DORA at 10: Looking back at the history and forward to the future of research assessment | DORA

“DORA will be 10 years old in May 2023 and we are planning to mark the occasion! We’ll be holding a weeklong celebration for DORA’s 10th Anniversary and we’re inviting you to join in by organizing an event on research assessment for your local community. We want to have conversations about what DORA has done and what we still need to do all over the globe! DORA’s 10th Anniversary Celebration will be comprised of two parts:

DORA’s 10th Anniversary Celebration will be comprised of two parts:

Two plenary online sessions to discuss the state of the field, our past decade of work, and our future plans.
A global program of local or regional events that will allow communities to share insights and challenges in reforming, innovating, and researching responsible research assessment policies and practices….”

Scholarship for the Public Good: Paths to Open Access – Calendar – CUNY Graduate Center’s Mina Rees Library

“Open access scholarly literature—roughly, scholarly works that are online and free of charge for all—has developed over the past 20 years from wild idea to widespread reality. Open access journals, books, and repositories are now established parts of the scholarly ecosystem, and many consider near-universal open access to be inevitable. 

But publishing itself is not cost-free, so how can open access be achieved? There are many possible paths, some now common, some more experimental. Which of these paths align with our values as researchers, and with the mission of the Graduate Center and CUNY as a whole? Which empower the research community? Which should we pursue, and which should we eschew?

The first event in the “Scholarship for the Public Good” series (learn more below) will explore various paths to open access. The event will feature three experts:

Peter Suber (Harvard University) will describe the institutional open access policies passed by the faculties of Harvard and many other universities.
Heather Paxson (MIT) will discuss the transition of society journal Cultural Anthropology from subscription-based to open access, and its ongoing quest to fund publication without article processing charges (APCs). 
Leslie Chan (University of Toronto) will examine high-profit publishers’ problematic approaches to open access (high APCs, vertical integration, and more)….”

Data sharing: what do we know and where can we go?

“OASPA is pleased to announce our next webinar which will focus on the what about and the why of data sharing.

The recent OSTP “Nelson memo” served as a re-focus on data as a first class research output. But maybe that’s a misrepresentation for those of us who think ‘hold on, we’ve been focused on data this whole time!?’ Well here’s a chance to learn from and with a group of experts who are thinking carefully about data sharing: what that means from different perspectives, tangible steps to take and policies to make around data, and what we can do next in our communities of practice. Attendees are more than welcome to bring their own perspectives! The webinar will be chaired by Rachael Lammey. We welcome our panelists: Sarah Lippincott will give a repository perspective with insights into where data is going post Nelson Memo and NIH Policy. Aravind Venkatesan will share the thinking, data science and workflows employed at EuropePMC to support data linking. Shelley Stall will talk about how AGU are leading the line with their data policies, and Kathleen Gregory will conclude by considering researchers’ perspectives regarding sharing and reusing data.”

Communicating about Open Access – ChronosHub

“In this webinar we’ll talk about the design element of communications around open access. We will hear about a recent study looking at indicators of open access for readers, and hear from a designer about visual consistency with respect to conceptual coherence in product design and the implications on user experience. After the short presentations we will move onto a discussion around the topic, and discussion of solutions that might make communication around open access easier for readers and authors.”

 

All Things Open Week 2023 | All Things Open | Conferences, Workshops, and Lectures | Kennesaw State University

“The Kennesaw State University (KSU) Libraries invite all interested parties to submit a proposal for inclusion at the inaugural All Things Open Week, April 3-7, a series of events dedicated to promoting inclusive and intentional open access practices regardless of discipline or audience. If you are passionate about open pedagogy, open data, or open science frameworks, consider sharing your perspective….”

Supporting open access publishing for books: myth-busting webinars event summary – Research

“As part of our work with UKRI to support the implementation of the UKRI open access policy for monographs, book chapters and edited collections published from 1 January 2024, we re-visited some of the key areas of concern for researchers that surfaced during the consultation period for the policy (see UUK Open access and monographs. Evidence review and Open access and monographs: Where are we now? A position paper by the British Academy).

There was a clear need for a focused period of engagement with key stakeholder groups such as researchers/academics across all career levels, librarians/scholarly communication managers, research offices, and rights holders, with the aim being to split the real issues from the perceived problems. As a result, we collaborated with a number of UK university presses and the Open Access Books Network to hold a series of webinars on the subject of the myths around open access for books, as well as to address legitimate concerns and suggest ways to remove barriers to open access publishing.

We held three 90-minute webinars, each consisting of three short presentations from a panel including authors, publishers, open access publishing support services and policy makers. These were then followed by a Q&A session where audience questions were invited. All sessions were chaired by an expert in the field of open access.

The opening session set the context and covered the key themes, and this was then followed by more focused sessions covering specific areas in more detail. You can find all the event recordings, transcripts, presentations, and our panels’ responses to the questions we didn’t have time to cover on our Events webpage and also via the links below….”

FAIRPoints-FAIRPoints ‘Ask me Anything’ (AMA) – SciLifeLab

“This event is part of a series of “Ask Me Anything”-style events featuring keynote speakers from the RDA, and EOSC groups focused on RDA activities and EOSC solutions in relation to FAIR implementation and Open practices in Science.”

