LIBER 2021 Session #5: How Can Open Infrastructures Support the Role of Research Libraries? – YouTube

“Please find here the recording of the LIBER 2021 Session #5: How Can Open Infrastructures Support the Role of Research Libraries? The slides can be accessed through the following link: https://zenodo.org/record/5044765#.YO…

Description: In the first presentation, Fidan Limani explores the integration of scholarly artifacts from the domain of economics using Knowledge Graphs (KG). An initial version of the KG is presented and discussed, all the while keeping a library perspective on the process. Use cases enabled by this approach are also deliberated on, such as opportunities for researchers to interact with multiple facets of a research endeavour (in terms of research deliverables), cases that involve resource complementarity, or those that involve certain research deliverables across providers or collection origin. A final item to discuss includes the methodology used to design, develop, and maintain the current KG and its future extension. In the second presentation, James MacGregor, Niels Stern, Silvio Peroni and Joanna Ball discuss the benefits of Open Infrastructure for libraries. Libraries benefit from Open Infrastructure, including projects such as the Directory of Open Access Books (DOAB), OAPEN, OpenCitations, and Open Journal Systems (OJS), by receiving access to free content and services that help in establishing quality and discoverability. However, they offer libraries much more than just cost-free alternatives to commercial infrastructures. They are also Open in the sense that they have community-based governance models and opportunities for community input into their future developments and directions. In this presentation , we will hear from three Open Infrastructures currently supported by the SCOSS program – discussing how they involve contributing libraries in their governance. In the third and final presentation, Emilie Blotière and Tiziana Lombardo address two services provided by OPERAS and funded by the European Commission – the Research for Society service, under the COESO project (Swafs call) and the Discovery platform for Social Science and Humanities resources (data and publications, profiles and projects), under the TRIPLE project (INFRAEOSC call). The talk will include an introduction of OPERAS and the two services, a discussion on the interoperability and complementarity between these platforms, and an explanation on how the complementarity facilitates institutional funding….”

The Future Is Open Access, but How Do We Get There?: Keynote with Heather Joseph – YouTube

“Each year, more and more scholarly works are made openly available. Indeed, with European research agencies now coordinating to require immediate open access to publications based on research they fund, predictions about the inevitability of open access may soon come true.

As open access becomes the norm, what decisions will scholars, libraries, and institutions make? Will we reproduce existing power structures, guaranteeing the continued dominance of high-profit publishers and flawed impact metrics? Or will we build something different — community-led publishing on community-owned infrastructure, with legal terms that protect the rights and privacy of authors and readers? We explored these questions in a symposium hosted by METRO Library Council on Thursday, September 12 and Friday, September 13. This event was planned in collaboration with colleagues from the City University of New York. This video features our keynote with Heather Joseph of SPARC. Many thanks to Heather for sharing her insights and wisdom!”

eBook Licensing in Europe and the Vanishing Library? – YouTube

“Unaffordable prices, an inability to buy eBooks due to a refusal to sell, bundling of unwanted titles in packages, and restrictions on research copying all affect access to eBooks in all types of libraries.

Confidentiality clauses in contracts between publishers and universities are also making understanding how the eBook market functions more challenging, and obscuring whether public money is being well-spent. The #ebooksos campaign has successfully highlighted via the BBC and the Guardian the issues faced by the education and research sectors in accessing and using e-Books. The same issues are also being faced by public libraries across Europe. This session will explore in depth the acute difficulties faced not just by higher education, but also by public libraries, caused by publishers’ pricing and licensing practices, and discuss possible solutions, including the potential to solve many of the problems with legal solutions in copyright law that allow Controlled Digital Lending. It will also include information about the Knowledge Rights 21 Programme (KR21), an initiative led by Stichting IFLA Foundation, setting out its aim to achieve and implement reforms to copyright law, regulation and practice that enable knowledge institutions to provide significantly greater possibilities to access and use copyright works. Working with public, national, educational, health and research libraries, universities and the wider access to knowledge movement, KR21 aims to promote copyright reform at the European and national levels, and through its work leave a lasting legacy that influences similar developments elsewhere in the world….”

Strategy and Membership Webinar: Recording now available | arXiv.org blog

“arXiv envisions its future as a central hub for accessing open research, aiming to make its vast scientific content highly accessible and interoperable for the benefit of the community — and to maximize the impact of the research produced. On June 30, 2021, more than 225 people joined arXiv’s Strategy and Membership Webinar to learn how we are working together with our diverse community to reinvent scientific communications. The recording is now available for viewing….”

Open Science Diplomacy – www.science-diplomacy.eu

The presentation builds on the S4D4C case study on Open Science Diplomacy. It includes basic information about Open Science and its benefits and challenges for Science Diplomacy in the light of European efforts in the context of “Open Innovation, Open Science, Open to the World” (Moedas 2016).

OPERAS Open Chats: Wir müssen reden… heute über OPERAS Services für (Hochschul-)Verlage (We need to talk… today about OPERAS services for (university) publishers) | Zenodo

Töpfer, Marlen. (2021, June). OPERAS Open Chats: Wir müssen reden… heute über OPERAS Services für (Hochschul-)Verlage. Zenodo. http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.4971766

Presentation of the event on the OPERAS Infrastructure held by OPERAS-GER on 15 June 2021.

