What has the pandemic taught us about “Open Science”? | Berlin Science Week 2021

“The European Commission has made Open Science a policy priority because it “improves the quality, efficiency and responsiveness of research” and can increase creativity and “trust in science”. For nearly two years now the COVID-19 pandemic has put this vision of “Open Science” to the test.

With this panel discussion we will ask experts from research, publishing, science communication and journalism to share their thoughts on how central tenets of Open Science such as open data, open access, citizen science/public engagement, preprints, open review and alternative metrics fared during the turbo-charge race to understand a new virus. What effects have new Open Science practices had on the speed, quality and quantity of research and its translation into actionable solutions and policies? What unexpected challenges of openness have emerged in the pandemic? Finally, the thorny question that this panel will attempt to answer is whether Open Science can increase trust in science. Join the discussion in person in Berlin at the Humboldt Institute for Internet and Society….”

Building Structural Equity in Open Access | arXiv.org blog

“In celebration of International Open Access Week, arXiv will host a free panel discussion, Thirty Years of Open Access: Challenges and Opportunities for Building Structural Equity. This hybrid virtual and in-person event will feature open access leaders from arXiv, AfricArXiv, and UCLA. We’ll discuss how this movement has grown and evolved — and look ahead at the next 30 years to ask: what opportunities can we seize to ensure that the open access movement continues to equalize and democratize access to research? What challenges must we overcome to truly serve all researchers around the world?…”

Library Publishing Workflows Project Releases Journal Workflow Documentation | Educopia Institute

“There is no single correct way for a library to publish journals; it’s a process that often grows organically in response to local needs. However, having models to draw from when creating or updating a journal publishing workflow can result in better processes and stronger partnerships. 

To enable library publishers to build on each others’ work in this area, the Library Publishing Workflows project (IMLS 2019-2022) is excited to release a complete set of journal publishing workflow documentation for each of our twelve partner libraries.

 

The programs behind these workflows are large and small, high-touch and light-touch, and staffed and focused in a variety of ways. Individually, they offer models for similar programs. As a set, they highlight the diversity of practice in this vital area of librarianship. 

For each partner library, we have provided a program profile, one or more workflow diagrams, and accompanying detailed workflows. We are also releasing the workflow diagrams as a set, to enable quick review and comparison across all of the workflows. The documentation is the result of more than two years of interviews, revisions, group discussions, and peer reviews. Because publishing workflows are always evolving, however, this documentation represents a snapshot in time….”

bioRxiv & medRxiv; Communicating at the Speed of Science

“Preprint servers bioRxiv & medRxiv have experienced unprecedented growth and attention during these past 18 months as they have contributed to the scientific community’s collaborative response to the present international health crisis. The frequent reports in mass-media outlets alone, after January 2020, demonstrate that bioRxiv and medRxiv are becoming recognized Open Science digital repositories that are at the center of rapidly disseminating scientific research freely throughout the world.

Please join us on Oct 26th at 11am for our inaugural session during Open Access Week 2021 as the Harvard Library welcomes Richard Sever, Assistant Director Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press & Co-founder of the preprint servers bioRxiv and medRxiv. Dr. Sever will share his observations and reflections on the exponential growth and impact that preprints have had on advancing scientific communication during this unprecedented time.”

Program 2021 – Munin Conference on Scholarly Publishing

“The Munin Conference on Scholarly Publishing has a history going back to 2006. In connection with the official opening of Munin, the institutional repository of the University of Tromsø, two seminars were arranged. The first was in September marking the launch of Munin, the second was held in the end of November, looking at the effects of the Norwegian system for financing institutions in part based upon the publishing volume (and quality) of the institutions. This last seminar has evolved into the annual Munin conference.

In the years following 2006, the Munin Conference was held in Norwegian, often having a Norwegian focus, but gradually looking further and losing the local focus. From 2010 on the conference has been held in English only, previously we had some presentations in English and some in Norwegian. This all-English policy has enabled keynotes and other speakers to participate fully in the whole program, and to make Europe, not only Norway, the “market” for the conference.

Themes for the conferences have always been some aspect of scholarly/scientific publishing and communication, overwhelmingly with Open Access (OA) as an important aspect, but Open Access in itself has not been the only theme. Some of the themes for the conferences have been Entering the Next Stage (2013), New Trends in Scholarly Publishing (2012), Enhancing publications (2011), Open Access: The Competitive Advantage (2010), Time to review the peer review? (2009) and Money Talks: New institutional policies in scholarly publishing (2008). See the list of our keynotes since the start in 2006….”

