Rights, sharing, and embargo policies

“Cell Press supports responsible sharing. We recognize that authors want to share their papers and we encourage this. Find out how you can share your paper here: www.elsevier.com/sharing-articles .

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There are, however, some differences between Elsevier’s general policies and those of Cell Press. Most Cell Press articles are under a press embargo until the article is published because we generate substantial media coverage for relevant articles….

We are happy to consider manuscripts previously posted on preprint servers such as arXiv(opens in a new window), bioRxiv(opens in a new window), BioRN(opens in a new window), ChiRxiv(opens in a new window), ChiRN(opens in a new window), or SSRN(opens in a new window). Some of our journals, including Cell Genomics, Cell Reports, Current Biology, and iScience, also support direct submission of manuscripts from bioRxiv and/or medRxiv via transfer of manuscript files and metadata to the journal’s Editorial Manager site. Our support for posting of preprints only applies to the original submitted version of the manuscript; we do not support posting to preprint servers revisions that respond to editorial input and peer review or final accepted manuscripts….

For authors submitting from January 2021 onwards all Cell Press journals offer an open access publishing option. We have a range of journals that are either full open access, where all articles are published on an open access basis, or hybrid open access, which offer a choice between subscription and open access publishing.

Authors of papers published by Cell Press can share their accepted manuscript (the post-peer-review version that does not incorporate copy editing and proofing) via non-commercial hosting platforms, such as their institutional repository, after a posting embargo period has elapsed (this is distinct from the press embargo mentioned above)….

Cell Press open access and hybrid research journals support open access publication for groups of authors from Research4Life (R4L) countries. For papers where all of the authors are from a Group A and/or Group B R4L country we will grant a waiver or discount of the standard publishing fee, as appropriate. For fully open access journals the R4L eligibility check will be automatic. For hybrid journals please highlight your situation to the journal team during the submission process so we can adjust accordingly….”

Interview: Cell Genomics

“I am most excited that we are able to publish as a gold open access journal and am grateful to Cell Press for this. It is fitting that we are the first premier research journal to adopt this publishing model, as genomics has pioneered open access. For a field in which the foundation has been based on open access resources and methods, it is essential that the publications are also open access without restrictions, so as to provide broader and more equitable access to this research in ways that drive the progress of science across many fields.

I am equally excited to launch Cell Genomics as an open science journal, providing leadership with best practices in data availability, sharing, and standards. Beyond our publications, we also work with our scientific communities to support open science initiatives in ways that address current challenges and drive progress in genomics and broader scientific research….”

Plant Communications: An Open Access Venue for Communicating Diverse Plant Science Discoveries – ScienceDirect

“With the coming of the new year 2020, we are pleased to invite you to join us in celebrating the birth of a new plant science journal, Plant Communications, by reading this editorial. Together with Cell Press, a well-known life science publisher, we are launching Plant Communications as an open access journal sister to Molecular Plant, one of the leading plant science journals, which has published cutting-edge research for 12 years along with continuously improved services to the global plant science community….”

Elsevier Expands Open Access Options for Cell Press Journals from January 2021 | STM Publishing News

“Elsevier, a global leader in research publishing and information analytics, today announced that the Cell Press portfolio of journals will be expanding open access publishing options for authors from 1 January 2021….

In enabling more open access, our principle is always to offer substantial value to the scientific community relative to the quality and rigour of the editorial and publishing services we provide.  As a result, for those titles that do not currently offer an open access publishing option, the article publishing charges (APCs) will be£7,000/ €7,600 /$8,900 for the majority of journals, and £7,800/€8,500/$9,900 for our flagship title, Cell. We will align our existing Cell Press APCs for hybrid journals with these new publishing charges….”

Elsevier Expands Open Access Options for Cell Press Journals from January 2021 | STM Publishing News

“Elsevier, a global leader in research publishing and information analytics, today announced that the Cell Press portfolio of journals will be expanding open access publishing options for authors from 1 January 2021….

In enabling more open access, our principle is always to offer substantial value to the scientific community relative to the quality and rigour of the editorial and publishing services we provide.  As a result, for those titles that do not currently offer an open access publishing option, the article publishing charges (APCs) will be£7,000/ €7,600 /$8,900 for the majority of journals, and £7,800/€8,500/$9,900 for our flagship title, Cell. We will align our existing Cell Press APCs for hybrid journals with these new publishing charges….”

Crispr pioneer among University of California researchers boycotting Elsevier | News | Chemistry World

“31 members of Cell Press editorial boards at the University of California (UC) have suspended their ‘editorial services’ to Elsevier as part of an on-going dispute between the university and publishing giant over the cost of journal subscriptions and open access. Among the signatories is Jennifer Doudna, one of the original developers of the Crispr gene-editing technique.

The open letter to Elsevier follows the collapse of negotiations to renew a contract between the university and the publishing giant in March, leading to the University of California cancelling its contract across its 10 campuses. The university sought reduced journal subscription costs and for all work published by its researchers in Elsevier’s journals to be open access, but the publisher refused. Last year, the university spent over $10.5 million (£8.3 million) in subscription and open access fees. Elsevier cut off the University of California’s access to newly published articles in July….”

UCCellPressEditorialBoardSuspensionsAlphabetical – Google Docs

“The undersigned University of California scientist members of Cell Press editorial boards are writing to inform you of our position, in light of the current impasse in negotiations between the University and Elsevier. We value our long-standing relationships with Cell and other Cell Press journals, which have helped make and keep these journals at the forefront of scientific publishing. These journals have in turn been of service as standard bearers of excellence to the life sciences community as a whole.

We therefore wish to express our concern at the current lack of a contract between UC and Elsevier, and the decision to deny our UC colleagues access to research published in Cell Press and other Elsevier journals. 

Pending the signing of a new contract with UC, we wish to inform you that we are suspending our editorial services to Cell Press journals. We very much hope to hear of an appropriate resolution and resume our productive relationships with Cell Press….”

UC Faculty Protest Elsevier by Suspending Work for Cell Press | The Scientist Magazine®

“Faculty members at a number University of California schools have stopped serving on the editorial boards of journals published by Cell Press in protest of its parent company, Elsevier, not having reached a dealwith UC for access to its publications. The 31 signatories of a letter to Elsevier, posted yesterday (August 7) online, write that unless Elsevier and UC can agree upon a new contract, they will not serve on the boards of Cell, Neuron, Immunity, Current Biology, and others…..