Open Science nonprofit OurResearch receives $4.5M grant from Arcadia Fund – OurResearch blog

“The grant, which follows an 2018 award for $850,000, will help expand two existing open-source software projects, as well as support the launch of two new ones:

Unpaywall, launched in 2017, has become the world’s most-used index of Open Access (OA) scholarly papers. The free Unpaywall extension has 400,000 active users, and its underlying database powers OA-related features in dozens of other tools including Web of Science, Scopus, and the European Open Science Monitor. All Unpaywall data is free and open.
Unsub is an analytics dashboard that helps academic libraries cancel their large journal subscriptions, freeing up money for OA publishing. Launched in late 2019, Unsub is now used by over 500 major libraries in the US and worldwide, including the national library consortia of Canada, Australia, Greece, Hong Kong, and the UK. 
JournalsDB will be a free and open database of scholarly journals. This resource will gather a wide range of data on tens of thousands of journals, emphasizing coverage of emerging open venues. 
OpenAlex will be a free and open bibliographic database, cataloging papers, authors, affiliations, citations, and journals. Inspired by the ancient Library of Alexandria, OpenAlex will strive to create a comprehensive map of the global scholarly conversation.  In a recent blog post, the team announced that OpenAlex will be released in time to serve as a replacement for Microsoft Academic Graph, whose discontinuation was also recently announced….”

We’re building a replacement for Microsoft Academic Graph – Our Research blog

“This week Microsoft Research announced that their free bibliographic database–Microsoft Academic Graph, or MAG for short–is being discontinued. This is sad news, because MAG was a great source of open scholcomm metadata, including citation counts and author affiliations. MAG data is used in Unsub, as well as several other well-known open science tools.

Thankfully, we’ve got a contingency plan for this situation, which we’ve been working on for a while now. We’re building a successor to MAG. Like all our projects, it’ll be open-source and the data will be free to everyone via data dump and API. It will launch at the end of the year, when MAG is scheduled to disappear.

It’s important to note that this new service will not be a perfect replacement, especially right when it launches. MAG has excellent support for conference proceedings, for example; we won’t match that for a while, if ever.  Instead, we’ll be focusing on supporting the most important use-cases, and building out from there. If you use MAG today, we’d love to hear what your key use-cases are, so we can prioritize accordingly. Here’s where you can tell us.

We plan to have this launched by the time MAG disappears at year’s end. That’s an aggressive schedule, but we’ve built and launched other large projects (Unpaywall, Unsub) in less time. We’ve also got a good head start, since we’ve been working toward this as an internal project for a while now….”

Tilting the balance back towards libraries | Research Information

Jason Priem tells of his hopes for a ‘long-overdue’ change in academic publishing.

“This presents a compelling opportunity for us as OA advocates: by helping libraries quantify the alternatives to toll-access publishing, we can empower librarians to cancel multi-million dollar big deals. This in turn will begin to turn off the faucet of money flowing from universities to toll-access publishing houses. In short: by helping libraries cancel big deals, we can make toll-access publishing less profitable, and accelerate the transition toward universal OA.”

An interview with Heather Piwowar, Co-founder, Open Research, Canada | Zenodo

“This is one of a series of interviews to share insights into the sustainability of open infrastructure services.

These interviews were conducted in the Spring/Summer of 2020. This is an Invest in Open Infrastructure Project: https;//investinopen.org.

This work is supported by Open Society Foundations and SPARC Europe, in collaboration with Invest in Open Infrastructure.

For more on this work see https://sparceurope.org/ioiinterviews …”

Unsub Gives Libraries Powerful Evidence to Walk Away from Big Deals – SPARC

“Heather Piwowar and Jason Priem are working non-stop to accelerate the pace of the open science revolution.

The pair co-founded the non-profit organization Our Research, which recently developed and debuted Unsub, a data dashboard and forecasting tool that helps academic libraries cut their subscriptions to expensive bundles of toll-access journals….

Unsub (formerly known as Unpaywall Journals) has widely been hailed as a game changer in the scholarly communications market, providing institutions with the leverage they need when negotiating with publishers over journal subscription packages.  The tool forecasts the value and costs of individual journals to specific institutions, leveling the playing field for the first time for libraries when conducting negotiations with publishers….”

Taking a Big Bite Out of the Big Deal – The Scholarly Kitchen

“Unsub is the game-changing data analysis service that is helping librarians forecast, explore, and optimize their alternatives to the Big Deal. Unsub (known as Unpaywall Journals until just this week) supports librarians in making independent assessments of the value of their journal subscriptions relative to price paid rather than relying upon publisher-provided data alone. Librarians breaking away from the Big Deal often credit Unsub as a critical component of their strategy. I am grateful to Heather Piwowar and Jason Priem, co-founders of Our Research, a small nonprofit organization with an innocuous sounding name that is the provider of Unsub, for taking time to answer some questions for the benefit of the readers of The Scholarly Kitchen. …”

Introducing new open access data in Journal Citation Reports – Web of Science Group

“The research?publishing?landscape is undergoing rapid change,?disrupting the longstanding dominance of the subscription model and replacing it with open access models.?Funders, librarians and publishers are looking to?improve?transparency?of?open access, with?publishers under increasing pressure to eliminate or shorten embargoes, improve open access options and to ‘flip’ traditional subscription or hybrid journals to?make?all research?articles?freely accessible and reusable upon publication via a Creative Commons license – usually referred to as gold OA.

To help the research community navigate through this complex transition, we have added open access data to Journal Citation Reports (JCR) profile pages?to?increase transparency around?how much of the scholarly literature is published using the gold OA model, and how much of this content is being cited. This will help the research community better understand the contribution of gold OA content to the literature and its influence on scholarly discourse….

The new descriptive feature uses Our Research (formerly ImpactStory) data to identify content published under a Creative Commons license (gold OA) and allows it to be easily differentiated from subscription or free to read content (which may not be free to re-use.) This?provides?funders,?publishers, librarians,?and?researchers?with transparent, publisher-neutral information about the relative contribution of gold OA articles to a journal’s overall volume of content and citations.?The feature is in beta until the release?of?the 2020 Journal Citation Reports?in June….”

Introducing new open access data in Journal Citation Reports – Web of Science Group

“The research?publishing?landscape is undergoing rapid change,?disrupting the longstanding dominance of the subscription model and replacing it with open access models.?Funders, librarians and publishers are looking to?improve?transparency?of?open access, with?publishers under increasing pressure to eliminate or shorten embargoes, improve open access options and to ‘flip’ traditional subscription or hybrid journals to?make?all research?articles?freely accessible and reusable upon publication via a Creative Commons license – usually referred to as gold OA.

To help the research community navigate through this complex transition, we have added open access data to Journal Citation Reports (JCR) profile pages?to?increase transparency around?how much of the scholarly literature is published using the gold OA model, and how much of this content is being cited. This will help the research community better understand the contribution of gold OA content to the literature and its influence on scholarly discourse….

The new descriptive feature uses Our Research (formerly ImpactStory) data to identify content published under a Creative Commons license (gold OA) and allows it to be easily differentiated from subscription or free to read content (which may not be free to re-use.) This?provides?funders,?publishers, librarians,?and?researchers?with transparent, publisher-neutral information about the relative contribution of gold OA articles to a journal’s overall volume of content and citations.?The feature is in beta until the release?of?the 2020 Journal Citation Reports?in June….”