Open and Inclusive Access to Research

“Open and Inclusive Access to Research is a four day virtual symposium, organised by Gimena Del Rio Riande, Daniel Paul O’Donnell, and Wouter Schallier. Primary funding was provided by the Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC), with addition financial and in-kind support provided by Eclac, Force11, and the Sloan Foundation through the Reimagining Educational Practices for Open (REPO) project. The coapplicants and collaborators on the proposal were Gimena Del Rio Riande, CONICET; Juan Pablo Alperin, Simon Fraser University; Wouter Schallier, ECLAC; and Tanja Niemann, Université de Montréal.

The goal of this workshop is to bring experts and early career research professionals from Canada and Latin America together in a bilingual workshop environment that will enable them to exchange knowledge and expertise about Open Research Practices in a strategic yet very hands-on manner, with panels and prominent speakers from both continents. Researchers and policy makers in both Canada and Latin America have played leading roles internationally in the area of Open and Inclusive access to research, and particularly in Open Access, Open Data, and Open Science and Scholarship as a means to achieve this. The goal of this workshop is to bring those experts and early career researchers together to discuss areas of convergence and difference in a more systematic way….”

Plan S & Scholarly Publishing Future: Challenges & Opportunities

“With ambitious promises to reshape scholarly publishing, Plan S supported by cOAlition S affects authors, publishers, libraries and all stakeholders in between.

Where are we now?

What Plan S challenges have been addressed?

What new obstacles have materialised?

This webinar aims to take stock of the journey made since the launch of Plan S, focusing on the evolution of Publishers, Open Access (OA) business models and the challenges and opportunities that remain open. Join a balanced panel of experts including publishers, researchers and cOAlition S policy makers to discuss Plan S implications moving forward. The webinar will be followed by a live Q&A session.”

61th Online Seminar: Open Access Publishing – Zooming in on Copyright and CC Licenses | Helmholtz Open Science

The 61st Helmholtz Open Science Online Seminar will take place on Wednesday, October 27, 2021 from 3:00 p. m. to 4:30 p. m.

In this seminar, the Helmholtz Open Science Office will present on the topic of “Open Access Publishing – Zooming in on Copyright and CC Licenses”. We will shortly look into Open Access Publishing and the options for researchers at Helmholtz in general and then zoom in on the topics of copyright (What does this mean for your research, writing and publication process?) and CC Licences (How can you make use of these licences to “free” your own research and to successfully engage in Open Science?). After the presentation by Dr Christoph Bruch (Helmholtz Open Science Office) there will be ample opportunity for open discussion.

Questions can be submitted in advance via the Open Knowledge Foundation Online Pad and will – if possible – be addressed during the course of the event: https://pad.okfn.de/p/61st_Helmholtz_Open_Science_Online_Seminar

The 90-minute event will be held in English and will be conducted via the video conferencing tool Zoom. The seminar will not be recorded.

To participate in the event (free of charge), please register in advance.

Making Open Access Book Funding Work Fairly: The Emergence of Library Membership Funding Models for OA Monographs | National Acquisitions Group

Covid-19 has thrown many aspects of university research culture into acute relief. As the reality of the virus dawned and campuses worldwide went into lockdown, publishers rushed to open their publications by removing paywalls. Physical collections became inaccessible and demand for openly accessible research skyrocketed. Many publishers made topical works and more general material openly available, through their own sites or collective platforms. Researchers, libraries and students worldwide keenly felt the benefits of such open access. However, the challenge now is to cement these open publication practices with sustainable business models.

In late 2020, COPIM, an Arcadia and Research England funded project, announced an innovative model to sustainably fund open access (OA) monographs, Opening the Future. This initiative is an attempt to use the window of opportunity opened by Covid and is designed to be part of a new infrastructure that will facilitate a more open future for scholarly comms.

The model harnesses the power of collective library funding: increasing collections through special access to highly-regarded backlists, and expanding the global shared OA collection while providing a less risky path for smaller publishers to make frontlist monographs OA. We introduced this model at UKSG and RLUK in 2021 but this is no ‘story so far’ conference presentation proposal. Since Opening the Future launched, we’ve seen several other collective library funding models emerge in quick succession, including MIT’s Direct 2 Open, Michigan’s Fund to Mission, and Cambridge University Press’ Flip it Open. In the same year, UKRI’s new policy was announced and it included OA requirements for
monographs. The landscape is changing rapidly – in this presentation we will appraise our model in the context of the changing environment.

