Open science and research | Uniarts Helsinki

“The Uniarts Helsinki Open Access policy describes the general principles of publishing. The policy applies to researchers, staff and students working at the University of the Arts Helsinki. Publications of the University of the Arts Helsinki are typically both artistic and scientific in nature.

We follow the guidelines on responsible conduct of research determined by the Finnish National Board on Research Integrity (TENK) in the publishing and openness of our research results.
Uniarts Helsinki requires open access publishing when possible.
Uniarts supports publishing in Gold open access publication channels through a centralized APC fund, subject to specified criteria.
Uniarts recommends the use of Creative Commons licences in publishing text-based research outputs. If the research funder is the Academy of Finland or the European Commission, CC BY 4.0 should be used. When publishing with open licenses, the author(s) retains the copyright.
Uniarts recommends that researchers register their ORCID iD and add it to their publication data.
Uniarts requires that researchers self-archive their scientific and peer-reviewed research publications when allowed by the publisher. Uniarts recommends researchers to upload the Final Draft (Author Accepted Manuscript, AAM) or the Publisher’s PDF to Uniarts Helsinki’s institutional repository. Artistic research publications or their parts are linked to the metadata in the repository.
The author is responsible for evaluating the quality and responsibility of the publication channel they have chosen to publish in.
The theses of master’s, licentiate’s and doctoral (both scientific and artistic) degrees are published, as appropriate, in Uniarts Helsinki’s open institutional repository Taju and also for example in Research Catalogue.
Training, support and guidance is provided for open access publishing.
The progress of open access publishing is monitored at Uniarts through the strategic goals of research….”

Seeking Stories: Open Access Dissertations, Theses and Reports | College of Computing Advising

“The Graduate School and J. Robert Van Pelt and John and Ruanne Opie Library are celebrating Open Access Week 2022 by highlighting 10 years of Michigan Tech graduate student scholars sharing their work on Digital Commons @ Michigan Tech. Digital Commons is the University’s institutional repository. We want to include you in the celebration!

Publishing open access helps scholars access your work and share the results of your research globally. We can see how this process happens through the usage statistics available from the Digital Commons platform and the PlumX dashboard embedded in individual submissions. We can’t wait to share our findings!

We also want to hear from you. Do you have an open access story to share about your student’s work or an interesting connection you have made? We’re gathering photos and stories to share with the campus. Please share your photos (JPG and PNG) and stories by Friday (Sept. 9) with gradschool@mtu.edu to be included in our celebration of graduate student scholars at Michigan Tech….”

Copyright: for learning, teaching, and research ( A guide) | Library & Cultural Services at University of Essex

Copyright is relevant whenever you are copying or sharing creative work. This includes publishing academic works, creating educational resources, uploading a thesis to the Repository, sharing images online, and more. This guide helps you to understand copyright and its relevance to your work and study at the University of Essex.

ETD 2022 – 25th International Symposium on Electronic Theses and Dissertations – ETD 2022, Novi Sad, Serbia

“The Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations (NDLTD), an international organization dedicated to promoting the adoption, creation, use, dissemination, and preservation of electronic theses and dissertations (ETDs), invites you to attend the 25th International Symposium of Theses and Dissertations, ETD 2022.

ETD 2022 held in Novi Sad, Serbia, from 07 to 09 September, is hosted by University of Novi Sad (http://www.uns.ac.rs/), and co-organized by non-profit organizations Science 2.0 Alliance (http://sci2zero.org/) and NTLTD (http://www.ndltd.org/). It will be an excellent opportunity to exchange ETD experiences with professionals from different countries, to discuss innovative projects and initiatives and to share successful experiences and up-to-date practices, and to network with colleagues and friends from all over the world. Safety of the participants is the top priority for the organizers and we keep one eye on the COVID pandemic and war in Ukraine. 

