Osma me?unarodna konferencija o znanstvenoj komunikaciji u kontekstu otvorene znanosti PUBMET2021 – Profitiraj.hr

The Eighth International Conference on Scientific Communication in the Context of Open Science PUBMET2021 continues a series of very successful conferences on scientific communication organized by the University of Zadar, the Croatian Association for Scientific Communication – ZNAK, the University of Zagreb and the Ru?er Boškovi? Institute. The conference will be held from 15 to 17 September 2021 under the auspices of the Ministry of Science and Education, OpenAIRE, the European Association of Science Editors (EASE) and SPARC Europe.

COAR releases resource types vocabulary version 3.0 for repositories with new look and feel – COAR

“We are pleased to announce the release of version 3.0 of the resource types vocabulary. Since 2015, three COAR Controlled Vocabularies have been developed and are maintained by the Controlled Vocabulary Editorial Board: Resource types, access rights and version types.  These vocabularies have a new look and are now being managed using the iQvoc platform, hosted by the University of Vienna Library.

Using controlled vocabularies enables repositories to be consistent in describing their resources, helps with search and discovery of content, and allows machine readability for interoperability. The COAR vocabularies are available in several languages, supporting multilingualism across repositories. They also play a key role in making semantic artifacts and repositories compliant with the FAIR Principles, in particular when it comes to findability and interoperability….”

Institutional Repository Librarian Job Opening in Morgantown, West Virginia – ALA JobLIST | Jobs in Library & Information Science & Technology

“The Knowledge Access & Resource Management Department in Libraries at West Virginia University is seeking applications for an Institutional Repository Librarian. The Institutional Repository Librarian is responsible for managing the West Virginia University Institutional Repository and related technologies, with a focus on metadata to facilitate discovery, acquisition, and assessment of collections, and identity management to increase the impact of WVU’s intellectual output. Collaborating with institutional stakeholders to acquire and promote the University’s digital and open scholarship, this position provides customer service and outreach to West Virginia University faculty, staff, students, and research affiliates, evaluates and implements third party integrations such as Altmetrics, and serves as workflow manager for projects within and across Scholarly Communications and the KARM Department. The Institutional Repository Librarian reports to the Head of Metadata Services in KARM….”

In the Netherlands: The 100% open access ambition

[Undated] “The Dutch government is of the opinion that publicly funded research should be freely accessible. This was the position outlined by State Secretary Sander Dekker in a letter (in Dutch) to the Dutch House of Representatives already in November 2013. He was deliberately opting for the golden route. He aimed to have 60 percent of Dutch academic publication available through open access within five years (2019) and 100 percent within ten years (2024). If not enough progress is made, proposals will follow in 2016 to make open access publication mandatory.

In 2016, the Amsterdam Call for Action on Open Science was drawn up at an Open Science meeting organized by the Dutch Presidency of the Council of the European Union on 4 and 5 April 2016 in Amsterdam. The ambition of 100% open access was further strengthened and the date was also adjusted to 100% open access at the end of 2020. The results and actions are formulated in the Amsterdam Call for Action on Open Science. See the summary and comments on the Call for Action.

The government sets the priotity for the golden route because this is most sustainable in the long term. In addition, the publishers’ business model will change and this route provides the best guarantee that publications are immediately available. The green route often means lengthy embargo periods. …”

From principles to practices: Open Science at Europe’s universities: 2020-2021 EUA Open Science Survey results

