Multilevel analysis of factors affecting open-access institutional repository implementation in Nigerian universities | Emerald Insight

Abstract:  Purpose

The study aims to identify novel open-access institutional repository (OAIR) implementation barriers and explain how they evolve. It also aims to extend theoretical insights into the information technology (IT) implementation literature.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted the interpretive philosophy, the inductive research approach and qualitative case study research method. Three Nigerian universities served as the case research contexts. The unstructured in-depth interview and the participatory observation were adopted as the data collection instruments. The qualitative data collected were analysed using thematic data analysis technique.

Findings

Findings show that IR implementation barriers evolved from global, organisational and individual implementation levels in the research contexts. Results specifically reveal how easy access to ideas and information and easy movement of people across international boundaries constituted globalisation trend-driven OAIR implementation barriers given their influence on OAIR implementation activities at the organisational and individual implementation levels. The two factors led to overambitious craving for information technology (IT) implementation and inadequate OAIR implementation success factors at the organisational level in the research contexts. They also led to conflicting IR implementation ideas and information at the individual level in the research contexts.

Research limitations/implications

The primary limitation of the research is the adoption of qualitative case study research method which makes its findings not generalisable. The study comprised only three Nigerian universities. However, the study provides plausible insights that explain how OAIR implementation barriers emanate at the organisational and individual levels due to two globalisation trends: easy access to ideas and information and easy movement of people across international boundaries.

Practical implications

The study points out the need for OAIR implementers to assess how easy access to information and ideas and easy movement of people across international boundaries influence the evolution of conflicting OAIR implementation ideas and information at the individual level, and overambitious craving for IT implementation and setting inadequate OAIR implementation success factors at the organisational level. The study extends views in past studies that propose that OAIR implementation barriers only emanate at organisational and individual levels, that is, only within universities involved in OAIR implementation and among individuals working in the universities.

Social implications

The study argues that OAIR implementation consists of three implementation levels: individual, organisational and global. It provides stakeholders with the information that there is a third OAIR implementation level.

Originality/value

Data validity, sample validity and novel findings are the hallmarks of the study’s originality. Study data consist of first-hand experiences and information derived during participatory observation and in-depth interviews with research participants. The participants were purposively selected, given their participation in OAIR implementation in the research contexts. Study findings on the connections among global, organisational and individual OAIR implementation levels and how their relationships lead to OAIR implementation barriers are novel.

Proposal Submission Form – Rethinking Institutional Repositories: Innovations in Management, Collections, and Inclusion

“Proposal Submission Form – Rethinking Institutional Repositories: Innovations in Management, Collections, and Inclusion

Please complete the form below to submit a proposal. If you have any questions, please contact Josh Cromwell (joshua.cromwell@usm.edu)….”

UABC offers an online portal for open science

“In order to make public access to the scientific information, data, and products created at UABC [Autonomous University of Baja California] for the university community and society at large, the Open Science Project was initiated, a virtual space in which Maroon’s work and knowledge focus on scholars.

In this sense, Dr. Juan Guillermo Vaca Rodríguez, Head of the General Coordination of Research and Graduate Studies at UABC, explained that Open Science is a global movement that aims to open research (its methodologies, data, partial and final results and laboratory notes, among other products), from any discipline or field of knowledge.

In this way, the research created in this house of studies can be reused, redistributed, and reproduced by researchers, scientists, students, and anyone who wants to know how the world works and what happens outside of it.

To contribute to this movement, UABC has created the Open Science online portal which contains a search engine where required information can be found by author, title, subject, classification number, ISBN/ISSN, or nomenclature….

One relevant aspect of the portal is the Quality Seal, which will be awarded to internal bodies at UABC that comply with international best practices and standards for open science….”

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences joins Publications Router – Research

“The National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America is now supplying articles from its flagship journal, the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS), to Jisc’s Publications Router service for onward distribution to UK institutional repositories….”

IRUS-US: Institutional Repository Usage Statistics Service

“LYRASIS is partnering with Jisc to form and administer a new IRUS-US community of users. Institutions participating in IRUS-US install the IRUS tracker, allowing Jisc to collects raw download data for all item types and processes those raw data into COUNTER-conformant statistics. Those statistics are aggregated in open access statistical reports, allowing institutions to: share usage information with individual researchers; share usage information with administration; compare usage information with peer institutions; and use usage information to identify national trends.

IRUS-US functions as a small piece of code that is added to IR, enabling a ‘tracker protocol’ that allows Jisc to collect the raw data. Current compatible IR softwares include Dspace, Eprints, Fedora, Figshare, Haplo, Pure portal, Worktribe, Equella and Esploro. Any institution using a software not listed above should contact LYRASIS and indicate their interest, and we will do our best to encourage the software creators to add IRUS tracker functionality into their software capabilities.”

IRUS-US: Institutional Repository Usage Statistics Service

“LYRASIS is partnering with Jisc to form and administer a new IRUS-US community of users. Institutions participating in IRUS-US install the IRUS tracker, allowing Jisc to collects raw download data for all item types and processes those raw data into COUNTER-conformant statistics. Those statistics are aggregated in open access statistical reports, allowing institutions to: share usage information with individual researchers; share usage information with administration; compare usage information with peer institutions; and use usage information to identify national trends.