The conference theme is “FAIRness of ETDs and its implications”. We hope the conference will raise a fruitful discussion on importance of application of FAIR principles at ETDs and supplement materials. We aim to address topics such as:

FAIRness of ETDs and supplement materials;
ETD and OpenScience;
ETDs and research data;
ETDs and source code; …”

Thousands of older dissertations from UCSF newly available in eScholarship – California Digital Library

“Over three thousand dissertations and theses digitized from UCSF’s archives, originally submitted to the university between 1965 and 2006, were added to eScholarship this year. These titles cover topics as disparate as the pregnancy experiences of black women, AIDS and identity in the gay press of the 1980s, and models for examining the clearance of drugs from the liver. Before the project was undertaken to add these dissertations and theses to eScholarship, accessing them was challenging: you may have been able to find one in a database if you were at a subscribing institution, but if the title was old enough, your only option might have been to travel to California and visit a library storage facility. 

This is the case with dissertation literature around the world, especially older dissertations. Unique work produced by graduate students at thousands of academic institutions, representing their intellectual labor and that of their advisors and committees, sits behind paywalls or worse. As a result, researchers are often thwarted in trying to track down a citation to what sounds like the perfect source for their own studies….

Newer dissertations and theses — going back to 2007 — had been submitted electronically and were already available in eScholarship. Making older works available, however, proved complex. Even though the volumes had already been scanned as part of UC’s work with the Google Books project and the HathiTrust Digital Library, many questions remained. What permissions did students grant the university when they filed their dissertation paperwork? How could the image files generated by the scanning process be converted to document files for eScholarship? Where would the record data come from, so that each document’s title and author displayed properly? Answering these questions and several more required the expertise of numerous people at UCSF and the California Digital Library….”

Full article: Born Accessible: Creating Templates for Standardized, Accessible ETDs

Abstract:  At the University of Southern Indiana (USI), graduate programs primarily produce physical theses and capstones. As programs expand online options, the need for electronic dissertations and theses grows. The institutional repository offered a chance for the library to collaborate with graduate studies and teaching program faculty to develop templates that would streamline workflows and improve document accessibility. Templates were created for doctor of education dissertations in APA style, along with master theses in APA, MLA, and Chicago styles that could serve multiple programs. This presentation outlined the process of working with campus stakeholders to develop the templates, as well as the steps taken to ensure accessibility of both the template and final dissertation or thesis. Presentation resources and electronic theses and dissertation (ETD) templates are available for download at http://bit.ly/born_accessible.

 

Born Accessible: Creating Templates for Standardized, Accessible ETDs: The Serials Librarian: Vol 0, No 0

Abstract:  At the University of Southern Indiana (USI), graduate programs primarily produce physical theses and capstones. As programs expand online options, the need for electronic dissertations and theses grows. The institutional repository offered a chance for the library to collaborate with graduate studies and teaching program faculty to develop templates that would streamline workflows and improve document accessibility. Templates were created for doctor of education dissertations in APA style, along with master theses in APA, MLA, and Chicago styles that could serve multiple programs. This presentation outlined the process of working with campus stakeholders to develop the templates, as well as the steps taken to ensure accessibility of both the template and final dissertation or thesis. Presentation resources and electronic theses and dissertation (ETD) templates are available for download at http://bit.ly/born_accessible.

 

Dissertating in Public | hc:45003 | Humanities CORE

Abstract:  Kathleen Fitzpatrick analyses the sudden isolation graduate students find themselves in during the dissertation process. In the humanities, she observes, graduate students are regularly habituated into an anxiety of intellectual independence whereby sharing ideas, collaboration and publishing work in progress is to be considered suspect and potentially diminishing scholarly value. Digital scholarship, she argues, can eliminate or at least sideline such anxieties (and their untimeliness) by creating a participating public, testing ideas, interesting possible publishers early and creating a community of scholarship that, together with the support of PhD-granting institutions, endorses ‘new kinds of open work’.

UC Davis Contacts Alumni Authors in Successful Project to Open Theses and Dissertations for Worldwide Access – California Digital Library

“From January to September 2021, Sara Gunasekara of the UC Davis Archives and Special Collections Department, headed by Kevin Miller, undertook a project to expand access to UC Davis theses and dissertations digitized by Google and deposited in HathiTrust. Per copyright law, access to these volumes was restricted, based on their date of “publication.” Sara’s strategy for overcoming this barrier was to contact these alumni authors, asking them to submit a Rights Holder Creative Commons Declaration Form to HathiTrust, in order to have a Creative Commons License applied to their works. As a result, 1,047 UC Davis theses and dissertations were opened for worldwide access, to date, in HathiTrust. 

