HuMetricsHSS Initiative Receives $650,000 Mellon Grant – College of Arts & Letters

“Michigan State University has received a $650,000 grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to continue the work being done by the Humane Metrics for the Humanities and Social Sciences (HuMetricsHSS) initiative, an international partnership committed to establishing more humane indicators of excellence in academia with a particular focus on the humanities and social sciences.  

The goal of the HuMetricsHSS initiative is to empower people at all levels of academic institutions by identifying core values and aligning reward mechanisms in every area — from grades and funding to promotion and tenure — with those values. …”

OLH reopens applications to flip subscription journals to open access | Open Library of Humanities

We are delighted to announce that the Open Library of Humanities is now open to expressions of interest from subscription journals in the humanities seeking to move to a gold open access (OA) publishing model without author-facing charges (‘diamond’ OA).

The Open Library of Humanities (OLH) is a charitable organisation dedicated to publishing open access scholarship with no author-facing article processing charges (APCs). We are funded by an international consortium of libraries who have joined us in our mission to make scholarly publishing fairer, more accessible, and rigorously preserved for the digital future. Our mission is to support and extend open access to scholarship in the humanities – for free, for everyone, for ever.

Scoping future data services for the arts and humanities – UKRI

“Apply for funding to explore ways to archive arts and humanities research data….

Your proposal could focus on one of the following:

 

large or complex 3D objects
‘born-digital’ material and complex digital objects
practice research, including performance and visual arts….”

Graves in 19,000 English churchyards to be mapped online | Anglicanism | The Guardian

“Graves in 19,000 churchyards in England are to be digitally mapped in a seven-year project that will be a boon to people researching family history.

The Church of England is to launch a free website next year that will eventually list every grave memorial in every churchyard in the country.

 

The ancient church of St Bega on the shores of Bassenthwaite Lake in Cumbria is the first churchyard to be scanned by surveyors using sophisticated laser equipment….”

Interview with Editor-in-Chief: Professor Qinglong Peng – News – New Techno-Humanities – Journal – Elsevier

“Open access publishing has attracted huge momentum in recent years. Researchers in humanities now have more opportunities to publish as open access, not to mention for colleagues from science and medicine areas. Quite often authors will have to pay a big sum in order to publish open access and I know this may actually pose serious challenges to some of our authors as fundings in humanities studies are still not such common. I am very happy to see that Shanghai Jiao Tong University will fully sponsor the publication of this journal and thus authors do not need to pay for publication. I trust this sponsorship will provide more opportunities for researchers from those under-represented regions and disciplines. Meanwhile, open access will surely improve the visibility of our contributor’s works, expanding naturally their influence in the long run….”

Humanities Content on ScienceOpen – ScienceOpen Blog

“Although our name may suggest a focus on the physical and natural sciences, ScienceOpen works with all types of scholarly publishers. Many of our partners are publishing in the fields of humanities and social sciences (HSS), and so ScienceOpen is a great resource for research in these areas in addition to STEM subjects. In this post, we are pleased to highlight some very interesting and recently added HSS content and Collections on the platform….

In this post, we start out by presenting six Collections of Books that fall into the HSS subjects. Next, we have listed many of the humanities journals that are featured on the platform. We then list Collections created with our partner, Emerald Publishing, that bring together research on the Sustainable Development Goals that include a lot of HSS research. Lastly, we have listed a couple new Social Sciences (SS) Journal Collections on ScienceOpen. We hope you’re able to find something that inspires you in this extensive list of HSS research on ScienceOpen….”

 

 

NEH grant to support training for high-impact public digital humanities collaborations | The University of Kansas

“The Institute for Digital Research in the Humanities at the University of Kansas has been awarded $190,000 from the National Endowment for the Humanities to offer training in public digital humanities and academic-community collaborations. An intensive weeklong summer institute — to be offered in June 2022 at the Hall Center for the Humanities — will provide foundational knowledge, skills and resources to successfully advance 12 public humanities projects, increasing their longevity, visibility and impact. This will be followed by a year of further online training, support and discussion, with a final symposium and showcase in June 2023….”

CEU Press’ Opening the Future programme hits funding target for 2nd and 3rd books

We are pleased to announce that Opening the Future at Central European University Press has already accrued enough library support to fund two more open access monographs, taking the total funded so far to three. This is hot on the heels of our June announcement on funding our first OA book; the programme is gaining momentum and already making a difference.

