New rule expands public access to federally funded research

“Public access to publicly funded research is an obvious social good,” said Donna Hayward, interim university librarian and dean of libraries. She said the new directive is a further step in a positive direction that’s been gaining momentum in the last decade.

“Of course, these policy changes will require adjustments to the ways some U-M researchers manage and publish their findings,” she said. “Fortunately, the library has quite a bit of expertise and infrastructure to help people prepare for and navigate the new standards and requirements.”

The Future of Online Lending: A Discussion of Controlled Digital Lending and Hachette with the Internet Archive | Berkman Klein Center

“The Internet Archive offers Controlled Digital Lending (CDL), where it lends digital copies of books to patrons — but ensures that the number of books owned is equal to the number loaned. Through the Open Library, the Internet Archive aims to “make all the published works of humankind available to everyone in the world.”

In June 2020, four major publishers sued the Archive for copyright infringement, alleging that CDL threatens their business model. 

Join us for a discussion with Brewster Kahle, founder and digital librarian of the Internet Archive, about the pending Hachette v. Internet Archive case and the future of digital libraries. Kahle will be joined by Rebecca Tushnet and Kyle Courtney, amici in the case, and Jonathan Zittrain.

The panel will explore the background of the case and the National Emergency Library, the value of CDL for online libraries and public access, CDL’s fair use implications, and the future of online libraries and large publishers….”

UCLA Library to expand global preservation work thanks to largest grant in its history | UCLA

Key takeaways:

In four years, the Modern Endangered Archives Program has published content from 11 collections, featuring more than 12,000 objects from 11 countries.
The program has preserved audio recordings, political ephemera, photography, newspapers and financial ledgers.
The preserved collections are publicly accessible and digitally preserved, while the physical materials remain in their origin countries.

 

Wiley withdrawing key ebook titles from library collections – evidence required please | #ebooksos – Campaign to investigate the ebook market for libraries

A conversation was bought to our attention on Twitter a few days ago that went like this

– In June my library was told that Wiley would be removing 1,379 ebooks from our subscription packages. Because many of these books were heavily used, we looked into purchasing them with perpetual access but were told they were considered textbooks.
So basically, because these books were heavily used, Wiley decided to stop letting libraries buy them as ebooks. To top it off, we lost access the second week of classes. Faculty had planned their courses around students having library access to the texts. #TextbookEquity

– This happened to us, too, except to my knowledge we weren’t told. We found out when students tried to access these texts.

– Same. And some of them are actually just out of print now. You can’t even buy them from Amazon

– Yes, same deal from Wiley in Australia in lead-up to start of 2nd semester.

We are also receiving emails from UK librarians who are experiencing the same issues. Wiley are withdrawing access to key reading materials just a week or two before the beginning of the new academic year. We need to hear how this is impacting your library so we can highlight this matter to the CMA and MPs.

 

Could the Internet Archive go out like Napster?

“Since the suit was filed, many of the authors who’d protested the archive have deleted their tweets or released statements explaining they’ve changed their minds. Wendig, who initially appeared to be leading the charge, has since stated several times that he is not involved with the case. And on July 14, the Authors Alliance, an organization that helps authors to reach more readers, filed an amicus brief in the lawsuit on behalf of the Internet Archive.

One thing hasn’t changed: fears that the vagaries of this case could cripple the archive and, subsequently, the myriad services it offers the 1.5 million people who visit it every day. In addition to lending books digitally, the Internet Archive hosts the Wayback Machine, a tool that has chronicled internet history since 1996; the concern is that if legal costs drain the archive of its funds, all of its services could be affected. Users of the site and digital archivists have compared the potential loss of the archive’s services to the burning of the Library of Alexandria. Yet book companies also view the stakes here as existential for their business model; the International Publishers Association stated that this case is of “global significance” to its members….”

Democratizing Open Knowledge | Library Innovation Lab

Democratizing Open Knowledge is a three-year program at the Library Innovation Lab to explore the goals articulated in Harvard Library’s Advancing Open Knowledge strategy from a decentralized and generative perspective. If you like what you see here and want to collaborate, get in touch!

In “Advancing Open Knowledge,” Harvard Library outlines three strategic goals for libraries:

Diversify and Expand Access to Knowledge

The information globe is still dominated by the wealthiest nations and by inequitable systems of producing and sharing knowledge that are not representative of all voices.

Enhance Discovery and Engagement

We are witnessing a rise in disinformation, coupled with distrust of sources established as trustworthy. Information discovery mechanisms are also far from ideal.

Preserve for the Future

Preservation of information, particularly digital information, is an unsolved problem: information can be here today and gone tomorrow….”

The Scholarly Communication Notebook | OER Commons

“The Scholarly Communication Notebook (SCN) is an active, inclusive, empowered community of practice for teaching scholarly communications to emerging librarians….

Welcome to the Scholarly Communication Notebook (SCN), an in-development repository of community-designed and curated open resources for teaching about scholarly communication and for doing scholarly communication work in libraries. We intend the SCN to be the locus of an active, inclusive, empowered community of practice for teaching scholarly communications to emerging librarians, where practitioners, LIS educators, and library students work together to increase knowledge and skills on topics of growing importance in librarianship and beyond; topics such as copyright, open access, open education, and library publishing (see Collections below for more topic areas). We hope these resources will be regularly refreshed by librarians and allies as well as by LIS faculty and by students completing coursework on these topics, and that mutually beneficial relationships and bridges are built between users. The SCN, and the resources collected here, complement an open book that is in production, Introduction to Scholarly Communication Librarianship: Law, Economics, and Culture.

