Seeking UX Consultant – Scaling Up a Collaborative Consortial Institutional Repository

“Hyku for Consortia seeks a UX Consultant to work with project staff to develop and implement a series of user research activities determining the most useful updates for the Samvera-based Hyku digital repository software. 

The UX Consultant will determine the best activities for the project goals, develop resources and plans for activities, carry them out with selected candidates, and assist in the analysis of results. Research activities may include surveys, interviews, focus groups, usability tests or other related feedback mechanisms. The Consultant will work closely with and have the support of the project team to accomplish their goals. Prior experience with user research, excellent communication skills, and attention to detail will be essential in this role….”

Open Access Librarian

“The Emory University Libraries seek an Open Access Librarian to contribute to our growing scholarly communications program and to further our commitment to open access (OA) and open educational practices (OEPs). The ideal candidate will be someone who is interested in helping us develop innovative approaches to OA and OEP outreach, promotion, and education; who shares the Libraries’ commitment to social justice; who is committed to student and faculty success; and who is able to work successfully in a collaborative environment….”

What has the pandemic taught us about “Open Science”? | Berlin Science Week 2021

“The European Commission has made Open Science a policy priority because it “improves the quality, efficiency and responsiveness of research” and can increase creativity and “trust in science”. For nearly two years now the COVID-19 pandemic has put this vision of “Open Science” to the test.

With this panel discussion we will ask experts from research, publishing, science communication and journalism to share their thoughts on how central tenets of Open Science such as open data, open access, citizen science/public engagement, preprints, open review and alternative metrics fared during the turbo-charge race to understand a new virus. What effects have new Open Science practices had on the speed, quality and quantity of research and its translation into actionable solutions and policies? What unexpected challenges of openness have emerged in the pandemic? Finally, the thorny question that this panel will attempt to answer is whether Open Science can increase trust in science. Join the discussion in person in Berlin at the Humboldt Institute for Internet and Society….”

Florida State University Libraries debuts new digital project hosting service | Florida State University Libraries

“Florida State University Libraries announces the launch of CreateFSU, a new web-hosting service for digital research projects.

CreateFSU allows faculty, students and staff to host and publish websites related to their digital research and pedagogy projects using cutting-edge and industry-standard web publishing tools. Created to supplement FSU’s existing web-hosting services for faculty, students and departments, CreateFSU provides researchers and instructors with the ability to build a digital presence for projects spanning from interactive maps and visualizations to collaborative course blogs and digital museum exhibits….

Each user is provided with a unique domain name and given access to a dashboard with several different applications, including WordPress, MediaWiki, Scalar, Omeka (digital library) and Drupal. Once installed, these applications give users the freedom to create blogs, publish videos, author books and share research data….”

SPARC Europe to facilitate high-level European OS policymaker group CoNOSC – SPARC Europe

“SPARC Europe is honoured to support the Council for National Open Science Coordination (CoNOSC) in their efforts to advance national European Open Science policies. The CoNOSC mission is to help countries create, update and cooordinate their national open science policies by sharing valuable insights from the network.

SPARC Europe will work with the CoNOSC group at least until the end of 2022. We will investigate the needs of today’s national Open Science (OS) policymakers and organise strategic OS policy meetings with high-level national OS Co-ordinators and ministry representatives to determine priorities for the coming year. We will facilitate discussion around important OS policy topics and showcase policy developments and outcomes to help resolve common challenges and stimulate synergies. We will also help build and expand the CoNOSC network….”

CoNOSC – Council for National Open Science Coordination

“On 21 October 2019, in Helsinki, France, the Netherlands and Finland invited representatives of the ERAC countries to discuss the creation of a network of open science coordination. The program of the day is included. Twenty-one countries were present, as well as the European Union. Participants agreed that it was necessary to create such a network to enable the coordination of national efforts in the field of open science.

The objectives and organizational principles of this network, which we have named ‘Council for National Open Science Coordination’ (CoNOSC), are specified in the attached Memorandum of Understanding. Here is the summary:

 

 

– CoNOSC helps to fill  in the gaps in national open science coordination.

– CoNOSC will provide a valuable insights through the dialogue with other international partners.

– CoNOSC membership is in principle open to all countries within the European Research Area….”

Scilit – Scientific & Scholarly Research Database

“Scilit is a comprehensive content aggregator platform for scholarly publications. It is developed and maintained by the open access publisher MDPI AG. It is offered for free to scientists and scholars. Using widely automated approaches to sourcing and curating data, we cover newly published content from a variety of sources within hours or days. Scilit currently covers journal articles, book chapters, monographs and preprints. For more information, please see the Scilit brochure….”

