Guest Post — BioASQ for the Win: Inside the Healthiest Competition You’ve Never Heard Of

A look at BioASQ — an annual competition to develop AI systems to help drive medical progress.

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Article Sharing Framework: Facilitating Scholarly Sharing Through Metadata

The STM Association released an Article Sharing Framework to facilitate use of scholarly collaboration networks in compliance with new EU Copyright Directive.

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Guest Post – Starting a Novel Software Journal within the Existing Scholarly Publishing Ecosystem: Technical and Social Lessons

The Journal of Open Source Software was designed from scratch using the principles of open source and software design practices. This has both advantages and disadvantages, particularly with respect to elements of the traditional scholarly publishing ecosystem.

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Guest Post — Building the Last Mile: A Plan for Bringing the Expanding Universe of Digital Primary Sources into Classrooms

Getting digitized primary source materials into the classroom requires an open dialogue among researchers, teachers, and archivists. A workshop from historians of business shows how.

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Worth a Thousand Words: Rediscovering an “Extinct” Species

It’s not every day that you come across a living member of an extinct species. Nathan Whelan, a doctoral student at the University of Alabama, had such a day in 2011, when he found specimens of Leptoxis compacta on the banks of the Cahaba River. The last recorded collection of L. compacta more commonly known as the oblong rocksnail, dates back to 1933; the species was formally declared extinct in 2000. The first picture above is Figure 4 from the manuscript, published just last month.

Whelan et al. conducted several tests to confirm that this species above was indeed L. compacta. They compared the shells they found with shells of other known gastropods in the same area. The shells were dissimilar in both pigmentation and pattern. The researchers also compared their findings with archival L. compacta. By using a scanning electron microscope (SEM), they found strong evidence to suggest that they had rediscovered a heretofore “extinct” species.

Citation: Whelan NV, Johnson PD, Harris PM (2012) Rediscovery of Leptoxis compacta (Anthony, 1854) (Gastropoda: Cerithioidea: Pleuroceridae). PLoS ONE 7(8): e42499. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0042499