Will There Be Libraries in 25 Years?  | Time

“But just as the Web increased people’s access to information exponentially, an opposite trend has evolved. Global media corporations—emboldened by the expansive copyright laws they helped craft and the emerging technology that reaches right into our reading devices—are exerting absolute control over digital information. These two conflicting forces—towards unfettered availability and completely walled access to information—have defined the last 25 years of the Internet. How we handle this ongoing clash will define our civic discourse in the next 25 years. If we fail to forge the right path, publishers’ business models could eliminate one of the great tools for democratizing society: our independent libraries.

These are not small mom-and-pop publishers: a handful of publishers dominate all books sales and distribution including trade books, ebooks, and text books. Right now, these corporate publishers are squeezing libraries in ways that may render it impossible for any library to own digital texts in five years, let alone 25. Soon, librarians will be reduced to customer service reps for a Netflix-like rental catalog of bestsellers. If that comes to pass, you might as well replace your library card with a credit card. That’s what these billion-dollar-publishers are pushing.

 

The libraries I grew up with would buy books, preserve them, and lend them for free to their patrons. If my library did not have a particular book, then it would borrow a copy from another library for me. In the shift from print to digital, many commercial publishers are declaring each of these activities illegal: they refuse libraries the right to buy ebooks, preserve ebooks, or lend ebooks. They demand that libraries license ebooks for a limited time or for limited uses at exorbitant prices, and some publishers refuse to license audiobooks or ebooks to libraries at all, making those digital works unavailable to hundreds of millions of library patrons….”

Library Publishing Workflows Project Releases Journal Workflow Documentation | Educopia Institute

“There is no single correct way for a library to publish journals; it’s a process that often grows organically in response to local needs. However, having models to draw from when creating or updating a journal publishing workflow can result in better processes and stronger partnerships. 

To enable library publishers to build on each others’ work in this area, the Library Publishing Workflows project (IMLS 2019-2022) is excited to release a complete set of journal publishing workflow documentation for each of our twelve partner libraries.

 

The programs behind these workflows are large and small, high-touch and light-touch, and staffed and focused in a variety of ways. Individually, they offer models for similar programs. As a set, they highlight the diversity of practice in this vital area of librarianship. 

For each partner library, we have provided a program profile, one or more workflow diagrams, and accompanying detailed workflows. We are also releasing the workflow diagrams as a set, to enable quick review and comparison across all of the workflows. The documentation is the result of more than two years of interviews, revisions, group discussions, and peer reviews. Because publishing workflows are always evolving, however, this documentation represents a snapshot in time….”

Springer Nature and the Council of Australian University Librarians (CAUL) Announce New Partnership

Following Springer Nature’s successful transformative agreements (TAs) in Europe and North America, the company is pleased to announce its first TA in the Asia-Pacific region. The agreement with the Council of Australian University Librarians (CAUL) will give members of the CAUL consortium the ability to publish their research open access (OA) in over 2000 journals[1], making it CAUL’s largest TA to date.

Making Open Access Book Funding Work Fairly: The Emergence of Library Membership Funding Models for OA Monographs | National Acquisitions Group

Covid-19 has thrown many aspects of university research culture into acute relief. As the reality of the virus dawned and campuses worldwide went into lockdown, publishers rushed to open their publications by removing paywalls. Physical collections became inaccessible and demand for openly accessible research skyrocketed. Many publishers made topical works and more general material openly available, through their own sites or collective platforms. Researchers, libraries and students worldwide keenly felt the benefits of such open access. However, the challenge now is to cement these open publication practices with sustainable business models.

In late 2020, COPIM, an Arcadia and Research England funded project, announced an innovative model to sustainably fund open access (OA) monographs, Opening the Future. This initiative is an attempt to use the window of opportunity opened by Covid and is designed to be part of a new infrastructure that will facilitate a more open future for scholarly comms.

The model harnesses the power of collective library funding: increasing collections through special access to highly-regarded backlists, and expanding the global shared OA collection while providing a less risky path for smaller publishers to make frontlist monographs OA. We introduced this model at UKSG and RLUK in 2021 but this is no ‘story so far’ conference presentation proposal. Since Opening the Future launched, we’ve seen several other collective library funding models emerge in quick succession, including MIT’s Direct 2 Open, Michigan’s Fund to Mission, and Cambridge University Press’ Flip it Open. In the same year, UKRI’s new policy was announced and it included OA requirements for
monographs. The landscape is changing rapidly – in this presentation we will appraise our model in the context of the changing environment.

The programme has had success since its launch. Within a few months the first publisher to adopt the model, CEU Press, had accrued enough library support to fund their first three OA monographs. Soon thereafter the initiative was recognised by the publishing community and nominated for an ALPSP Award for Innovation in Publishing. And in June a second well-respected publisher, Liverpool University Press, launched with Opening the Future. COPIM has now begun to turn its focus to the thorny problem of scaling up. But herein lies a tension.

OA monograph publishing needs to be sustainable not just for publishers, but also for libraries. Opening the Future was designed to be low-cost and simple, slotting into acquisitions budgets and existing library purchasing workflows. However, as we bring the programme to more university presses and libraries, how do we ensure we are not just adding to the OA labyrinth that libraries are attempting to navigate? How do we scale without increasing the administrative burden already on collections and scholarly communications teams, who are already picking through a tangle of transformative agreements, pay-to-publish deals, author affiliations, and legacy subscriptions?

In this session, we will engage the audience through these questions, as well as discuss the role of the programme in the wider policy landscape and how it is positioned alongside other emerging OA collective funding initiatives.

