Actions on Retractions: An Interview with Jodi Schneider

In today’s post, Alice Meadows interviews Jodi Schneider of the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign about the work she’s leading to reduce the inadvertent spread of retracted research.

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Why We Should All Care about Early Career Pay Equity and Inclusion: An Interview with Becca Bostock and Dominique J. Moore

Learn how two early career publishers are tackling the thorny issue of pay equity and inclusion in today’s interview with Rebecca Bostock (Ohio State UP) and Dominique J Moore (University of Illinois Press)

The post Why We Should All Care about Early Career Pay Equity and Inclusion: An Interview with Becca Bostock and Dominique J. Moore appeared first on The Scholarly Kitchen.

How One Society Is Supporting Peer Review Excellence in their Community: An Interview with Laura Feetham of IOP Publishing

In today’s post, Alice Meadows talks to Laura Feetham of IOP Publishing about their work to improve peer review quality in the physical sciences through their ongoing peer review excellence program.

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Joint Commitment for Action on Inclusion and Diversity in Publishing: An Interview with Laura Norton and Nicola Nugent of the RSC

Laura Norton and Nicola Nugent of the Royal Society of Chemistry answer Alice Meadows’s questions about the RSC’s Joint Commitment for action on inclusion and diversity in publishing

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Beyond Open: Expanding Access to Scholarly Content

Although open access has only recently become established as a business model, publishers have been providing some degree of public access to content for much longer—primarily through philanthropic programs. These programs are intended to provide readers who can’t afford to pay for a subscription (such as researchers in developing countries, patients, and their caregivers) with access to the content they need. In many cases, this access is completely free of charge; in others, it is very deeply discounted. This paper will describe and, where possible, evaluate some of the major public/low-cost access initiatives, as well as consider some possible ways forward.