Opening the Future at CEU Press is a cost-effective way for libraries to increase their digital collections on the history and culture of Central and Eastern Europe and the former communist countries. Subscribing libraries get unlimited multi-user access to curated packages of books, with perpetual access after three years. The Press uses membership funds to produce new frontlist titles in open access (OA) format. All OA titles will be available via Project MUSE OAPEN, and DOAB. Today’s announcement sees the following two new OA titles funded by those subscriptions and forthcoming in November 2021:

Constructing Identities over Time: “Bad Gypsies” and “Good Roma” in Russia and Hungary, Jekatyerina Dunajeva

Everyday Life under Communism and After: Consumption and Lifestyle in Hungary, 1945–2000, Tibor Valuch

Author Jekatyerina Dunajeva said: 

“It is an honour to have my book published in Open Access. I frequently receive emails from scholars around the world asking if I might share my work, often citing prohibitive prices charged for publications. As a researcher of social inequalities, I believe equal access to knowledge is a necessary first step towards an equitable and democratic system of scholarship. Constructing Identities over Time will be part of a newly-launched book series in Critical Romani Studies at CEU Press and I hope that one day more books in the series might also be published OA.”

Further titles will be announced soon and advance notice will be given to avoid any double-dipping. And we are recording our progress along with our plans for OA books in 2021-2022 on the website at https://ceup.openingthefuture.net/forthcoming/.

If you would like to know more about becoming a member of Opening the Future, you can read more about the programme and benefits on the website, or contact Frances Pinter, CEU Press Executive Chair, on pinterf@press.ceu.edu

UKRI Open Access protocols: August 2021 | Historical Transactions

“Is to publish the research article in a subscription journal and deposit EITHER the Author Accepted Manuscript OR the Version of Record (where the publisher permits) in an institutional or subject repository at the time of final publication. This loosely corresponds to Green Open Access, though whereas this has hitherto operated with an embargo period, the policy now requires immediate Open Access to the deposited article. It is worth noting that some publishers, particularly outside the UK, do not currently permit a zero embargo period: authors will need to request this, which publishers will consider on a case-by-case basis.

In addition, submissions under Route 2 must include the following text in the funding acknowledgement section of the manuscript and any cover letter / note accompanying the submission: ‘For the purpose of open access, the author has applied a CC BY public copyright licence to any Author Accepted Manuscript version arising’.

Importantly (and in response to input from humanities and social science stakeholders), an exemption is permitted to the CC BY licence. CC BY ND (no derivatives) may be used where this can be justified by the author….”

Legal Literacies for Text Data Mining: New OER | Authors Alliance

“Authors Alliance is pleased to share the news of the open release of a comprehensive open educational resource (OER) on legal issues related to text data mining.

The new OER covers material taught at the Building Legal Literacies for Text Data Mining institute (funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities and led by Rachael Samberg and Tim Vollmer of UC Berkeley Library), and covers copyright, technological protection measures, privacy, and ethical considerations. It also helps other digital humanities professionals and researchers run their own similar institutes by describing in detail how the programming was developed and delivered, and includes ideas for hosting shorter literacy teaching sessions. Authors Alliance’s Executive Director, Brianna Schofield, co-authored a chapter on copyright in the OER.

Until now, humanities researchers conducting text data mining in the U.S. have had to maneuver through a thicket of legal issues without much guidance or assistance. The new OER empowers digital humanities researchers and professionals (such as librarians, consultants, and other institutional staff) to confidently navigate United States law, policy, ethics, and risk within digital humanities text data mining projects so that they can more easily engage in this type of research and contribute to the advancement of knowledge….”

Bring your OA game | Commonplace

by Agata Morka and Rupert Gatti

The end of June 2021 marked the finishing line for the OPERAS-P project, a European Union funded giant, in which multiple institutions came together to carve a path forward for Open Science in Social Sciences and Humanities. As part of the Work Package focused on innovation we investigated innovative business models for Open Access (OA) books. Our goal was ambitious: we aimed to develop, collate, and share knowledge on alternative (non-BPC) approaches to funding and publishing OA books. To fulfill this general goal, we wanted to better understand the perspectives of two crucial stakeholders in the book publishing ecosystem: libraries and publishers. Over the past fifteen months we have been researching, writing, and most importantly listening to the academic librarians and publishers to decipher their needs, hopes, and challenges they encounter when working with OA books. Coming from a publishing background, we felt that we had a relatively good understanding of this stakeholders group, so we started with the one we knew the least about: that of academic libraries. We wanted to know more about how they think, work, and decide for or against innovative projects for OA books.

Open Access and the Humanities: A dialogue on future directions for Ireland, 25 August 2021 | National Open Research Forum

“As research systems transition to Open Access models of dissemination, there is a need to foster a dialogue on impacts and support for disciplinary research communities. Together, Ireland’s National Open Research Forum (NORF) and the Irish Humanities Alliance (IHA) will host a workshop for researchers in the Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences to discuss future directions for Ireland’s transition to Open Access….”