organizations, and publishers should work to ensure that the performance and reporting of the research that we fund, support, and communicate is consistent with this view of impact.

– The consistency and impact of research would be maximized by aligning our credit and reward systems, such as hiring and tenure and promotion processes, with rigorous, transparent, and open research practices.

– Federal agencies, academic institutions, philanthropic organizations, and publishers could enhance research rigor, integrity, openness, and transparency by actively aligning these systems and striving to coordinate policies and procedures….”

Taking action to help researchers -Gates Open Research Blog

“The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation launched it’s Open Access policy in 2015 marking a point where we joined a global effort to prioritize open access to research knowledge with aims to accelerate finding solutions to the world’s most pressing problems. The Wellcome Trust first partnered with F1000 to launch Wellcome Open Research and they shared their experience with the foundation (see the story here). Intrigued by the F1000 model, the foundation followed in Wellcome’s footsteps to launch it’s own open platform for it’s grantees. It has been one of my favourite initiatives associated with the foundation’s open access work. As a librarian, it is part of my ethos to help people access the information they need and to ensure quality information is widely available to all. …”