Chefs de Cuisine: Perspectives from Publishing’s Top Table – Steven Inchcoombe – The Scholarly Kitchen

“As a leader in academic publishing, what most excites you right now?

I do think that making virtually all aspects of science open – its outcomes (i.e., articles and books), its data, its code, its techniques, etc. – has huge potential to improve trust in science and to accelerate its impact. Targeting this at finding solutions to UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) has to be the most important and exciting opportunity we all face. This will require imagination and an ability to better combine people and technology than ever before….

What do you anticipate the major challenges will be for Springer Nature, and indeed the publishing industry, over the next five years?

I think the greatest challenge is for us to find a way to make the transition to Open Science, including open access (OA), sustainable and equitable for all. Beyond this core challenge, we need to make sure that the determined and adaptable criminals and state actors that want to use our networks, our products, and our content to make illicit gains or gain access to the personal and institutional data of our customers are not able to succeed. These damage our customers and our reputations, and we must work together to prevent this.

 What does open access / public access mean for your business?

We strongly believe in the benefits to the whole research process of immediate OA to the article version of record (VoR) which means Gold OA. Other forms, such as Public Access (PA), offer benefits mainly outside of the research system, but so far we haven’t found a way of making them financially sustainable. Of course, OA is a precursor to Open Science, which I think is the greatest prize, but OA by itself still enables many benefits such as getting more research out to more researchers faster, into the hands of policy makers and businesses, and the wider public….”

CRKN Announces Transformative Agreement with Wiley | Canadian Research Knowledge Network

CRKN has signed a two-year, read-and-publish transformative agreement with Wiley. This cost-neutral agreement removes article processing charges (APCs) for authors publishing in Wiley hybrid journals at participating CRKN institutions, and is expected to result in the publication of over 4,000 articles as open access over the period of the agreement. Any corresponding authors affiliated with participating CRKN institutions, with articles accepted for publication in Wiley journals during the term of the agreement, will have their APC waived.

Open access deal ‘weakens publishers’ position’ | Times Higher Education (THE)

“Several leading UK universities will ask their academics to deposit their accepted manuscripts in free-to-read domains as part of a new pledge to support open access publication.

Under a new commitment agreed by members of the N8 Research Partnership, whose institutions include the universities of Leeds, Manchester and Sheffield, researchers will be urged to retain their intellectual property (IP) rights, rather than sign them over to publishers.

By doing so, scholars would be free to post final versions of research articles on institutional repositories, after obtaining a CC BY licence – a move that some publishers will not permit, or only allow after an embargo period, a route to publication known as green open access.

That has led to a stand-off between academics and publishers – with some journals refusing to publish manuscripts where an application for a CC BY licence has been made, whereby the researcher states they own the research….”

Gender inequality and self-publication are common among academic editors

Scientific editors shape the content of academic journals and set standards for their fields. Yet, the degree to which the gender makeup of editors reflects that of scientists, and the rate at which editors publish in their own journals, are not entirely understood. Here, we use algorithmic tools to infer the gender of 81,000 editors serving more than 1,000 journals and 15 disciplines over five decades. Only 26% of authors in our dataset are women, and we find even fewer women among editors (14%) and editors-in-chief (8%). Career length explains the gender gap among editors, but not editors-in-chief. Moreover, by analysing the publication records of 20,000 editors, we find that 12% publish at least one-fifth, and 6% publish at least one-third, of their papers in the journal they edit. Editors-in-chief tend to self-publish at a higher rate. Finally, compared with women, men have a higher increase in the rate at which they publish in a journal soon after becoming its editor.

Largest-ever study of journal editors highlights ‘self-publication’ and gender gap

The gender gap among senior journal editors is bigger than many people thought, and some editors publish a surprising number of their own papers in the journals that they edit, finds the first study to look at these issues over time across multiple disciplines.

Transformative Agreements in Australian Academic Libraries

Open access means making research available online, free of cost for anyone to access it. Open access is part of a wider ‘open’ movement to encourage free exchange of knowledge and resources to broaden access and encourage innovation, creativity and economic activity.  Publishing in academic peer-reviewed journals is a critical part of the academic process that maintains research integrity.[1] However, most academic journal articles are behind a paywall which means only those with subscription can access these publications. This blog post will discuss transformative agreements (TA) negotiated by the Council of Australian University Librarians (CAUL) which aims to provide authors the opportunity to publish open access immediately on acceptance, and free of any transactional Article Processing Charges (APCs).

