WILL PODCASTING AND SOCIAL MEDIA REPLACE JOURNALS AND TRADITIONAL SCIENCE COMMUNICATION? NO, BUT… | American Journal of Epidemiology | Oxford Academic

Abstract:  The digital world in which we live is changing rapidly. The changing media environment is having a direct impact on traditional forms of communication and knowledge translation in public health and epidemiology. Openly accessible digital media can be used to reach a broader and more diverse audience of trainees, scientists, and the lay public than traditional forms of scientific communication. The new digital landscape for delivering content is vast and new platforms are continuously being added. We focus on several, including Twitter and podcasting and discuss their relevance to epidemiology and science communication. We highlight three key reasons why we think epidemiologists should be engaging with these mediums: 1) science communication, 2) career advancement, 3) development of a community and public service. Other positive and negative consequences of engaging in these forms of new media are also discussed. The authors of this commentary are all engaged in social media and podcasting for scientific communication and in this manuscript, we reflect on our experience with these mediums as tools to advance the field of epidemiology.

 

2021 SSP Webinar: The Article of the Future Revisited

“With the 2010 introduction of their “Article Future” format, Cell Press created a new container for research that included supporting data, centered user needs, and reflected the need for more snackable and sharable content. These elements of the Article of the Future have since become widely adopted and are now seen as the norm, so what’s next? This webinar will feature speakers who are leveraging user behavior to explore new and more valuable ways to communicate research and the research process. Representing publishers and aggregators across business models and disciplines, they will examine current projects that are expanding our concept of the journal article and discuss what the next 10 years may bring.”

Multilingualism within Scholarly Communication… | Balula | JLIS.it

Abstract:  It is undeniable that scholarly publication is boosted nowadays by the use of the English language, but this does not (and cannot) mean that the other languages have to be obliterated as scientific and cultural agents, equally valid and indispensable. Therefore, multilingualism is an expression of bibliodiversity that has to be protected and cherished, particularly in the area of  Social  Sciences  and  Humanities  (SSH),  a  field  in  which  culturally  and  societally  relevant  studies  are  made  in  local languages, when approaching areas such as cultural heritage, education, migration, public administration. The main goal of this paper is to present a literature review in order to identify the main aspects influencing language selection and the useof multilingualism within scholarly communication, allowing for putting forward recommendations for future initiatives aiming at enhancing multilingualism, particularly in connection with the opportunities deriving from Open Science.

Investing in the Open Access Book infrastructure: a call for action – Jisc Research

Investing in the Open Access Book infrastructure: a call for action

 

This is a guest blog post by Pierre Mounier, Jeroen Sondervan, and Graham Stone.

Join Pierre Mounier (EHESS, OpenEdition, OPERAS), Jeroen Sondervan (Knowledge Exchange Open Access Working Group and Utrecht University Library), Graham Stone (Jisc), and key stakeholders in signing a position paper calling for investment in the open access book infrastructure (Zenodo version of record, Google doc version for signatories).

In June 2020, we published a blog Open Access to academic books: Working towards the “tipping point”, which reflected on the work of the Knowledge Exchange (KE) task and finish group’s work around open access books (see “Towards a Roadmap for Open Access Monographs: A Knowledge Exchange Report”. The blogpost led to a number of valuable discussions with stakeholders and key experts in the OA books community regarding the need to develop a joined up approach to the open infrastructure required for a successful transition to open access for books.

In light of forthcoming (and existing) policy on open access for books, the KE task and finish group agreed to extend their work on open access books by facilitating a partner exchange in February 2021. This one-day virtual workshop gathered key stakeholders, including representatives of cOAlition S, SPARC Europe, OASPA, OAPEN, DARIAH-EU, OpenAIRE, national funders, KE partner organizations and many more.

After a brief overview, the day used a workshop approach to develop a common understanding on the need for further attention and support for open access for academic books. Delegates explored the key issues in three parallel sessions (OA Book Watch, OA Book Network, OA Book infrastructure), before a Mentimeter poll was used to prioritise areas for further discussion. At the end of a long day of vibrant and fruitful discussion, we took stock of the contributions and discussed the idea of a position paper on open access books infrastructure. A writing group was formed and we started work on the position paper.

Director, Office of Scholarly Communication – Stanford University Careers

“Stanford Libraries seeks a full-time Director for the Office of Scholarly Communications, a unit that will support the Open Access Policy passed by Stanford University’s Faculty Senate in November 2020.  With the passage of the OA Policy, the entire focus of which is academic articles, the University is poised to quickly move forward in support of open scholarship, increased access to scholarly information, and transforming the academic article publishing landscape. …”

University of Maryland PACT (Publishing, Access, and Contract Terms)

“As the state of Maryland’s flagship institution and one of the nation’s preeminent public research universities, we are committed to action that will make Maryland’s research more visible, accessible, affordable, and transparent….

Our current scholarly publishing and communication ecosystem is in crisis. University of Maryland researchers are on the front lines of developing innovative solutions to urgent problems that threaten the well-being and health of the planet and people across the globe. Yet, trends in international publishing make it increasingly difficult to provide equitable access to the publicly funded research that can help our communities thrive and make our lives better. Learn how you can take action and be part of the movement for open and equitable scholarship….”

OAI12 – OAI

“Scholarly publishing is highly diverse and constantly changing. Over the previous decades it has responded to a number of large challenges on the global and local levels. In this session we aim to take a snapshot of the current status of the industry with a global perspective and explore emerging models of open publishing. Which open access strategies can work together, and which lead to conflict? How do we value the diversity of models, and where do we need clear and more uniform strategies? What challenges do scholar-led, community-owned publishing initiatives face? What impact can we expect from transformative agreements and other big deals in the different regions of the world? Are the Plan S principles applicable worldwide, are they necessary or sufficient? How sustainable are existing open access strategies and business models? ”

Librarian for Scholarly Communications Job Opening in Nashville, Tennessee – ALA JobLIST | Jobs in Library & Information Science & Technology

“The Librarian for Scholarly Communications supports Open research, communication, and data on the Vanderbilt University campus through education, training, and analysis. As a member of the Digital Scholarship and Communications (DiSC) Office, the Librarian for Scholarly Communications consults with faculty, students, and staff about emergent scholarly communications models, analyzes faculty publishing patterns and impact metrics, and evaluates and advises on research communication tools. The Librarian for Scholarly Communications also manages the institutional repository, coordinating the ingestion workflow in dialogue with liaison librarians in the divisional libraries, and with LTDS in software development….”