OPERAS Annual Report 2020 | Zenodo

OPERAS is the Research Infrastructure supporting open scholarly communication in the social sciences and humanities (SSH) in the European Research Area. Its mission is to coordinate and federate resources in Europe to efficiently address the scholarly communication needs of European researchers in the field of SSH.

The OPERAS Annual Report provides a detailed record of the OPERAS AISBL within 2020: News from the OPERAS Assemblies, activieties and projects within 2020.

OPERAS-P project holds Final Meeting at June 29

On June 29, the final meeting of the OPERAS-P project will gather communities to present and discuss the results of the closing project and reflect together on the way forward to make Open Science a reality in the Social Sciences and Humanities. 

The OPERAS-P project has supported the development of the OPERAS research infrastructure by advancing its development in view of achieving its scientific, technical and community maturity. 

The programme of the meeting will include the presentation of the vision, mission and organisation of the OPERAS infrastructure, the role of its national communities, its governance model, its Special Interest Groups, as well as innovation and perspectives for the future – basing on the results from OPERAS-P work – and the building of the infrastructure in a community-driven process. 

The detailed programme is available on the OPERAS blog.

Amsterdam University Press launches new journals platform aup-online.com | Amsterdam University Press

“With the acquisition of 14 journal titles in 2020, adding up to a portfolio of 33 specialised journals in the humanities and social sciences, AUP further professionalizes its academic program by launching a platform that takes digital publishing to the next level….

aup-online.com, developed through publishing platform Ingenta Edify, fully exploits the possibilities of digital search and discovery. In this way, users will quickly find the content they are looking for. Other benefits include integrated SEO optimization (coordinated with Google Scholar), third-party integrations with tools such as Crossref, XML-first publishing options, DOI hyperlinks, and a first-class experience accessing full screen supplementary materials….

Project MUSE introduces AI-based links, powered by UNSILO, for related content

“Project MUSE is partnering with UNSILO, a Cactus Communications (CACTUS) brand that develops artificial intelligence(AI)-powered solutions for publishers, to implement robust new AI-driven content recommendations throughout its massive collection of books and journals in the humanities and social sciences. UNSILO recently completed the initial indexing of the Project MUSE content collection and enhanced related content recommendations appear throughout the platform.

The UNSILO Recommender API automatically identifies links to relevant content from the MUSE content corpus for any selected document (book chapter or journal article). The indexing is updated every 24 hours as new content is added to MUSE. Links are delivered to the platform in real time, enriching the user experience and providing relevance-ranked discovery that augments the learning experience. Over 250 concepts are extracted from every document, and then matched by rank with related material. …”

Welcome to our new open-access publishing platform – The Sociological Review

The Sociological Review, the home for critical sociological thinking and research in the UK and internationally for the past 113 years, has today (8 June 2021) launched an ambitious open-access publishing platform aimed at a broad and diverse global readership.

Save the date: DARIAH Open Access Book Bursary Q&A session

In May 2021, DARIAH-EU launched an annual Open Access Monograph Bursary for the publication of one’s first monograph within the domain of Digital Humanities. This initiative aims to support early career researchers to openly disseminate their first monographs in book series relevant to their field, and thus pave pathways to open research culture for arts and humanities disciplines. The bursary will fund the Open Access publication of one monograph (or other long form of scholarship) per year. 

The call for the 2021 DARIAH Open Access Monograph Bursary is currently open. The deadline for applications is December 6, 2021.

Q&A session – Bring Your Questions

To support applicants and interested researchers, we will host a Q&A information session on the eligibility criteria for participation in the call on the 25th of June at 10:00-11:00 CEST. 

Renowned Digital Humanities Researchers Begin Computing Cultural Heritage in the Cloud | Library of Congress

“Three renowned researchers in digital humanities and computer science are joining forces with the Library of Congress on three inaugural Computing Cultural Heritage in the Cloud projects, exploring how biblical quotations, photographic styles and “fuzzy searches” reveal more about the collections in the world’s largest Library than first meets the eye.

Supported by a $1 million grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation awarded in 2019, the initiative combines cutting edge technology with the Library’s vast collections to support digital humanities research at scale. These three outside researchers will collaborate with subject matter experts and technology specialists at the Library of Congress to experiment in pursuit of answers that can only be achieved with collections and data at scale. These collaborations will enable research on questions previously difficult to address due to technical and data constraints. Expanding the skills and knowledge necessary for this work will enable the Library to support emerging methods in cloud-based computing research such as machine learning, computer vision, interactive data visualization, and other areas of digital humanities and computer science research. As a result, the Library and other cultural heritage institutions may build upon or adapt these approaches for their own use in improving access to text and image collections….”

How open access can support Humanities book authors: Interview with Zoe Hope Bulaitis | For Researchers | Springer Nature

“Dr Zoe Hope Bulaitis is author of the open access monograph Value and the Humanities: The Neoliberal University and Our Victorian Inheritance (Palgrave Macmillan, 2020). In this interview, she talks about how open access has supported her goals as a book author, and she provides tips for other authors on how to find open access funding and how to promote their own book….”