“KEY RESULTS: • Open Science principles: over half (59%) of the surveyed institutions rated Open Science’s strategic importance as very high or high. Open Access to research publications was considered to be highly important for 90% of institutions, but only 60% considered its implementation level to be high. However, the gap between importance and implementation is much wider in data-related areas (RDM, FAIR and data sharing): high importance at between 55-70% of the institutions surveyed, with high levels of implementation at 15-25%. • Open Science policies: 54% of institutions have an Open Science policy and 37% are developing one. Only 9% of surveyed institutions lack an Open Science policy or are not planning to draft one. • Monitoring Open Access to research publications: 80% of institutions monitored the number of publications in their repository and 70% monitored articles published by their researchers in Open Access journals. In addition, almost 60% reported monitoring the cost of publications by their researchers in Open Access journals. • Infrastructure for Open Access to research publications: 90% of the institutions surveyed have their own repository, participate in a shared repository or both. For journal hosting or publishing platforms this figure reaches 66%, and levels out at 57% for monograph hosting/publishing. In addition, 66% of those surveyed reported that their institution has participated in or supported non-commercial Open Access publishing. Data-related skills: over 50% of the surveyed institutions reported that research data skills were only partially available. Moreover, all of the institutions that indicated the absence or partial availability of data skills, considered that more of these skills are needed at institutional level. • Emerging areas of Open Science: Approximately 50% of the respondents know of citizen science and open education activities at their institutions. • Open Science in academic assessment: In 34% of institutions, none of the Open Science elements examined by the survey were included in academic assessments. Amongst the institutions that included Open Science activities in their academic assessments, 77% took into consideration article deposition in a repository. …”

2021 Medical Institutional Repositories in Libraries (MIRL) Symposium – Proposal Submission Form

“The Medical Institutional Repositories in Libraries (MIRL) planning committee is now accepting proposals for the inaugural Medical Institutional Repositories in Libraries (MIRL) Symposium, which will take place virtually on Wednesday, November 17, 2021 (time to be determined).

The deadline for submitting proposals is September 3, 2021….”

Informationsplattform Open Access: Open-Access-Publizieren (Open Access Publishing)

From Google’s English: 

“Only when scientists * in

InIf you publish your research results, your findings become visible and can be recognized and cited accordingly. For a long time, publishing in print media, e.g. B. as a journal article, book or contribution in anthologies the most common way to record and disseminate scientific information permanently. The possibility of electronic publications and, above all, Open Access has given rise to a large number of alternative publication options . This significantly increases the citation frequency and thus the visibility of research results ( Swan, 2010; Li et al., 2018 ). The following shows which aspects have to be taken into account in open access publications.”

Kakai | An analysis of the factors affecting open access to research output in institutional repositories in selected universities in East Africa | Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication

Abstract:  INTRODUCTION Institutional repositories (IRs) present universities with an opportunity to provide global open access (OA) to their scholarship, however, this avenue was underutilised in two of the three universities in this study. This study aimed at proposing interventions to improve access to research output in IRs in universities in East Africa, and it adds to the depth of knowledge on IRs by pointing out the factors that limit OA in IRs, some of which include lack of government and funder support for OA and mediated content collection workflows that hardly involved seeking author permission to self-archive. METHODS A mixed methods approach, following a concurrent strategy was used to investigate the low level of OA in IRs. Data was collected from three purposively selected IRs in universities in East Africa, using self-administered questionnaires from 183 researchers and face-to-face interviews from six librarians. results The findings revealed that content was collected on a voluntary basis, with most of the research output deposited in the IR without the authors’ knowledge. The respondents in this study were, however, supportive of the activities of the IR, and would participate in providing research output in the IR as OA if required to do so. CONCLUSION The low level of OA in IRs in universities in East Africa could be increased by improving the IR workflow, collection development, and marketing processes. Self-archiving could be improved by increasing the researchers’ awareness and knowledge of OA and importance of IRs, while addressing their concerns about copyright infringement.

 

COVID-19 Research Repository now live – News – Public Health Scotland

“Public Health Scotland (PHS) has collaborated with Higher Education Institutions to create a comprehensive repository for COVID-19 Research in Scotland.

The repository, which contains research about COVID-19 in Scotland in a range of formats, is a fully accessible and searchable digital resource.

The creation of a fully searchable COVID-19 Research Repository reduces duplication of effort and makes research easier for policymakers, researchers and the public to find and use.

