Opening the Future: A New Model for Open Access Books

“CEU Press is going Open Access.

CEU Press welcomes members as we aim to convert to a fully OA monograph frontlist. In return, you will receive access to some of the most popular titles from CEUP’s extensive backlist. By purchasing access to the backlist, you can fund CEU Press’s future to be open access….”

Open Library Foundation

“The Open Library Foundation enables the development, accessibility and sustainability of open source and open access projects for and by libraries. The Foundation seeks to enable and support creative collaboration among librarians, technologists, designers, service providers and vendors to share expertise and resources and to create innovative new software and resources that support libraries….”

 

Publishing Open Access in Cambridge Journals

“Open Access (OA) was once a disruptive new approach promoted by a few passionate advocates who believed that access to and ability to reuse research was fundamental to accelerating knowledge. Today, more and more researchers are choosing to publish their research OA as interest, understanding and awareness of this mode of scholarly communication continues to grow.

Join our Editorial Team as they guide you through the basics of OA, highlight key benefits, and present evidence of the increased impact of choosing this option….”

Libraries Collaborates for Open Access to Archive of Prominent Urdu Writer and Activist | University of Texas Libraries | The University of Texas at Austin

The comprehensive works of influential Urdu writer, social critic and political activist Sajjad Zaheer are now broadly accessible for scholarship and study thanks to a partnership between The University of Texas at Austin and Ambedkar University Delhi (AUD), with endorsement from the Indian writer’s estate.

The AUPresses Global Partner Program Begins: An Interview with the Partner Presses

A pilot program that seeks to deepen transnational dialogue and collaboration among mission-driven scholarly publishers.

The post The AUPresses Global Partner Program Begins: An Interview with the Partner Presses appeared first on The Scholarly Kitchen.

Librarian for Scholarly Communications Job Opening in Nashville, Tennessee – ALA JobLIST | Jobs in Library & Information Science & Technology

“The Librarian for Scholarly Communications supports Open research, communication, and data on the Vanderbilt University campus through education, training, and analysis. As a member of the Digital Scholarship and Communications (DiSC) Office, the Librarian for Scholarly Communications consults with faculty, students, and staff about emergent scholarly communications models, analyzes faculty publishing patterns and impact metrics, and evaluates and advises on research communication tools. The Librarian for Scholarly Communications also manages the institutional repository, coordinating the ingestion workflow in dialogue with liaison librarians in the divisional libraries, and with LTDS in software development….”

Why hybrid journals do not lead to full and immediate Open Access | Plan S

“In this brief note, we formulate 6 arguments that articulate why cOAlition S Organisations will not financially support the hybrid model of publishing. We define a hybrid Open Access journal as a subscription journal in which some of the original research papers are Open Access while others are only accessible via payment or subscription. …

Argument 1: Hybrid has not facilitated a transition to Open Access (OA)…

Argument 2: The research community pays twice (double dipping)…

Argument 3: Hybrid journals are more expensive than fully OA journals…

Argument 4: Hybrid journals provide a poor quality of service…

Argument 5: Hybrid journals crowd out new, full OA publishing models…

Argument 6: Reader access: a hybrid journal is a “random OA” journal…

The arguments developed here provide the rationale for why cOAlition S Organisations have decided not to financially support hybrid journals unless these journals adopt a transformative arrangement that will lead them towards full and immediate OA by December 2024. In the meantime, these arrangements must ensure that OA publication fees are properly offset against subscription fees, so as to avoid any double-dipping. Publishers will only “bite the bullet” and start exploring new OA publishing models when they realize that the hybrid model is no longer a viable option.”

Balancing local & global in open science policies | EIFL

“How to design open science policies that address local needs, and are at the same time aligned with regional – for example, African or European – priorities? I face this question every time I get involved in new open science policy development initiatives. And usually there is more than one answer, depending on the policy context….

Open access to publications – repository deposits, immediate open access under a CC-BY licence, alignment with the cOAlition S Right Retention strategy and Horizon Europe requirements, and linking to research assessment and evaluation: 

 

Require researchers to deposit in a repository a machine-readable electronic copy of the full-text (published article or final peer-reviewed manuscript) before or at the time of publication. 
Retain ownership of copyright, and licence to publishers only those rights necessary for publication. Authors (or their organizations) must ensure open access to the Author Accepted Manuscripts or the Version of Record of research articles at the time of publication. All research articles must be made available under a Creative Commons Attribution CC BY licence or equivalent or, by exception, a Creative Commons Attribution, NoDerivatives CC BY-ND licence, or equivalent. For monographs, deposit remains mandatory, but access could be closed.
For purposes of individual or institutional evaluation of research output, full texts of publications must be deposited in the repository….”

“Exploring Open Access Practices, Attitudes, and Policies in Academic L” by Rachel E. Scott, Caitlin Harrington et al.

Abstract: This article reports the results of a 2019 survey of academic librarians that investigated their attitudes, practices, and policies regarding open access (OA). This study asks if academic librarians write policies to ensure that they approach OA intentionally and systematically across all library services. The results indicate that, though librarians report favorable beliefs about OA and integrating OA into technical and public services, they seldom create OA policies.