Digital Knowledge Sharing Workshop Keynote with Stephen Curley – YouTube

“The keynote event of the APS’s Library & Museum’s 4th annual Digital Knowledge Sharing workshop was hosted by the APS’s Center for Native American and Indigenous Research (CNAIR) and the Native American Scholars Initiative (NASI), supported by the Mellon Foundation.

This virtual keynote conversation event featured Stephen Curley, Director of Digital Archives for the National Native American Boarding Schools Healing Coalition, in conversation with Brian Carpenter, Curator of Indigenous Materials at the APS’s Library & Museum. The conversation covered topics such as processes for Tribal and non-Tribal archives to reach out to each other to foster ethical stewardship and curation of Indigenous archival materials, current efforts in the digital curation of Native American boarding school resources, the centrality of honoring and acknowledging relationships versus academic tendencies of individualistic work, and a look back and look forward at developments in the archives field surrounding ethical best practices in culturally responsive care and curation of Indigenous archival collections.”

Open Scholarship Priorities and Next Steps: Proceedings of a Workshop–in Brief |The National Academies Press

“The Roundtable on Aligning Incentives for Open Science of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine brings together stakeholders to discuss the effectiveness of current incentives for adopting open science practices, barriers to adoption, and ways to move forward. According to the 2018 report Open Science by Design: Realizing a Vision for 21st Century Research, open science “aims to ensure the free availability and usability of scholarly publications, the data that result from scholarly research, and the methodologies, including code or algorithms that were used to generate those data.” With the Roundtable coming to the end of its initial phase, a virtual workshop, held December 7, 2021, provided an opportunity to review lessons learned over the past 3 years and discuss next steps for Roundtable members, the National Academies, and others interested in advancing open science and open scholarship. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussion of the workshop.”

LYROpen Fair Session 3: Evaluating and Supporting | LYRASIS | Aviary

“How do you decide which open publications to support? Which open publications will most adequately reflect the values of your institution? And once you have made that decision, how do you justify supporting open content to your administration? During this session speakers from different institutions will discuss how they evaluate and advocate for financially supporting open content initiatives.”

Open Access and conference papers in engineering disciplines

“In February 2020, CESAER published a position paper (CESAER, 2020) expressing its support for further strengthening of Open Science and Open Access in Horizon Europe. The importance of Open Access publishing of conference materials was explicitly mentioned due to its importance to universities of science & technology (S&T). As a follow-up to this position, this paper explores the current workflows around making conference papers in the Engineering disciplines openly available at a number of CESAER Member institutions. Recent initiatives aimed to make Open Access the default scholarly communications standard (e.g. the Plan S initiative) have mostly put emphasis on journal research articles, but conference papers and proceedings are also a key research output at the universities of S&T united in CESAER. This papers explores how large the fraction of conference papers is against the total number of research outputs, how often they are being published Open Access and what actions may be envisioned to increase their accessibility and mid- and long-term visibility….”

LYROpen Fair Session 2: Exploring Open Content | LYRASIS @ Aviary

 

There are myriad models for supporting open publications, and keeping track of all the terminology can feel overwhelming. What is the difference between green, gold and diamond OA? Is Subscribe to Open the same thing as Opening the Future? And what exactly do people mean when they talk about transformative agreements?

No one model can sustainably transition all scholarly content to open, so in this session we will attempt to remove confusion surrounding the various options being offered to libraries. In this introductory webinar the presenters will simply and clearly explain the different revenue models for supporting open content, specifically related to electronic open books and open journals, as well as provide an overview of which models are currently being supported through LYRASIS Open initiatives. Handouts will be distributed during this session as a reference guide for future decision making.

The OA Switchboard: How a Simple, Collaborative Solution Tackles Multiple Use Cases for Funders, Institutions and Publishers, Strategically and Practically

Abstract:  Yvonne Campfens, executive director of the OA Switchboard, presented an overview of the Switchboard and shared pre-recorded statements from a panel of user-stakeholders: Liz Bal and Jennifer Sanchez-Davies of Jisc, Alex Howat of the Microbiology Society, and Adam Der of the Max Planck Digital Library. Throughout her presentation, Campfens also shared quotes from interviews conducted with representatives of research funding organizations, publishers, and research institutions. The comments from the panelists and interviewees served to illustrate the potential benefits of the OA Switchboard for organizations which are producing, supporting, and transitioning to Open Access (OA) publishing.

 

OER Publishing and Libraries

Abstract:  This presentation explored current library Open Educational Resources (OER) publishing practices and presented research results on those practices. This original research surveyed academic librarians involved in OER publication projects to begin to address the need for expanded dialogue and the development of best practices for publishing OER. The survey results illustrate a broad picture of current practices and serves as a foundation for creating a best practice guide for library OER publishing. The presentation addressed author recruitment and marketing, publishing tools and platforms, and publishing support outside the library.

 

#RLUK22: Making Open Access Books Work Fairly: establishing collaboration between libraries, publishers, and infrastructure providers | Community-Led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs (COPIM)

Outline: Open Access (OA) book publishing, and the way it is funded, is changing. 2020 and 2021 saw the emergence of several new OA monograph initiatives based on collective library funding. Cambridge UP started Flip It Open, MIT Press launched Direct 2 Open and Liverpool UP and the Central European University Press launched Opening the Future. This session will give attendees a better understanding of the associated challenges facing libraries, publishers and scholars and will position these in the context of recent policy developments (UKRI OA monograph policy, the next REF, Plan S) and the rapidly developing OA landscape.  