In all, nearly 24,000 UC Davis theses and dissertations (published from 1923 – 2010, with the physical volumes stored at UC’s Northern Regional Library Facility [NRLF]) were digitized by Google in 2017 as part of the Google Library Project. The resulting scans were uploaded to both HathiTrust and Google Books. UC has also partnered with Google to digitize dissertations and theses from UC Berkeley, UC Santa Cruz, and UCSF, all of which are also in HathiTrust, which means that UC Davis’ model could be used by these campuses as well – given staff availability.

The UC Davis Archives and Special Collections team had long wanted to conduct an outreach effort to open theses and dissertations in HathiTrust, but did not have the bandwidth until the COVID-19 pandemic changed everything. In the past, the team reached out to an author only when their thesis or dissertation was requested through interlibrary loan. This process had introduced them to the challenges and rewards of tracking down and contacting alumni authors, so the team knew what a larger scale project would entail. Then working from home actually provided the opportunity required for such an initiative.”

Harmon | ETDplus Toolkit [Tool Review] | Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication

Abstract:  Electronic theses and dissertations (ETDs) have traditionally taken the form of PDFs and ETD programs and their submission and curation procedures have been built around this format. However, graduate students are increasingly creating non-PDF files during their research, and in some cases these files are just as or more important than the PDFs that must be submitted to satisfy degree requirements. As a result, both graduate students and ETD administrators need training and resources to support the handling of a wide variety of complex digital objects. The Educopia Institute’s ETDplus Toolkit provides a highly usable set of modules to address this need, openly licensed to allow for reuse and adaption to a variety of potential use cases.

 

Toward scientific dissemination of undergraduate thesis in physical therapy programs – a cross-sectional study | BMC Medical Education | Full Text

Abstract:  Background

The execution of undergraduate thesis is a period in which students have an opportunity to develop their scientific knowledge. However, many barriers could prevent the learning process. This cross-sectional study aimed to analyze the scientific dissemination of results from undergraduate theses in physical therapy programs and verify the existence of barriers and challenges in the preparation of undergraduate thesis. Second, to investigate whether project characteristics and thesis development barriers were associated with the dissemination of undergraduate thesis results.

Methods

Physical therapists who graduated as of 2015, from 50 different educational institutions, answered an online questionnaire about barriers faced during the execution of undergraduate thesis and about scientific dissemination of their results.

Results

Of 324 participants, 43% (n?=?138) of participants disseminated their results, and the main form of dissemination was publishing in national journals (18%, n?=?58). Regarding the barriers, 76% (n?=?246) of participants reported facing some difficulties, and the main challenge highlighted was the lack of scientific knowledge (28%, n?=?91). Chances of dissemination were associated with barriers related to scientific understanding and operational factors, such as the type of institution, institutional facilities, and involvement with other projects.

Conclusion

Scientific knowledge seems to be a determining factor for the good development of undergraduate theses. In addition, it is clear the need to stimulate more qualified dissemination that reaches a larger audience. Changes in operational and teaching factors may improve the undergraduate thesis quality. However, the importance of rethinking scientific education within physical therapy programs draws attention.

How To Reuse Your Prior Publications in Your Thesis/Dissertation – Harvard Library Calendars – Harvard Library

“Are you a Harvard student working on your thesis or dissertation? Do you want to reuse your prior publications as chapters? In this virtual January@GSAS workshop led by the Harvard Library Office for Scholarly Communication, you will learn how to read your publishing agreements for comprehension so that you can feel confident about your ability to reuse your work and understand the conditions under which you may also share it publicly in DASH, Harvard’s open-access institutional repository. Get tips for exploring publisher policies and asking permission for reuse. Open to all graduate students. Contact the Office for Scholarly Communication with questions about the event and accessibility.”

Electronic Theses and Dissertations Bibliography

“The Electronic Theses and Dissertations Bibliography includes selected English-language articles and books that are useful in understanding electronic theses and dissertations….

Most sources have been published from 2000 through 2020; however, a limited number of earlier key sources are also included. The bibliography has links to included works. Such links, even to publisher versions, are subject to change. Where possible, this bibliography uses Digital Object Identifier System (DOI) URLs….”