Opposing the Merger Between Clarivate PLC and ProQuest LLC

“The proposed merger between Clarivate and ProQuest is likely to produce adverse competitive effects described in the Horizontal Merger Guidelines and result in foreseeable harm to consumers related to product quality, price, choice, and privacy. The merger would significantly decrease competition across key markets, resulting in a research enterprise increasingly dominated by a very small number of firms with extraordinary market power, relative to both their competitors and customers. Blocking this merger is a necessary step in pulling the research enterprise back from the brink of a future in which it is controlled by platform monopolies.”

How to access Pew Research Center survey data | Pew Research Center

“Pew Research Center regularly makes the full datasets behind our survey reports available to the public for free. In this post, we’ll explain exactly how you can download these datasets and begin to analyze our survey findings yourself.

We typically do not publish datasets at the same time as we publish reports, and the lag time varies by study. That’s because it takes some time for us to complete all of our own reporting for a given study and to prepare the data for public release. We “clean” our survey datasets in this way to make them easier to use and to remove any information that could be used to identify individual poll respondents. Protecting confidentiality also means we never release some datasets of rare populations (for instance, surveys of scientists or foreign policy experts)….”

College of DuPage’s human services program adopts open educational resources to lower textbook costs for students

“Eager to expand access to educational opportunities, the Human Services program at College of DuPage is taking advantage of the college’s Open Educational Resources (OER) program.

To date, more than half of all Human Services classes at COD utilize OER to make attending college more affordable for students….”

Proudly Serving: Default to open – Google Docs

Overview

Openness is a mindset and culture. It creates opportunities for exponential government innovation. By embracing the values of collaboration, participation and transparency, government can instill trust and foster better and faster solutions to small and big problems.

The problem

Governments that isolate processes and decision-making from the public limit the opportunity to truly create government with, for and by the people. By taking an insular approach to service, we don’t leverage the collective wisdom and energy of the public. The opaqueness leads to ambivalence and mistrust.

The solution

A government culture of ‘open by default’ that publicly shares its information and processes and actively solicits feedback. By creating mechanisms that encourage the public to engage early and often, we develop opportunities for increased engagement in the context of trust and a sense of betterment for the entire community….”

Will There Be Libraries in 25 Years?  | Time

“But just as the Web increased people’s access to information exponentially, an opposite trend has evolved. Global media corporations—emboldened by the expansive copyright laws they helped craft and the emerging technology that reaches right into our reading devices—are exerting absolute control over digital information. These two conflicting forces—towards unfettered availability and completely walled access to information—have defined the last 25 years of the Internet. How we handle this ongoing clash will define our civic discourse in the next 25 years. If we fail to forge the right path, publishers’ business models could eliminate one of the great tools for democratizing society: our independent libraries.

These are not small mom-and-pop publishers: a handful of publishers dominate all books sales and distribution including trade books, ebooks, and text books. Right now, these corporate publishers are squeezing libraries in ways that may render it impossible for any library to own digital texts in five years, let alone 25. Soon, librarians will be reduced to customer service reps for a Netflix-like rental catalog of bestsellers. If that comes to pass, you might as well replace your library card with a credit card. That’s what these billion-dollar-publishers are pushing.

 

The libraries I grew up with would buy books, preserve them, and lend them for free to their patrons. If my library did not have a particular book, then it would borrow a copy from another library for me. In the shift from print to digital, many commercial publishers are declaring each of these activities illegal: they refuse libraries the right to buy ebooks, preserve ebooks, or lend ebooks. They demand that libraries license ebooks for a limited time or for limited uses at exorbitant prices, and some publishers refuse to license audiobooks or ebooks to libraries at all, making those digital works unavailable to hundreds of millions of library patrons….”

How We Open Knowledge: Scholastica users share their stories

“In the progression of the Open Access (OA) movement, it’s become resoundingly apparent that true accessibility isn’t just about making research free to read but also making publishing practices more equitable. If we are to realize the Budapest Open Access Initiative’s vision to “lay the foundation for uniting humanity in a common intellectual conversation and quest for knowledge,” all stakeholders must have an opportunity to contribute to OA models, not just those historically in positions of power.

The theme for this year’s OA Week (October 25-31), “It Matters How We Open Knowledge: Building Structural Equity,” invites the academic community to weigh the current state of OA and what’s needed to promote greater Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) throughout the research ecosystem. At Scholastica, we were particularly drawn to the phrase “how we open knowledge” as a means to elicit discourse and, more importantly, action around the various ways scholarly organizations of all sizes are and can develop more equitable OA journal models. We’re proud to work with so many scholarly societies, academic institutions, and scholar-led non-profits publishing path-breaking OA journals committed to not only opening access to research but also lowering the cost of knowledge production. In honor of OA Week, we decided to reach out to some of those journal teams to ask them to share their take on the prompt “how we open knowledge.”

Throughout OA Week, we’ll be posting a series of interviews with Scholastica users on how they’re factoring structural equity into OA publication planning and advice for scholarly organizations looking to launch fully-OA journals….”