DOAB officially launches its new service to further build trust in peer review and open access academic book publishing | Directory of Open Access Books

The Hague, 16 November 2022. The Directory of Open Access Books (DOAB), a community-driven discovery service for open access books, is launching its Peer Review Information Service for Monographs (PRISM). PRISM is a service provided by DOAB as part of the OPERAS service portfolio.

PRISM is a standardised way for academic publishers to display information about their peer review processes across their entire catalogue. On the DOAB site, you can see a PRISM logo next to a publisher and next to the individual book. PRISM peer review information is also included at the metadata level, making it available through the DOAB API which is freely distributed and incorporated into library search tools worldwide. Learn more about PRISM, including how to participate as a publisher here.

“DOAB and its community have been discussing and developing PRISM for a few years, and following a successful beta-testing phase, we are pleased to now launch the service, inviting publishers and stakeholders to engage with it” said Niels Stern, co-director of DOAB.

DOAB (including PRISM) is overseen by a Scientific Committee, which validates and reviews requirements, and acts as a Board of Appeal for complaints from publishers.

 

Providing transparency and building trust: the Peer Review Information Service for Monographs (PRISM) | OAPEN – supporting the transition to open access for academic books

In the summer of 2021, DOAB started a new service in beta phase: PRISM (Peer Review Information Service for Monographs). PRISM’s goal is to provide transparency about the peer review process that applies to the books in DOAB. Services such as PRISM can support research integrity and help build trust in open access academic book publishing.

 

”Scholarly monographs should also be Open Access, shouldn’t they?” – Guidelines and tools to making books Open Access. Oct 28, 3pm (CEST) | Danish Network for Open Access

When we talk about Open Access (OA), we mostly do so in the context of scholarly articles in journals. The Danish National Strategy for Open Access also has a special focus on OA for journal articles. Right now, however, a number of initiatives are pushing not only to publish scholarly monographs as OA but also to make it easier for researchers to ensure that publishers are transparent and thorough in their peer-review of OA publications.

In this session, Niels Stern will present relevant initiatives including DOAB (Directory of Open Access Books) and PRISM (Peer Review Information Service for Monographs) – both services that help researchers navigate the jungle of publishers of OA monographs. He will also provide some insights into what to keep in mind when looking for and selecting a publisher for a manuscript.

Niels Stern is director of OAPEN. He began his career in scholarly book publishing in 2003 with an emphasis on marketing and digital publishing. In this capacity he became a co-founder of the OAPEN project in 2008. Moving on to the Nordic Council of Ministers in 2011 as head of publishing he created a Nordic open access policy and publication repository. Since 2014 Niels Stern has acted as independent expert for the European Commission on open science and e-infrastructures. He has evaluated and reviewed numerous European projects, e.g. HIRMEOS and OPERAS-D.

 

Building stronger infrastructures to support open access books: LYRASIS, DOAB and OAPEN | Directory of Open Access Books

In 2021, DOAB and OAPEN entered into a new partnership with LYRASIS to develop its services for U.S. partners. As the Directory of Open Access Books (DOAB) continues to grow, now including well over 50,000 open access books, Sharla Lair, Senior Strategist of Open Access and Scholarly Communication at LYRASIS, and Tom Mosterd, Community Manager DOAB-OAPEN recently discussed what libraries, publishers and other U.S. partners may expect from both open infrastructure services for open access books in the near future.

 

Open Access Books: An Interview with OAPEN Foundation Director and DOAB Foundation Co-Director Niels Stern | LJ infoDOCKET

SciELO Books is celebrating ten years of operation focused on the development of infrastructure and the capabilities of scholarly book publishing in a digital format following the state of the art.

As part of the event celebrating the ten-year anniversary, intended as a forum to recognize the advances and challenges, and, mainly, to debate on the future of digital books in the light of open access and open science, we’ve interviewed speakers and officials from institutions directly linked to the development of SciELO.

We continue the series of interviews with Niels Stern, director of the OAPEN Foundation and co-director of the DOAB Foundation.

Building stronger infrastructures to support open access books: LYRASIS, DOAB and OAPEN

In 2021, DOAB and OAPEN entered into a new partnership with LYRASIS to develop its services for U.S. partners. As the Directory of Open Access Books (DOAB) continues to grow, now including well over 50,000 open access books, Sharla Lair, Senior Strategist of Open Access and Scholarly Communication at LYRASIS, and Tom Mosterd, Community Manager DOAB-OAPEN recently discussed what libraries, publishers and other U.S. partners may expect from both open infrastructure services for open access books in the near future.