Our speaker:

Martin has appeared before the UK House of Commons Select Committee BIS Inquiry into Open Access, and been a steering-group member of the OAPEN-UK project, the Jisc National Monograph Strategy Group, the SCONUL Strategy Group on Academic Content and Communications, and the HEFCE Open Access Monographs Expert Reference Panel (2014), and the Universities UK OA Monographs Working Group (2016-). Martin is also an Executive Board Officer for punctum books, a Plan S Ambassador, and he co-founded the Open Library of Humanities.

@COPIMproject @Martin_Eve

Part of NAG Webinar Week 2021 #NAGWebinarWeek

Open Knowledge Licensing Coordinator | CRL

“The Center for Research Libraries (CRL) seeks an Open Knowledge Licensing Coordinator. The Open Knowledge Licensing Coordinator is responsible for advancing open knowledge on a global level through coordination of CRL’s licensing activities. Reporting to the Senior Director of Collections, Technology, and Partnerships, the Open Knowledge Licensing Coordinator plays a key role in identifying, negotiating, and procuring electronic resource offers and in coordinating and managing subscriptions and purchases. The Open Knowledge Licensing Coordinator works with research libraries, content providers, and the scholarly communications community on new and innovative models that advance open knowledge. CRL is in an exciting growth period and this position will be integral to helping the organization meet its aspirations. 

Based in Chicago, Illinois, CRL is an international consortium of university, college, and independent research libraries that works against historic, systemic inequities by: advancing open and equitable access to knowledge through partnerships that span open knowledge policy, infrastructure, and analytics; engaging in collections work grounded in anti-racist and post-custodial frameworks that support communities historically under-engaged by the organization; supporting collections as data development that enables expanded form of scholarly and professional engagement with the scholarly record; and by committing to the responsible operationalization of technology. …”

The Paper-To-Pixels Workaround Activists Want To Use To Keep Libraries Online

“Decades after the recording industry decided, however grudgingly, to accept people ripping CDs into digital-music files, librarians have yet to get an equivalent signature on a permission slip to do the same with books. 

 

But the continued plagues of online disinformation and pandemic-forced closings or cutbacks of library services may breathe more life into a concept called Controlled Digital Lending.

“CDL” is not a format but a framework: After they scan one copy of printed book, libraries can loan one digital copy at a time, using digital-rights-management software to impede readers from duplicating it. …”

Next steps for the Open Book Collective

“Over the course of the COPIM project, Work Package 2 has been in the process of developing a new online infrastructural intermediary that can sit between scholarly libraries and OA publishers and other initiatives, to deliver new and more sustainable sources of revenue. As mentioned in our last report, the organisation that will support this intermediary now has a name: Open Book Collective (OBC).

The OBC will respond to the need for new forms of collaborative interaction between publishers, researchers, universities, and scholarly libraries by offering a contextual platform that supports the promotion of open access publishing activities and facilitates collective funding support. OBC will be a non-profit incorporated entity legally founded in the UK and we expect soon to be able to confirm its precise organisational form….”

Adapt and Advance: Global community leaders highlight opportunities to drive openness and equity in scholarly publishing at the 15th Berlin Open Access Conference – Office of Scholarly Communication

Nearly 400 participants, representing hundreds of institutions and consortia from around the world, came together for the 15th Berlin Open Access Conference (B15) to discuss the ongoing transition of the scholarly publishing system to open access. Co-hosted by the University of California and the Open Access 2020 Initiative of the Max Planck Digital Library/Max Planck Society, the online conference placed particular emphasis on negotiation processes with publishers.

US Senate Finance Committee Presses Publishers on Library Ebook Contracts

“Earlier this year, Fight for the Future — a group of technology experts, policy makers, and creatives — launched a tool called Who Can Get Your Book, meant to highlight the challenges of accessibility and availability of ebooks in public schools and libraries, rural areas, and other communities where these disparities create burdens to information. It is but one organization seeking transparency around ebooks from publishers, and now, the US Senate Finance Committee is pushing for more.

Finance Committee Chair Ron Wyden (D., Oregon) and U.S. Representative Anna G. Eshoo (D., California) lead the latest charge, drafting a series of letters to the Big Five publishers to clarify their ebook contracts with public schools.

Ebook contracts are notoriously tricky. For libraries, who can purchase print books and own them through their natural lifespan, ebooks come with restrictions on a number of fronts. They aren’t owned by the library and instead are licensed: at any time, the books may disappear or come with circulation limits, and those licenses come at astronomical prices. In cases where licenses can be negotiated with better terms for the library, costs only grow….”

An Update on Transformative Agreements | The HardiBlog – Blog for the NUI Galway Library

This blog post is an update to a previous post “SFI’s updated Open Access Policy – The Why and How”, published in February 2021. It explains what Transformative Agreements are and looks at why our researchers recently received a message saying that our Open Access allocations for 2021 for four publishers are due to run out before the end of the year. 

Momentum Builds: OA Agreement Task & Finish Groups – information power

“Over the past few months, the team at Information Power has been hard at work with our latest project. On behalf of cOAlition S and ALPSP, we have created four Task & Finish Groups and are planning two public events in order to help facilitate Open Access Agreements between Libraries/Consortia and small, independent publishers that can be used universally.

During September and October, we advertised our working groups and over 100 people signed up! This was an excellent result and was really heartening to see so many people that wanted to volunteer their valuable time and expertise to help an important project that could really benefit many people all over the world.

The first Task & Finish Group started in late September and is centred around devising a set of shared principles to underpin Open Access arrangements involving small publishers. The group has met three times so far and each meeting has been immensely successful, with lots of spirited debate and a new draft set of principles….”

Live Webinar: Open systems and library analytics – 1501970

“Open source software and interoperable services for library management and analytics provide libraries with more choice in how to deploy, support and develop mission-critical applications. Join this webinar to learn more about EBSCO’s support for FOLIO, the open source library services platform, and Panorama, an interoperable application for library analytics.”