Barcamp Open Science 2022

Save the date! – Online 7th March 2022 #oscibar Barcamp Open Science is a friendly and open scpace for those interested in making open science happen and to connect with open science communities. In true Barcamp style the day long event is made up of session suggested by the wider community. If you want to test out an idea, share a project, or have a question you think the open science community…

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Building a Tool to Find Translated Scientific Articles

You know an article exists, but cannot read its language. So you go to our tool, paste the Digital Object Identifier of the article and get a list with translated versions. You manage your articles in a reference manager and notice that an article on your reading list is now also available in your mother tongue. You are really enthusiastic about a new article that was just published…

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Pluralism vs. Monoculture in Scholarly Communication, Part 2

Calls for a monoculture of scholarly communication keep multiplying. But wouldn’t a continued diversity of models be healthier?

The post Pluralism vs. Monoculture in Scholarly Communication, Part 2 appeared first on The Scholarly Kitchen.

Launch of Translate Science

A repost from Translate Science Blog by TeamTranslateScience as of 6 May 2021. Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. Translate Science is interested in the translation of the scholarly literature. Translate Science is an open volunteer group interested in improving the translation of the scientific literature. The group has come together to support work on tools…

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Life without a Journal Deal

What is it like to work at a library where the largest journal subscription deal was terminated? How do the researchers really feel about it? And what solutions are recommended? In this episode, we explore what Swedish librarians and researchers experienced during the time period when they didn’t have a journal deal with Elsevier (from …

The post Life without a Journal Deal appeared first on Open Science Talk.

History of publications: Mission or Money?

What is the historical relationship between publishing, money-making and scholarly mission? And what can we learn from our own history? We explore the past with our guest Aileen Fyfe. She is a historian of science, technology and publishing, and Professor of Modern History at the University of St Andrews. Finances We had the chance to …

The post History of publications: Mission or Money? appeared first on Open Science Talk.

Open Code and Peer Review

In this episode, we are talking about “open code” or “open source” and the benefits of making your code available in a peer review process and having it checked. Our guest is Dr. Stephen Eglen from the department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics at the University of Cambridge. Together with Dr. Daniel Nüst, from …

The post Open Code and Peer Review appeared first on Open Science Talk.

Maintaining high research integrity standards at PLOS ONE

Since 2006, PLOS ONE has published >200,000 articles, providing an inclusive home for primary research spanning all scientific disciplines and representing researchers from around the globe. As reflected in the journal’s publication criteria and policies,

Looking ahead: EIFL’s plans for open access

“Open scholarship is growing in importance as a way of ensuring that there is global participation in research, improved quality and efficiency of education and science, and faster economic and social progress.

Over the next two years, the EIFL Open Access Programme will support open scholarship by focusing on four key areas: open access policies, open science training for early career researchers, sustainable open access journals and repositories, and Open Educational Resources….”

Itzï

Itzï is a hydrologic and hydraulic model that simulates 2D surface flows on a regular grid using simplified shallow water equations. It uses GRASS GIS as a back-end for reading entry data and writing results. It simulates surface flows from direct rainfall or user-given point inflows, and uses raster time-series as entry data, allowing the use of radar rainfall or varying friction coefficients.

Itzï is developed by Laurent Courty at the engineering institute of the National Autonomous University of Mexico.

On the 12 Days of Science, PLOS ONE Gave to Me…

22728762473_caae76cf26_oIt’s starting to get colder in San Francisco, and the year-end holidays are soon to be upon us. This has made all of us on the PLOS ONE team excited to spend some time with

Open Science Codefest

Open Science CodefestThe National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) at UCSB is co-sponsoring the Open Science Codefest 2014, which aims to bring together researchers from ecology, biodiversity science, and other earth and environmental sciences with computer scientists, software engineers, and developers to collaborate on coding projects of mutual interest.

Do you have a coding project that could benefit from collaboration, or software skills you’d like to share? The codefest will be held from September 2-4 in Santa Barbara, CA.

Inspired by hack-a-thons and organized in the participant-driven, unconference style, the Open Science Codefest is for anyone with an interesting problem, solution, or idea that intersects environmental science and computer programming. This is the conference where you will actually get stuff done – whether that’s coding up a new R module, developing an ontology, working on a data repository, creating data visualizations, dreaming up an interactive eco-game, discussing an idea, or any other concrete collaborative goal that interests a group of people.

Looks like a great program!