Run by the non-profit, international COPIM Project, presentations and informal breakouts will give participants an understanding of a number of emerging OA book funding models and infrastructures that support smaller presses, based not on Book Processing Charges (BPCs) but on collective library funding. We’ll talk about how libraries might evaluate which OA book programmes align best with their institution and deliver the most relevant benefits. And we’ll discuss the importance of collaborative approaches for publishers and libraries, with a particular focus on the COPIM Project’s different types of collaboration, including Open Book Collective and Opening the Future: two OA monograph partnerships between libraries, publishers, and infrastructure providers.

 

#RLUK22: Making Open Access Books Work Fairly: establishing collaboration between libraries, publishers, and infrastructure providers | Community-Led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs (COPIM)

Open Access (OA) book publishing, and the way it is funded, is changing. 2020 and 2021 saw the emergence of several new OA monograph initiatives based on collective library funding. Cambridge UP started Flip It Open, MIT Press launched Direct 2 Open and Liverpool UP and the Central European University Press launched Opening the Future. This session will give attendees a better understanding of the associated challenges facing libraries, publishers and scholars and will position these in the context of recent policy developments (UKRI OA monograph policy, the next REF, Plan S) and the rapidly developing OA landscape.  

Run by the non-profit, international COPIM Project, presentations and informal breakouts will give participants an understanding of a number of emerging OA book funding models and infrastructures that support smaller presses, based not on Book Processing Charges (BPCs) but on collective library funding. We’ll talk about how libraries might evaluate which OA book programmes align best with their institution and deliver the most relevant benefits. And we’ll discuss the importance of collaborative approaches for publishers and libraries, with a particular focus on the COPIM Project’s different types of collaboration, including Open Book Collective and Opening the Future: two OA monograph partnerships between libraries, publishers, and infrastructure providers.

 

OSC 2022: “Scholarly Communication in the Open Science framework: The Diamond Open Access model” – YouTube

“Presntation by Suzanne Dumouchel // Huma-Num (CNRS), France

The talk will present the Action Plan for Diamond Open Access, developed by Science Europe, cOAlition S, OPERAS, and the French National Research Agency (ANR). The goal of the Action Plan is to further develop and expand a sustainable, community-driven Diamond OA scholarly communication ecosystem. The Action Plan proposes to align and develop common resources for the entire Diamond OA ecosystem, including journals and platforms, while respecting the cultural, multilingual, and disciplinary diversity that constitutes the strength of the sector. It focuses on four central elements: efficiency, quality standards, capacity building, and sustainability, following up on the recommendations of the ‘Open Access Diamond Journals Study’. ”

OSC 2022: “Mitigating risks of cumulative advantage in the transition to Open Science … ” – YouTube

“This talk will summarise work done within the EC Horizon2020 project ON-MERRIT (2019-2022, https://on-merrit.eu/) to investigate risks of cumulative advantage in the transition to Open Science. Open Science holds the promise to make scientific endeavours more inclusive, participatory, understandable, accessible, and re-usable for large audiences. However, making processes open will not per se drive wide re-use or participation unless also accompanied by the capacity (in terms of knowledge, skills, financial resources, technological readiness and motivation) to do so. These capacities vary considerably across regions, institutions and demographics. Those advantaged by such factors will remain potentially privileged, putting Open Science’s agenda of inclusivity at risk of propagating conditions of “cumulative advantage”. Since 2019, the EC Horizon2020 project ON-MERRIT has been investigating these issues using scientometric, sociological and other approaches to examine how these factor influence the ways in which Open Science is taken up (and by whom). As ON-MERRIT concludes, this talk will showcase diverse findings across areas including OA publishing, rewards and incentives and participatory methods. I then concludes by presenting recommendations to mitigate threats co-created with the Open Science community.”

OSC 2022: “Scholarly Communication in the Open Science framework: The Diamond Open Access model” – YouTube

“The talk will present the Action Plan for Diamond Open Access, developed by Science Europe, cOAlition S, OPERAS, and the French National Research Agency (ANR). The goal of the Action Plan is to further develop and expand a sustainable, community-driven Diamond OA scholarly communication ecosystem. The Action Plan proposes to align and develop common resources for the entire Diamond OA ecosystem, including journals and platforms, while respecting the cultural, multilingual, and disciplinary diversity that constitutes the strength of the sector. It focuses on four central elements: efficiency, quality standards, capacity building, and sustainability, following up on the recommendations of the ‘Open Access Diamond Journals Study’.”

COAPI Community Call: Catalyzing a US Repository Network – YouTube

“Tina Baich, the SPARC VPO for the US Repository Network and Senior Associate Dean for Scholarly Communication & Content Strategies at IUPUI University Library, will report on the US Repository Network Project, work supported by SPARC and COAR (Confederation of Open Access Repositories).

January 2021 COAPI Community Call: Catalyzing a US Repository Network The US Repository Network project is a partnership between the Confederation of Open Access Repositories (COAR) and Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC) led by Visiting Program Officer Tina Baich. An outgrowth of COAR’s work in the repository space, the project seeks to assist in breaking down institutional silos and developing a more cohesive approach and greater collaboration around repositories in the US. The first step was to convene an expert group of both Library Deans/Directors and IR managers from academic institutions to develop a strategic vision for repositories in the United States. The next step is to solicit broader input from the library/repository community to refine and finalize that vision. During this community call, Tina will join us to share the results of the convening and to hear from the COAPI community.”