By providing easy access to recently published research on COVID-19 in Scotland on a single shared platform, PHS hopes to enhance the visibility of leading research and promote Scottish research to a national and international audience….”

Open Access Mandates in Universities: Challenges and Opportunities

“An Open Access mandate refers to a policy adopted by a funder, institution or the government which necessitates researchers to make their research articles public. This can be done via two routes: Green OA or Gold OA. The former refers to the researcher depositing her research article to an open access repository, generally institutional. The latter refers to submission of research to open access journals?—?some of which may levy Article Processing Charges (APCs) that can be paid by the researcher, his institution or from the research grant.

Universities that have adopted OA mandates include Harvard University (the first to do so), MIT, ETH Zurich, University of Liege and University College London. Harvard University has also developed a model policy language document for institutions looking to implement an open access policy for their faculty….”

Factors that influence data sharing through data sharing platforms: A qualitative study on the views and experiences of cohort holders and platform developers

Abstract:  Background

Infrastructures are being developed to enhance and facilitate the sharing of cohort data internationally. However, empirical studies show that many barriers impede sharing data broadly.

Purpose

Therefore, our aim is to describe the barriers and concerns for the sharing of cohort data, and the implications for data sharing platforms.

Methods

Seventeen participants involved in developing data sharing platforms or tied to cohorts that are to be submitted to platforms were recruited for semi-structured interviews to share views and experiences regarding data sharing.

Results

Credit and recognition, the potential misuse of data, loss of control, lack of resources, socio-cultural factors and ethical and legal barriers are elements that influence decisions on data sharing. Core values underlying these reasons are equality, reciprocity, trust, transparency, gratification and beneficence.

Conclusions

Data generators might use data sharing platforms primarily for collaborative modes of working and network building. Data generators might be unwilling to contribute and share for non-collaborative work, or if no financial resources are provided for sharing data.

Institutional Repository Librarian, Non-Tenure Track | J. Paul Leonard Library

“San Francisco State University’s J. Paul Leonard Library is a busy, teaching-oriented institution supporting a community of 25,000 students as well as faculty and staff. Our campus is part of the 23-campus California State University system, and we are seeking applications for an Institutional Repository Librarian who will work collaboratively with other librarians and staff across the system to operationalize the CSU-wide institutional repository, ScholarWorks. Additionally, the Institutional Repository Librarian will liaise with our campus community to promote ScholarWorks to students and faculty and provide related guidance on topics such as web accessibility and copyright….”

FAIR + Time: Preservation for a Designated Community

“Digital objects are inextricably dependent on their context, the infrastructure of people, processes, and technology that care for them. The FAIR Principles are at the heart of the data ecosystem, but they do not specify how digital objects are made FAIR or for how long they should be kept FAIR. This perspective is provided by the Trustworthy Digital Repository (TDR) requirements by defining long-term digital object preservation expectations. We’re all doing something for someone, and to deliver an effective service at scale, we need a sense of the types of users we have and how we can meet their needs, also in the future. 

FAIRsFAIR, SSHOC, and EOSC Nordic are all supporting digital repositories in their journey to achieve TDR status. When sharing experiences, the project teams found out that two fundamental TDR concepts are not always easy to understand: preservation and Designated Community. The draft working paper FAIR + Time: Preservation for a Designated Community was prepared in collaboration with the three projects. It seeks to present key concepts and expand on them to specify the standards and assessments required for an interoperable ecosystem of FAIR (findable, accessible, interoperable and reusable) data preserved for the long term in generalist and specialist FAIR-enabling trustworthy digital repositories (TDR) for a defined designated community of users. It seeks to provide context and define these concepts for audiences familiar with research data and technical data management systems but with less direct experience of digital preservation and trustworthy digital repositories. This is intended to help clarify which organisations are potential candidates to receive CoreTrustSeal TDR status and identify and support the types of organisations that may not be candidates but play a vital role in the data ecosystem. …”