IRUS-US functions as a small piece of code that is added to IR, enabling a ‘tracker protocol’ that allows Jisc to collect the raw data. Current compatible IR softwares include Dspace, Eprints, Fedora, Figshare, Haplo, Pure portal, Worktribe, Equella and Esploro. Any institution using a software not listed above should contact LYRASIS and indicate their interest, and we will do our best to encourage the software creators to add IRUS tracker functionality into their software capabilities.”

Dryad Data — Repository Analytics and Metrics Portal (RAMP) 2020 data

“The Repository Analytics and Metrics Portal (RAMP) is a web service that aggregates use and performance use data of institutional repositories. The data are a subset of data from RAMP, the Repository Analytics and Metrics Portal (http://rampanalytics.org), consisting of data from all participating repositories for the calendar year 2020. For a description of the data collection, processing, and output methods, please see the “methods” section below….”

Repository Analytics and Metrics Portal – Web analytics for institutional repositories

“The Repository Analytics and Metrics Portal (RAMP) tracks repository items that have surfaced in search engine results pages (SERP) from any Google property. RAMP does this by aggregating Google Search Console (GSC) data from all registered repositories.

RAMP data are collected from GSC in two separate sets: page-click data and country-device data. The page-click data include the handle (aka URL) of every item that appeared in SERP. This dataset creates significant possibilities for additional research if the metadata of those items were mined. RAMP data are as free of robot traffic as possible and they contain no personally identifiable information.

RAMP data include the following metrics:

Impressions – number of times an item appears in SERP
Position – location of the item in SERP
Clicks – number times an item URL is clicked
Click-Through Ratios – number of clicks divided by the number of impressions
Date – date of the search
Device – device used for the search
Country – country from which the search originated….”

Exciting new feature in uO Research coming soon! | Library | University of Ottawa

“uO Research is the University of Ottawa’s open access institutional repository. It offers a global showcase for the digital research and teaching-related material produced by the uOttawa community by making it freely and permanently available on the web.

As of August 24th, 2021, all users will have the option to select a Creative Commons (CC) licence for their work during the submission process to uO Research. A CC licence is a simple and standardized way to grant copyright permissions for creative and academic works; ensure proper attribution; and allow others to copy, distribute, and make use of those works. …”

Medical Institutional Repositories in Libraries (MIRL) | Himmelfarb Health Sciences Library, The George Washington University

“The Medical Institutional Repositories in Libraries (MIRL) Symposium focuses on Institutional Repository (IR) management, curation, and promotion in a health sciences environment. MIRL is a platform-neutral conference. Our goal is to gather together IR practitioners and those with an interest in IRs at hospitals, academic medical centers, and other health settings for discussions and sharing of case studies and best practices for digital archiving of institutional content….”

Call for Proposals | Medical Institutional Repositories in Libraries (MIRL) | Himmelfarb Health Sciences Library, The George Washington University

“The Medical Institutional Repositories in Libraries (MIRL) planning committee is now accepting proposals for the inaugural Medical Institutional Repositories in Libraries (MIRL) Symposium, a free event which will take place virtually on Wednesday, November 17, 2021 (time to be determined). MIRL is a platform-neutral conference and our goal is to gather together IR practitioners and those with an interest in IRs at hospitals, academic medical centers, and other health settings for discussions and sharing of case studies and best practices for digital archiving of institutional content….”

Being transparent & privacy aware: ditching third-party trackers in Strathprints | Open Access @ Strathclyde

 

George Macgregor
Scholarly Publications & Research Data, University of Strathclyde

Over the years, and like a lot of websites, Strathprints has historically made use of third-party integrations. Some of these integrations have provided us, and Strathprints users, with useful functionality over the years. But because these integrations involve the implementation of tracking code within Strathprints, they have also entailed third-party cookies being attached to our users. This is most notable in our use of Google Analytics and AddThis, the former providing analytics on web traffic and the latter providing convenient social sharing buttons and web analytics. In fact, the Google Analytics Tracking Code (GATC) also entails the DoubleClick cookie used to enable remarketing for products like Google Ads, while AddThis engages in browser fingerprinting.

Given the tracking that is increasing occurring within the scholarly publishing industry generally, and the sometimes-nefarious purposes to which the collected data are being put, we feel it is inappropriate for an open repository like Strathprints to continue to use additional and unnecessary forms of tracking. We have therefore recently removed Google Analytics from Strathprints altogether and have implemented alternative social sharing options to replace AddThis. An additional benefit of removing these tools is that Strathprints is serving less Javascript, which helps to promote quicker page loading – so the benefits go beyond superior privacy to include a better user experience!

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Are repositories the key to institutional resilience? | Research Information

“I think it’s fair to say that the purpose of a repository has fundamentally evolved to become a far more encompassing and essential tool for institutions across the world since Covid-19 was declared a global pandemic.

The repository (sometimes referred to as an institutional repository) has expanded in its use and purpose with many more stakeholders realising the additional value it can reward them with, notably by using it for open access to share knowledge and materials and increase collaboration….

The repository has evolved from being predominantly used as a storage solution for research data, to become a hub for learning and collaboration. According to Universities UK Open Access (OA) Coordination Group, institutional repositories are ‘now meeting a broad national need in support of OA and in so doing form an essential component of national research infrastructure.’…”

2021 Medical Institutional Repositories in Libraries (MIRL) Symposium – Proposal Submission Form

“The Medical Institutional Repositories in Libraries (MIRL) planning committee is now accepting proposals for the inaugural Medical Institutional Repositories in Libraries (MIRL) Symposium, which will take place virtually on Wednesday, November 17, 2021 (time to be determined).

The deadline for submitting proposals is September 3, 2021….”