DataCite Connect Gothenburg

“The DataCite Connect event in Gothenburg provides a forum for discussion and networking for DataCite members and the broader community. The session will focus on national PID and Open Science strategies and how the DataCite community can engage in, contribute to, and support their implementation. Participants will learn about on-going efforts across different regions and will have the chance to work together to identify and discuss alignments between national strategies and their current/future plans that leverage the DataCite infrastructure and services. The outcomes of the meeting will help DataCite members and community to better understand the PID landscape in other regions, connect with PID champions and establish new collaborations. There will be plenty of time for Q&A!

This is an in person event that will not be recorded or streamed. Slides of the speakers will be made available afterwards. Make sure to use the hashtag #DataCiteConnect23 when sharing your experience on socials….”

Open Science Conference 2023 | United Nations

“Since 2019, when the Dag Hammarskjöld Library held the 1st Open Science Conference at the United Nations Headquarters in New York, the global open movement has been significantly enriched with new national and international policies and frameworks as well as daring and visionary initiatives, both private and public.

At the 2nd Global Open Science Conference, From Tackling the Pandemic to Addressing Climate Change, in July 2021 more than a year into the pandemic that had upturned daily lives globally, participants from around the world engaged in a public dialogue focusing on what open science has learned from COVID-19 and how this can be applied into actions addressing the global climate crisis, at the interface of science, technology, policy and research. The Conference took stock of actions undertaken nationally and internationally, collected lessons learned and identified directions for the way forward. Open science was recognized as the keystone to assert everyone’s right “to share in scientific advancement and its benefits”. Speakers and audience asked for the complete overhaul of outdated scientific processes, publishing and research assessment practices that oppose open science principles, proposed global curation infrastructures for the record of science and platform-agnostic discovery services, as well as enhanced bibliodiversity, inclusivity, and multilingualism….”

Open Scholarship Café – Open Scholarship and Social Justice – Bookings – University of Galway Library

“Open Scholarship / Open Science has many drivers and “schools of thought” about its purpose. This Open Scholarship Café will not look at how to open up the research process, i.e. through the publication of data, methods or publications, but will look at Open Scholarship as a social movement. To look at why and how Open Scholarship interacts with social change, we are glad to have three speakers who will shed light on this topic.

Open Scholarship Cafés are organised by the Library of the University of Galway and the Open Scholarship Community Galway. For this Café we have partnered with MÓR – Maynooth Open Research who will co-host the session.

This Open Scholarship Café will be online on Zoom. You are all very welcome to register! See below details of speakers and their talks….”

Webinar: Data sharing: what do we know and where can we go? – OASPA

“OASPA is pleased to announce our next webinar which will focus on the what about and the why of data sharing.

The recent OSTP “Nelson memo” served as a re-focus on data as a first class research output. But maybe that’s a misrepresentation for those of us who think ‘hold on, we’ve been focused on data this whole time!?’ Well here’s a chance to learn from and with a group of experts who are thinking carefully about data sharing: what that means from different perspectives, tangible steps to take and policies to make around data, and what we can do next in our communities of practice. Attendees are more than welcome to bring their own perspectives!…”

Open Science Conference 2023 | United Nations

“On 23 November 2021, following an inclusive, transparent and multistakeholder consultative process, UNESCO’s Recommendation on Open Science was adopted by 193 Member States during the 41st session of the Organization’s General Conference. “This Recommendation outlines a common definition, shared values, principles and standards for open science at the international level and proposes a set of actions conducive to a fair and equitable operationalization of open science for all at the individual, institutional, national, regional and international levels.” So what comes next?

From 8 to 10 February 2023 – in the lead-up to the International Day of Women and Girls in Science –, the 3rd Open Science Conference will bring together policy makers, representatives of intergovernmental organizations, researchers, scholars, librarians, publishers and civil society. Under the theme Accelerating the Sustainable Development Goals, Democratizing the Record of Science they will engage in a dialogue about the opportunities and challenges of practicing open science and explore initiatives, themes and perspectives into the open scientific method and the digital scholarly communications cycle….”

It’s Copyright Week 2023: Join Us in the Fight for Better Copyright Law and Policy

“Last year there were a bevy of bad copyright and copyright-related proposals in the U.S. Because thousands of you spoke up, none of them made it into the year-end, must-pass bills in Congress.

But this week isn’t just about stopping bad proposals. It’s about celebrating positive changes for all of us. It’s about right to repair, fair use, and the public domain….”

When XML Marks the Spot: Machine-readable journal articles for discovery and preservation

“If you work with a campus-based journal program and you’re looking to expand the readership and reputation of the articles you publish, adding them to relevant archives and indexes (A&Is) presents a treasure trove of opportunities. A&Is serve as valuable content distribution networks, and inclusion in selective ones is a signal of research quality. You may have heard about XML, one of the primary machine-readable formats academic databases use to ingest content, and wonder if that’s something you need to reach your archiving and indexing goals.

This free webinar, co-hosted by Scholastica, UOregon Libraries, and the GWU Masters in Publishing program, will offer a crash course in the benefits of XML production and use cases, including:

What XML is and the different types required or preferred by academic indexes and archives (with an overview of JATS)
How producing metadata and/or full-text articles in XML can unlock discovery and archiving opportunities with examples
Additional benefits of XML for journal accessibility as well as publishing program and professional development
When XML is needed and when it may not be the best use of journal resources
Ways you can produce XML, including an overview of Scholastica’s production service…”