Welcoming DOAB as an OASPA member – OASPA

We recently welcomed DOAB (Directory of Open Access Books) as an OASPA member in the Supporting Services and Infrastructure (Non-Commercial) category. DOAB joins 190 OASPA members and more than 30 others in the  supporting services and infrastructure category that provide significant services and/or support to open access publishing.  

We asked Tom Mosterd, Community Manager, a few questions so we could learn more about the organisation and its connection to open scholarship and decision to become an OASPA member. 

Welcoming DOAB as an OASPA member | OASPA

We recently welcomed DOAB (Directory of Open Access Books) as an OASPA member in the Supporting Services and Infrastructure (Non-Commercial) category. DOAB joins 190 OASPA members and more than 30 others in the  supporting services and infrastructure category that provide significant services and/or support to open access publishing.  

We asked Tom Mosterd, Community Manager, a few questions so we could learn more about the organisation and its connection to open scholarship and decision to become an OASPA member.

DOAB, OAPEN and open access books in Germany: a country report | Directory of Open Access Books

DOAB, OAPEN and open access books in Germany: a country report

In 2021, for the Directory of Open Access Books (DOAB) and the OAPEN Library we have seen growing interest and uptake amongst the German scholarly community. In no small part, thanks to growing support of the German library community and the addition of new German titles and publishers, a report of which we include below.

Guest post: Overcoming the challenges of open access books – part 1/2

“In part one of this two-part series, we’ll explore some of the challenges around policies and funding for OA books that were highlighted by authors and editors who were kind enough to participate in interviews about their experiences with OA publishing.

Each of the authors and editors I interviewed named wider dissemination and a more equitable research ecosystem as the main benefits of OA publishing. But they also highlighted a number of challenges which we will delve into below….”

DOAB achieves a major milestone | Open Electronic Publishing blog by OpenEdition

The Directory of Open Access Books (DOAB), led by OpenEdition and OAPEN Foundation (Open Access Publishing in European Networks), has achieved a key milestone. After the Global Sustainability Coalition for Open Science Services (SCOSS) named DOAB an international open science institution eligible for community funding, DOAB and OAPEN achieved their funding goal of €505,000 in three years, thanks to financing from 89 institutions in 14 countries. We are grateful to our partner institutions, who have been instrumental in supporting DOAB!

Open Access Books – Part II – Delta Think

“If a publisher decides to implement an OA books program, what does it do with older titles? Does it make its backlist retrospectively OA? Or reserve OA for frontlist titles only? (Or both?)….

The chart above analyzes the lead times in indexing books. It shows how many years after publication books were added to the index (the DOAB) and deemed to be made OA.

If titles are made OA in their year of publication (deemed to be frontlist titles), the lead time will be zero. Just over 25% of DOAB titles are frontlist.
If titles were made OA after their year of publication (deemed to be backlist titles), then the lead time will be a positive number. Around 16% of titles were made OA the year after publication. The remaining 69% or so of titles are deep backlist.
Although not shown above, the oldest titles in the DOAB date back decades. Earlier years (before 2000) typically have a handful of titles per publication year, with annual numbers increasing significantly in more recent years. The oldest title in the index was published in 1787….

Patterns in license usage are different if analyzed by publication year (left) compared with the year they were made OA or added to the index (right). We can clearly see license use by publication year shows distinct patterns, but license use by indexed year appears more random….

 

We see that the proportion of CC BY licenses (colors at the bottom of each bar) is significantly lower in books (32%) than in journals (51%). Likewise, CC BY-NC (2nd from bottom) – books (4%) vs. journal articles (15%). But CC BY-NC-ND licenses show the opposite: books have a greater proportion (29%) than journals (18%)….”

DOAB/OAPEN reaches important funding milestone | SCOSS – The Global Sustainability Coalition for Open Science Services

 

The Directory of Open Access Books (DOAB) and OAPEN, jointly part of SCOSS’s second funding cycle, has met a significant milestone by reaching its three-year funding goal of 505,000 Euros in about 18 months, despite the COVID-19 challenge. SCOSS and DOAB/OAPEN would like to express their gratitude towards its global funding community of 89 institutions from 14 countries that have contributed to this campaign. Ahead lies now the challenge for DOAB/OAPEN to sustain this crucial financial support from the community.