Does Size Matter? Jellyfish Venom Capsule Length Association with Pain

Japanese Sea-Nettle

Since the PLOS San Francisco office is a quick car ride from the Monterey Bay Aquarium, so many of us at PLOS have been captivated by jellyfish movements. They are simply mesmerizing to watch as they travel through the water. … Continue reading »

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Printing the Past: Putting a Prehistoric Mystery Lizard Back Together Again

The size, shape, and solidity of an egg can tell us a lot, but until we can see inside, there is still an opportunity for surprise. Unfortunately, when you have an ancient fossilized lizard egg, you can’t just crack it … Continue reading »

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The Nose Knows: Oriental Honey Buzzards Use Nose and Eyes to Forage for Sweet Treats

Winnie the…Buzzard? The Oriental honey buzzard Pernis orientalis feeds primarily on honey and bee or wasp larvae. But how do they find their food? In the winter, thousands of Oriental honey buzzards migrate to Taiwan to forage. These migrating honey … Continue reading »

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PLOS ONE’s Top 5 Videos of 2015 (So Far)

At the end of 2014, we highlighted some of our favorite research videos from that year. We’re only mid-way through 2015, but we already have a number of popular research videos that we’d like to share. Here are some of … Continue reading »

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Flight of the Bats: Exploring Head Shape and Aerodynamics

It’s a bird…it’s a plane…it’s a bat! All three may be soaring through the sky, but their shapes vary greatly, which affects their aerodynamics during flight. Birds typically have streamlined head profiles that strongly contrast with the appendages featured on … Continue reading »

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Small Talk: When Bacterial Chatter Gets Invasive

Sticks and stones may break our bones but microbes’ “words” may hurt us. Breast cancer is a threat to men and women worldwide. Like all cancers, the known causes are attributed to genetics and carcinogens, but recently, scientists have begun … Continue reading »

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Who Let the Microbes Out: A Paw Print of Doggy Skin Bacteria

A house is not a home without a dog, and a dog isn’t a “D-O-double-G” without its microbial “crew.” Human microbiome research is progressing rapidly, and we are always learning how the bacteria living on and inside of us contribute … Continue reading »

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Honey for Your Boo Boo

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An apple a day might keep the doctor away, but honey may fight some infections. Bacterial cell walls are not only responsible for sustaining the cell’s shape but are also necessary for the bacteria’s growth, survival, and reproduction. A class … Continue reading »

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PLOS ONE’s Top 5 Videos of 2014

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Throughout the year we highlight research images that are worth a thousand words. For this year-end list, we’d like to extend the category to our research videos. Here, we’ve highlighted some of this year’s most popular videos, published in the Supporting … Continue reading »

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Our 200,000-Year-Old Ancestors: Neanderthal Bones in Northern France

Neanderthal bones

We often make new discoveries about our ancient ancestors and how they may have behaved, and we sometimes find the evidence right in their bones. For instance, researchers recently described how the jaw and teeth of a Neanderthal might suggest … Continue reading »

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