AAA Publishing Looks Toward the (Murky) Future – Anthropology News

“As a committee, we have discussed various business models for open access, from transformative agreements like the one between Elsevier and the University of California system to the Subscribe to Open model now being implemented at Berghahn and Annual Reviews. We have begun to consider a more federated approach to AnthroSource that would bring together AAA content from multiple sources, inspired by the work of the Next Generation Library Publishing project. Over the past decade, different iterations of the PFC have also thought about the possibility of creating a larger mega-journal composed of Sections corresponding to some of the subfields represented in our current portfolio….

The second step of the process will be to engage a third-party scholarly communication consultant to assist in plotting out scenarios for a sustainable future for the AAA publishing program. Experience with a range of open access models and a demonstrated understanding of the challenges facing social science society publishers will be our primary considerations in selecting a consultant. A consultant who sees the advantages of partnering with different types of publishers will be given the highest consideration. The committee regards the results of the self-study as critical to the consultant’s work, and we will request that prospective consultants outline a process for reaching out to and collaborating with the Sections. It is the PFC’s hope that the consultant will be able to provide each publishing section with a clearer understanding of not only a future for their journal but also of the portfolio as it moves toward a more open future.”

Tampere University Automating its Open Access Management through ChronosHub – ChronosHub

“ChronosHub and Tampere University are proud to announce a collaboration to guide authors through the publishing process, making funder policies and open access (OA) agreements transparent and automating the management of article processing charges (APCs).  

As the first institution in Finland, Tampere University takes its OA management to the forefront by leveraging the ChronosHub platform. The platform supports an automated APC funding approval workflow by combining integrations with publishers, and AI-powered scanning of author-submitted acceptance letters and APC invoices. This provides Tampere with a single approval dashboard covering all articles across all publishers, with automated funding eligibility checks and full insights into its APC expenditure. …”

DORA at 10: Looking back at the history and forward to the future of research assessment | DORA

“DORA will be 10 years old in May 2023 and we are planning to mark the occasion! We’ll be holding a weeklong celebration for DORA’s 10th Anniversary and we’re inviting you to join in by organizing an event on research assessment for your local community. We want to have conversations about what DORA has done and what we still need to do all over the globe! DORA’s 10th Anniversary Celebration will be comprised of two parts:

DORA’s 10th Anniversary Celebration will be comprised of two parts:

Two plenary online sessions to discuss the state of the field, our past decade of work, and our future plans.
A global program of local or regional events that will allow communities to share insights and challenges in reforming, innovating, and researching responsible research assessment policies and practices….”

Coalition Publica Call for Projects 2023: Textual data in Social Sciences and Humanities (SSH) – Public Knowledge Project

“Coalition Publica announced the 2023 Call for projects – Textual data in SSH with the goal of promoting access to massive research resources. As a part of Coalition Publica, the Public Knowledge Project would like to extend the invitation to all non-commercial projects to submit research proposals and apply for access to the large collection of textual data that Érudit, together with Library and Archives Canada, Bibliothèque et Archives Nationales du Québec, Canadiana / CRKN and the Bibliothèque de l’Assemblée Nationale du Québec is developing.”

Scholarship for the Public Good: Paths to Open Access – Calendar – CUNY Graduate Center’s Mina Rees Library

“Open access scholarly literature—roughly, scholarly works that are online and free of charge for all—has developed over the past 20 years from wild idea to widespread reality. Open access journals, books, and repositories are now established parts of the scholarly ecosystem, and many consider near-universal open access to be inevitable. 

But publishing itself is not cost-free, so how can open access be achieved? There are many possible paths, some now common, some more experimental. Which of these paths align with our values as researchers, and with the mission of the Graduate Center and CUNY as a whole? Which empower the research community? Which should we pursue, and which should we eschew?

The first event in the “Scholarship for the Public Good” series (learn more below) will explore various paths to open access. The event will feature three experts:

Peter Suber (Harvard University) will describe the institutional open access policies passed by the faculties of Harvard and many other universities.
Heather Paxson (MIT) will discuss the transition of society journal Cultural Anthropology from subscription-based to open access, and its ongoing quest to fund publication without article processing charges (APCs). 
Leslie Chan (University of Toronto) will examine high-profit publishers’ problematic approaches to open access (high APCs, vertical integration, and more)….”

Finding The ‘Rights’ Balance:. 7 ideas to harmonize debates… | by Open Data Charter | opendatacharter | Jan, 2023 | Medium

“The importance of the right to access to information and the right to personal data protection, both of which are fundamental human rights, raises the need to strike a balance to be able to exercise both in a complementary manner, that ensures that one of them does not jeopardize the guarantees enshrined by the other. There are different proposals and techniques that allow us to continue working on open data for a more democratic and just society, respecting the right to privacy. We explore some ideas below….”

India’s Fumbled Chance For Sharing Knowledge – CodeBlue

“In terms of open access to knowledge, India could have been the Vishwa Guru — the world’s teacher.

As early as 2000, India was making moves to allow taxpayer-funded research to be freely available for anyone in the world to read, share and distribute. But India has squandered that advantage.

Fast forward to 2022, and much of India’s research is still locked up behind the paywalls of corporate academic publishers, while the global science community increasingly questions why taxpayer-funded research should not be available for everyone to read….”