 

The SCN is explicitly intended to support, educate and represent a diversifying workforce of LIS professionals. It intends to extend social justice values to all participants by intentionally and thoughtfully reflecting the broad range of people, institution types, and service models engaged in scholarly communication work. For more background see the OER + Scholarly Communication project site. We’re also reachable via email and on Twitter….”

Community Hubs for Citizen Science: Building Capacity through Libraries and Universities – LIBER Europe

“Citizen science aims to enable people of all ages, cultures, and skills to engage in real scientific research by collecting or analyzing data typically shared with professional scientists, while provenly increasing public understanding of science. SciStarter.org and Arizona State University, as well as LIBER, are building and scaling programs and resources to catalyze libraries as community hubs for citizen science.

As a result, libraries are supporting an evolving workforce and lifelong learners while addressing known critical barriers in citizen science infrastructure, including lack of 1) project awareness, 2) access to instruments, and 3) community connections.

LIBER Citizen Science Working Group and SciStarter are now organizing a three-part joint webinar series. In this first session, we will examine the realized and potential role of libraries in catalyzing and accelerating participatory science. Darlene Cavalier (SciStarter and Arizona State University, USA), Robin Salthouse (retired librarian and advisor to SciStarter, USA), and the Science shop/Boutique des sciences, University of Lille, France (to be confirmed) will share their experiences and resources to enable everyone to participate in this collaborative and open approach of research and science. Raphaëlle Bats (Urfist – University of Bordeaux, France) and Sara Decoster (KU Leuven, Belgium) will moderate the series….”

The OAPEN Dashboard – a new partner service  – OAPEN – supporting the transition to open access for academic books

During the UKSG 2022 Annual Conference held from May 30th to June 2nd in Telford UK we officially launched the OAPEN Dashboard1 – a new analytics service for our library members, publishers and funder partners to help them gain a deeper understanding of the usage of open access books. 

Over 179 publishers, libraries and funders are using the dashboard today and we expect to welcome more users over the coming months. The dashboard service includes data for the entire OAPEN Library which is home to over 24,000 open access books that see over 1 million COUNTER-conformant downloads per month.  

Panel Discussion: The Role of Publishers and Libraries in the Evolution of Open Research | September 19, 2022 | Library Journal

“The role of institutional libraries and of publishers continues to evolve along with the changing landscape of research dissemination. Open access publishing has paved the way for a broader open science or open research landscape that emphasizes the importance of sharing research elements across the scientific discovery process. Sharing across the lifecycle supports greater transparency, assists in reproducibility and replicability, and can speed up the dissemination of important research outcomes.  In the US, an increasing number of policies, practices, and guidelines are helping to encourage openness from data to code to publication. Institutional libraries are responding by providing leadership in the open science environment through activities like expanding support for grant compliance, helping facilitate data reuse, and working with organizations to build the necessary infrastructure to facilitate an open research process.  Publishers are likewise exploring new models, technologies, and processes to support greater openness and to shift away from a pay-to-read model. F1000’s innovative publishing model, for example, is designed to fully promote open science practices by requiring FAIR compliant data with submission, allowing for a broad variety of publication types beyond standard journal articles, and using open community peer review to validate research. In this panel discussion, representatives from State University of New York at Stony Brook, Library Journal, F1000 and Taylor & Francis will convene for an interactive discussion about the ways in which institutional libraries are collaborating with partners to advance open science principles, rigor and reproducibility, and research innovations.

Speakers:

Joseph Lerro – Open Research Business Development Manager, the Americas – F1000 and Taylor & Francis Group
Dr. Vitaly Citovsky, Ph.D./SUNY – Distinguished Professor, Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology – State University of New York at Stony Brook
Mona Ramonetti, Head of Scholarly Communication, Stony Brook University Libraries
Lisa Federer, Data Science and Open Science Librarian, National Library of Medicine…”

Libraries take charge

“The Open Access publishing landscape: why academic libraries are entering the Open Access publishing space….

Academic publishing is changing, and university libraries are becoming more intrinsically woven into the fabric of the new landscape. Although publishers affiliated with universities, such as Cambridge University Press and Oxford University Press, have been around for centuries, university libraries are now launching their own publishing and content hosting initiatives, usually with a sole focus on Open Access. If you’re not familiar with it, Open Access is part of a movement to facilitate the free exchange of knowledge and widen access globally. It often entails publishing academic articles, books, resources and content under public copyright licences, usually Creative Commons licenses, to enable free distribution and reuse of the work under certain conditions.

 

The past decade has seen the launch of several new university presses in the UK dedicated to publishing Open Access research, including Cardiff University Press (launched in 2014), UCL Press (2015), the University of Westminster Press (2015), White Rose Press (2016) and, most recently, the Scottish Universities Press (2022). At the same time, libraries have been carving out their own space in the publishing sphere, providing hosting solutions to their academics, staff and students. Initiatives include the University of St Andrews Journal Hosting Service, Liverpool John Moores University Open Journals Service and Edinburgh Diamond (which I manage)….”