Save the date: DARIAH Open Access Book Bursary Q&A session

In May 2021, DARIAH-EU launched an annual Open Access Monograph Bursary for the publication of one’s first monograph within the domain of Digital Humanities. This initiative aims to support early career researchers to openly disseminate their first monographs in book series relevant to their field, and thus pave pathways to open research culture for arts and humanities disciplines. The bursary will fund the Open Access publication of one monograph (or other long form of scholarship) per year. 

The call for the 2021 DARIAH Open Access Monograph Bursary is currently open. The deadline for applications is December 6, 2021.

Q&A session – Bring Your Questions

To support applicants and interested researchers, we will host a Q&A information session on the eligibility criteria for participation in the call on the 25th of June at 10:00-11:00 CEST. 

FOCUS ON OPEN SCIENCE: CHAPTER XXXII: STOCKHOLM

“Open Science describes the current transition in how research is undertaken, how the outputs are stored and disseminated, how researchers collaborate, how success is measured and how researchers are rewarded for more transparent and collaborative approaches. Open Science has the potential to transform the research landscape. This potential has been successfully tested – if only that – during pandemic times. 

Open Science started as a vision, aiming to address matters like research reproducibility and access to the results of publicly-funded research. The vision was generally welcome by academic and research institutions and benefited from a great advocacy movement. It’s high time now to build on practice and effective management. 

It is generally accepted in Europe that research should be as open as possible and as close as necessary. Finding the borderline between the two is one of the most important tasks for practitioners, whether they belong to funders, research organisations, their partners or researchers themselves.

Yet, this borderline is not sufficiently explored. Guidelines based on feedback and learning from practice should be created, rather sooner than later.

This innovative approach to research has further potential: to address existing inequalities and matters like inclusivity, ethics, better assessment or the missing links between science and society or to re-shape public-private partnerships.

Emphasizing research practices, we will discuss the role of research organisations to support this transition, both acting local and internationally.

The results of the workshops will be captured in a formal report. The report is intended to be used by all involved partners, to advance the implementation of Open Science in their communities and their own institutions….”

Making Open Science the new normal for transport research

“The BE OPEN project final event was held online on June 9th, 2021, shedding light on the topic of “Making Open Science the new normal for transport research”.

Programme and presentations of the event are available on the project page: https://beopen-project.eu/events/making-open-science-the-new-normal-for-transport-research …”

 

“No Publication Favelas! Latin America’s Vision for Open Access” by Monica Berger | ACRL 2021 presentation

by Monica Berger, CUNY New York City College of Technology

Abstract: Open access was intended to be the great equalizer but its promise has not come to fruition in many lower-income countries of the Global South. Under-resourcing is only one of the many reasons why these scholars and publishers are marginalized. In order to examine inequality in our global scholarly communications system, we can compare a negative and a positive outgrowth of this imbalance. Predatory publishing represents a a weak imitation of traditional, commercial journal publishing. In contrast, Latin America’s community-based, quality scholarly infrastructure is anti-colonial. It can be argued that Latin America’s publishing infrastructure represents one solution to predatory publishing. As the future of open access is debated, it is critical that we look to Latin America as we support new models that reject legacy commercial journal publishing and support bibliodiversity.

Jeffrey Beall infamously called Brazil’s SciELO a “publishing favela” or slum. Yet Latin America represents an important exception to the problem of underdevelopment of scholarly communications in the Global South. In order to begin to better understand the marginalization of the Global South and Latin America’s success, we need to unpack the history of open access, its overemphasis on the reader as opposed to the author, and how notions of development influenced its discourse. This focus on the reader is neo-Colonialist, positioning scholars from the Global South as “downloaders” and not “uploaders,” whose scholarship is peripheral.

Lacking alternative publishing options, predatory publishing, or amateurish, low quality publishing, exploited this gap. In its pathetic imitation of international, corporate publishing, predatory publishing is neo-Colonial and a form of “faux” open access where subaltern authors, editors, and publishers poorly imitate Global North corporate publishing. Predatory publishing is a sad simulacra with real world damage. Since predatory publishing is overwhelming based in the Global South and many of its authors based in the Global South, it tarnishes the reputation of all scholarship from less developed countries. In contrast, predatory authorship and publishing are rare in Latin America.

Latin America is an exemplar of sustainable and humane open access. Heather Morrison deemed Latin American as a “long-time peerless leader in open access.” The advent of Plan S, a rapid flip to open access, is accelerating the co-option of open access by large, commercial publishers predicating a variety of negative outcomes. In contrast, the Latin American concept of bibliodiversity represents an important alternative model. No one size fits all and a local vision governs. Bibliodiversity interrogates the presumption that all scholarship must be English-language. It also values indigenous and local knowledge as well as lay readers. Redalyc and SciELO include measures for research collaboration. Various regional scholarly organizations cooperate, sharing expertise, providing training in editorial and technical best practices. This cooperation has expanded to a global scale. The Confederation of Open Access Repositories and SPARC are partnering with LA Referencia and others, expanding Latin America’s vision globally, generating a meaningful alternative model for open access.

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Slides with talk transcript and sources as presented at the Association of College and Research Libraries conference, ACRL 2021: Ascending into an Open Future, held virtually, April 16, 2021.