Data sharing: what do we know and where can we go?

“OASPA is pleased to announce our next webinar which will focus on the what about and the why of data sharing.

The recent OSTP “Nelson memo” served as a re-focus on data as a first class research output. But maybe that’s a misrepresentation for those of us who think ‘hold on, we’ve been focused on data this whole time!?’ Well here’s a chance to learn from and with a group of experts who are thinking carefully about data sharing: what that means from different perspectives, tangible steps to take and policies to make around data, and what we can do next in our communities of practice. Attendees are more than welcome to bring their own perspectives! The webinar will be chaired by Rachael Lammey. We welcome our panelists: Sarah Lippincott will give a repository perspective with insights into where data is going post Nelson Memo and NIH Policy. Aravind Venkatesan will share the thinking, data science and workflows employed at EuropePMC to support data linking. Shelley Stall will talk about how AGU are leading the line with their data policies, and Kathleen Gregory will conclude by considering researchers’ perspectives regarding sharing and reusing data.”

Head, Research Support

“The support offered by university libraries for researchers has radically changed in the last 20 years. Whereas the previous focus was developing and contextualising a library collection, research support is now just as much about sharing the output of the university with the wider world, and providing the expertise to make that happen. University libraries are no longer just collectors, but also publishers

The role of Head of Research Support at TU Delft Library reflects this. The Head will manage a team of 8, managing their work, encouraging their development and ensuring excellent, engaged performance.

In terms of content, the team head has the four following areas of responsibility. In each of these areas, the head will be expected to create a strategic vision and, with the team, develop the policies and tactics needed to implement this vision.  

Directing the TU Delft Open publishing press, working closely with the Senior Publication Officer
Ensuring the provision of high-quality advice to the TU Delft research community on publication strategies and tactics, and helping drive forward the Open Access agenda locally, nationally and internationally
In collaboration with the Collections Manager, overseeing the development of the library collection of journals, ebooks, databases and other scholarly publications
Using in-depth research analytics to identify important patterns and trends in research and publication at TU Delft….”

RAISE Project: a Game Changer for OS

The real value of open data for the research community is not to access them, but to process them as conveniently as possible in order to reduce time-to-result and increase productivity. RAISE project will provide the infrastructure for a distributed crowdsourced data processing system, moving from open data to open access data for processing. 

Survey of US Higher Education Faculty 2023, Need for & Use of Information About Copyright

“This report looks closely at the extent and kind of information about copyright practices needed by faculty at US colleges and universities.  The report helps its readers to answer questions such as:  how much do faculty need information about copyright? How much have they used and benefited from information about copyright provided by academic libraries?  What policies in this area do faculty want libraries to follow?  How satisfied are they with current policies? What are the demographic characteristics of faculty who have consulted attorneys about copyright issues? Which faculty go to librarians and which rely on peers for copyright advice?  Which copyright issues most concern faculty? Are they more inclined to query about copyright issues related to open access? Or to issues related to making material available in their classes? The study presents specific data for faculty interest in a broad range of copyright issues, including but not limited to open access, copyright for data, issues with commercial article sharing platforms, negotiation of author contracts, use of audio-visual materials, copyright issues in citation and much more.

This study is based on data from a survey of 806 higher education faculty randomly chosen from nearly 500 colleges and universities in the USA. Data is broken out by personal variables such as work title, gender, personal income level, academic discipline, age and other variables, as well as institutional indicators such as college or university type or Carnegie class, enrollment size, public or private status and others. Readers can compare the copyright needs and practices of faculty in medicine to those in the social sciences, for example, or to business faculty. Also, copyright information consumption of associate professors can be compared to that  for full professors, or copyright consultation practices of men to that for women, etc. etc.

Just a few of this 118-page report’s many findings are that:

Broken out by work title, associate professors had the strongest need for information about copyright.
26.4% of full professors sampled had ever consulted a lawyer over a copyright issue.
Broken out by type of college, dissatisfaction with the services to advise or inform about copyright practices was highest at specialized colleges, such as seminaries, theater schools and other similar institutions.
34.12% of survey participants felt that they had a need for copyright advice about making their research available in repositories or other open access venues.”

Data Management Plans: Implications for Automated Analyses

Abstract:  Data management plans (DMPs) are an essential part of planning data-driven research projects and ensuring long-term access and use of research data and digital objects; however, as text-based documents, DMPs must be analyzed manually for conformance to funder requirements. This study presents a comparison of DMPs evaluations for 21 funded projects using 1) an automated means of analysis to identify elements that align with best practices in support of open research initiatives and 2) a manually-applied scorecard measuring these same elements. The automated analysis revealed that terms related to availability (90% of DMPs), metadata (86% of DMPs), and sharing (81% of DMPs) were reliably supplied. Manual analysis revealed 86% (n = 18) of funded DMPs were adequate, with strong discussions of data management personnel (average score: 2 out of 2), data sharing (average score 1.83 out of 2), and limitations to data sharing (average score: 1.65 out of 2). This study reveals that the automated approach to DMP assessment yields less granular yet similar results to manual assessments of the DMPs that are more efficiently produced. Additional observations and recommendations are also presented to make data management planning exercises and automated analysis even more useful going forward.