Global Professional Publishing 2022-2026 : Market Research Report

“Key Findings

Among the key findings highlighted in the report are:

The largest segment withing professional publishing is Tax, Accounting and Business, which generated revenue of $40.8 billion in 2021, gaining 7.1% year over year.
RELX continues its reign at the top of the professional publishing industry, delivering revenue of $8.9 billion in 2021 with a market share of 11.9%
Strategic M&A activity, a tight market focus, and application of advanced technology has powered the tax, accounting, and business segment as the growth engine for professional publishing.
Content-drive technology, incorporating AI, machine learning and other advanced technologies is creating new opportunities for publishers to drive growth and improve profitability….”

JSTOR and university press partners announce Path to Open Books pilot

JSTOR, part of the non-profit ITHAKA, and a cohort of leading university presses announced today Path to Open, a program to support the open access publication of new groundbreaking scholarly books that will bring diverse perspectives and research to millions of people.

 

Elsevier and CONsortium on Core Electronic Resources in Taiwan establish agreement supporting open access publishing for Taiwanese researchers

Elsevier, a global leader in research publishing and information analytics, and the CONsortium on Core Electronic Resources in Taiwan (CONCERT) – the negotiating body representing universities in Taiwan – have successfully reached an agreement which supports open access (OA) publishing for Taiwanese authors and continued reading access to Elsevier’s world-leading content on ScienceDirect.

Wiley’s First Open Access Agreement in Hong Kong Promotes Research Accessibility

Wiley, one of the world’s largest publishers and a global leader in research and education, today announced a new open access agreement with Joint University Librarians Advisory Committee (JULAC) in Hong Kong, starting January 1, 2023.  

Tired of the profiteering in academic publishing? Vote with your feet. – Spatial Ecology and Evolution Lab

“First, let’s say one of the Olympian Editors asks you to review a manuscript for one of the profit-making esteem engines. You record on your CV that you have been asked to review for this journal (esteem points!), but you politely decline the invitation, explaining that you would rather your professional service go towards open science initiatives.

The editor at the esteem factory finds that her job has just become a lot harder than it used to be. It is hard to find reviewers, and the reviews aren’t as thorough or as good anymore. She keeps the line on her CV stating that she has been an editor at X (esteem points!), and then steps down at the next opportunity. She has better things to do than spend her days cajoling reluctant reviewers. And so it goes.

Being a discerning reviewer has nothing but benefits. There are no esteem points lost for the individual, and there is a higher turnover of editorial staff at high-esteem journals. This turnover means more opportunity and less competition for these positions, and it means the esteem hierarchy is flattened somewhat because, well, who hasn’t been an editor for Nature, and, besides, the stuff published there isn’t as good as it used to be. Overburdened reviewers have an important reason to do less reviewing; they are, through individual decision, changing the face of academic publishing and making science accessible to all….”

Author support and a high-quality publishing experience – The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery

“In response to this shifting landscape [toward OA], we aim to position the AATS [American Association of Thoracic Surgery] journals to take advantage of opportunities presented by open access publication. We are working to develop a portfolio strategy that uses the strengths of the journal program as a whole and increases the amount of high-quality surgical information published across the AATS journals. We strive to offer a robust publishing program with editorial policies that support our authors and ensure a high-quality author experience.”

Scholastica announces its second report on the ‘State of Journal Production and Access’ among independent academic publishers | STM Publishing News

“Scholastica, a leading software solutions provider for academic journals, announced today the release of “The State of Journal Production and Access 2022” report. The report encompasses the results of Scholastica’s second global survey of individuals working with scholarly society, university, and research institution publishers that independently manage and produce academic journals about how they currently approach production and content access and what they plan to prioritize in the future.

The 2022 survey, which yielded 82 responses, spanned core production and access areas, including article production processes and formats, metadata tagging standards and priorities, and Open Access (OA) journal development approaches and funding models.

Key survey findings include:

When asked to rate their publishers’ primary production goals, most respondents chose “journal/article search engine optimization”
95% of respondents said at least one of their publisher’s journals offered OA options
80% of respondents said their organization utilizes fully-OA publishing models
When asked to rate their publishers’ primary funding/revenue priorities, most respondents chose “identifying viable funding model(s) for publishing one or more fully-OA journals”…”

CHECKLIST FOR OPEN ACCESS PUBLISHERS ON IMPLEMENTING THE UNESCO RECOMMENDATION ON OPEN SCIENCE

“This document is part of the UNESCO Open Science Toolkit, designed to support implementation of the UNESCO Recommendation on Open Science. It has been produced in partnership with the Open  Access  Scholarly  Publishing  Association  (OASPA),  a  diverse  community  of  organizations  engaged  in  open  scholarship.  The  aim  is  to  provide  practical  assistance  to  the  open  access  publishing  community  to  better  understand  the  Recommendation  by  highlighting  the  areas  that apply to open access publishers who wish to support its implementation….”