Covid-19 and Open Access in the Humanities: Impacts and Emerging Trends

Abstract:  Discussions of open-access publishing tend to center the scientific disciplines, and this trend has continued during the Covid-19 pandemic. But while the pandemic has certainly shed new light on the importance of openly accessible medical research, its effects—from economic impacts to attitudinal shifts—have been felt and speculated about across disciplines. This paper presents an investigation into present and future impacts of the pandemic on open-access publishing in the humanities, which have historically been slower to adopt open-access models than other disciplines. A survey distributed to scholarly publishing professionals, academic librarians, and others working in open-access humanities publishing sought to determine what changes these professionals had observed in their field since the start of the pandemic, as well as what impacts they projected for the long term. While the lasting effects of this still-evolving global health and economic crisis remain uncertain, the survey results indicate that open-access humanities professionals have already observed changes in areas including market demand, institutional interest, and funding, while many of them predict that the pandemic will have a long-term impact on the field. These findings contribute to an ongoing conversation about the place of the humanities in the openaccess publishing landscape and the need for sustainable institutional investment.

How open access can support Humanities book authors: Interview with Manuel Peréz García | For Researchers | Springer Nature

“Prof. Manuel Peréz García is a tenured Associate Professor at the Department of History, School of Humanities at Shanghai Jiao Tong University in China. He has published two open access books within the Palgrave Macmillan book series Palgrave Studies in Comparative Global History, for which he is editor-in-chief, called Global History and New Polycentric Approaches and Global History with Chinese Characteristics. In this interview, he talks about why open access is important not only for research in global history but also for society, authors and funders….”

Opening Up Scholarship in the Humanities: Digital Publishing, Knowledge Translation, and Public Engagement

Abstract:  Opening Up Scholarship in the Humanities: Digital Publishing, Knowledge Translation, and Public Engagement considers the concept of humanistic, open, social scholarship and argues for its value in the contemporary academy as both a set of socially oriented activities and an organizing framework for such activities. This endeavour spans the interrelated areas of knowledge creation, public engagement, and open access, and demonstrates the importance of considering this triad as critical for the pursuit of academic work moving forward—especially in the humanities. Under the umbrella of open social scholarship, I consider open access as a baseline for public engagement and argue for the vitalness of this sort of work. Moreover, I suggest that there is a strong connection between digital scholarship and social knowledge creation. I explore the knowledge translation lessons that other fields might have for the humanities and include a journalist–humanist case study to this end. I also argue for the value of producing research output in many different forms and formats. Finally, I propose that there are benefits to explicitly popularizing the humanities. In sum, this dissertation speculates on past, current, and future scholarly communication activities, and proposes that such activities might be opened up for wider engagement and, thus, social benefit.

Open access books in the humanities | For Researchers | Springer Nature

“Humanities book authors value the benefits that publishing open access can bring. Open access books are easy to find and share, allowing for authors to increase the real-world impact of their work.

Open access can support authors’ desires to increase interdisciplinary discussion and use of their work, and to reach a larger and broader audience outside of their normal networks to students, policymakers and the general public. Publishing an open access academic book can also help with career advancement. 

On this page you can find interviews with some of our featured book authors talking about their experiences of publishing open access, as well as open access book highlights from our Humanities list (History, Literature, Culture and Media Studies, Religion and Philosophy). Open access funding can sometimes be challenging to find, so you can also find a list of some of the funders who have supported our featured books, and information on our free Funding Support Service….”

Open Access in the Humanities: What, Why, and How | The Courtauld

“The Courtauld’s new Digital Art History Research Group (#DAHRG) is pleased to welcome Professor Martin Eve to give the first of two keynote seminars. In Open Access in the Humanities: What, Why, and How, Prof. Eve will provide a general background to open access. He will also highlight its challenges and economics. Finally, he will speak about The Open Library of Humanities (OLH), for which he is Project Director. OLH is a charitable organisation dedicated to publishing open access scholarship with no author-facing article processing charges (APCs)….”

New Visualization-Based Interface for the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy | Daily Nous

“Data engineer and developer Joseph DiCastro has created a visualization of the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (SEP) through which users can search for entries and see the connections between them. It generates attractive visualizations, but is also a well-designed, useful, and approachable tool for navigating the SEP.

 

“Visualizing SEP” provides clear visualizations based on a philosophical taxonomy that DiCastro adapted from the one developed by the Indiana University Philosophy Ontology Project (InPhO).

Type a term into the search box and suggested SEP entries will be listed. Click on one of the entry titles, and a simple visualization will appear with your selected entry at the center and related entries surrounding it. A brief summary of the SEP entry appears on one side of the screen, with a link to the full article, as well as a notation of the entry’s “primary domain,” (usually a philosophical subfield). On the other side is a list of the primary domains of the related entries. The domains and their corresponding entries are color-coded, too. If you’d like, you can flick a switch and the related entries appear as a list. You can also see the tallies of incoming, outgoing, and bidirectional links between the selected entry and others, and mouse over those indicators to highlight the corresponding linked entries….”

An Interactive Visualization of the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy | Open Culture

“The online Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, or the SEP, dispensed with the need for philosophy encyclopedias in print years ago. It’s “the most interesting website on the internet,” wrote Nikhail Sonnad at Quartz in 2015. “Not because of the content — which includes fascinating entries on everything from ambiguity to zombies—but because of the site itself. Its creators have solved one of the internet’s fundamental problems: How to provide authoritative, rigorously accurate knowledge, at no cost to readers. It’s something the encyclopedia, or SEP, has managed to do for two decades.” …

Visualizing SEP “provides clear visualizations based on a philosophical taxonomy that DiCastro adapted from the one developed by the Indiana University Philosophy Ontology Project (InPhO),” Justin Weinberg writes at Daily Nous. “Type a term into the search box and suggested SEP entries will be listed. Click on one of the entry titles, and a simple visualization will appear with your selected entry at the center and related entries surrounding it.” At the top of the page, you can select from a series of “domains.” Each selection produces a similar visualization of various-sized dots….”