The programme has had success since its launch. Within a few months the first publisher to adopt the model, CEU Press, had accrued enough library support to fund their first three OA monographs. Soon thereafter the initiative was recognised by the publishing community and nominated for an ALPSP Award for Innovation in Publishing. And in June a second well-respected publisher, Liverpool University Press, launched with Opening the Future. COPIM has now begun to turn its focus to the thorny problem of scaling up. But herein lies a tension.

OA monograph publishing needs to be sustainable not just for publishers, but also for libraries. Opening the Future was designed to be low-cost and simple, slotting into acquisitions budgets and existing library purchasing workflows. However, as we bring the programme to more university presses and libraries, how do we ensure we are not just adding to the OA labyrinth that libraries are attempting to navigate? How do we scale without increasing the administrative burden already on collections and scholarly communications teams, who are already picking through a tangle of transformative agreements, pay-to-publish deals, author affiliations, and legacy subscriptions?

In this session, we will engage the audience through these questions, as well as discuss the role of the programme in the wider policy landscape and how it is positioned alongside other emerging OA collective funding initiatives.

Our speaker:

Martin has appeared before the UK House of Commons Select Committee BIS Inquiry into Open Access, and been a steering-group member of the OAPEN-UK project, the Jisc National Monograph Strategy Group, the SCONUL Strategy Group on Academic Content and Communications, and the HEFCE Open Access Monographs Expert Reference Panel (2014), and the Universities UK OA Monographs Working Group (2016-). Martin is also an Executive Board Officer for punctum books, a Plan S Ambassador, and he co-founded the Open Library of Humanities.

@COPIMproject @Martin_Eve

Part of NAG Webinar Week 2021 #NAGWebinarWeek

Webinar | Coalition for Diversity and Inclusion in Scholarly Communications | SSP Society for Scholarly Publishing

“Open access and open science are attempts to ensure knowledge is as widely accessible as possible. More and more publishers are launching open access journals and embracing open science principles. Questions remain, however, as to whether open access and open science are currently accessible to all. The most visible notions of open access and open science are primarily founded in—and have perpetuated—the values and standards established by organizations, institutions, and funders in Western Europe and North America. Open access and open science can therefore continue to exclude the very researchers that these models are supposed to benefit. For example, business models like article processing charges do not account for unequal access to funding. Other issues not specific to open access are exclusionary English-language style standards and unconscious bias in the peer review process.

In this webinar, we will explore how models of openness have not always resolved, and in some instances may have created, inequitable barriers for some researchers. We will unpack the impact of those barriers on researchers and propose some ways to overcome them.”

All Things PrePrints: An Introduction

“The last year has seen a global spike in health and life science preprints. In June of 2020 the NIH even launched a pilot project to include COVID-19 related preprints in PubMed search results. This librarian shop talk will cover preprint definitions, how to locate them, and their impact as part of the biomedical research corpus. The event will conclude with discussion and myth busting of common concerns so librarians can talk knowledgeably with their users all things preprints at their own institutions. Two brief interactive break-outs will encourage participants to review the scope of preprints at their own institutions and address other common elements of concern.”

 

Proposal Submission Form – Rethinking Institutional Repositories: Innovations in Management, Collections, and Inclusion

“Proposal Submission Form – Rethinking Institutional Repositories: Innovations in Management, Collections, and Inclusion

Please complete the form below to submit a proposal. If you have any questions, please contact Josh Cromwell (joshua.cromwell@usm.edu)….”

Open Science and Data Policy Developments: Virtual SciDataCon 2021 Strand – CODATA, The Committee on Data for Science and Technology

“Virtual SciDataCon 2021 is organised around a number of thematic strands.  This is the third of a series of announcements presenting these strands to the global data community. Please note that registration is free, but participants must register for each session they wish to attend.

The  COVID-19 pandemic has demonstrated some of the benefits of Open Science practices, while highlighting persistent shortcomings in current science system. The deepening climate crisis underlines the need for targeted data gathering and action oriented research. In the policy sphere, 2021 started with the adoption of the ‘Recommendation of the OECD Council concerning Access to Research Data from Public Funding’.  November should see the adoption of a Recommendation on Open Science by the UNESCO General Conference: a major achievement which it is hoped will have a mobilising effect on Members States world-wide. The UNESCO Recommendation defines shared values and principles for Open Science, and identifies concrete measures on Open Science, with proposals to bring citizens closer to science and commitments to facilitate the production and dissemination of scientific knowledge around the world.

On Tuesday 19 October, SciDataCon will host a strand of session exploring these and other important Open Science and data policy developments.  Two sessions relate to the implementation of the OECD Recommendation. The third will include an update on the UNESCO Recommendation and other developments….”