Archiving the COVID Tracking Project – Bay Area Open Science Group – LibCal – UC Berkeley Library

“Are you interested in making your research more openly available? Want to learn about open science tools and platforms that can make your research more effective and reproducible? The Bay Area Open Science Group is intended to bring together students, faculty, and staff from the Stanford, Berkeley, and UCSF communities to learn about open science, discuss the application of open science practices in a research context, and meet other members of the community who are interested in (or already are) incorporating open science practices into their work….

Gather around virtually with colleagues at Stanford and Berkeley for a presentation on The COVID Tracking Project by Kevin Miller, a former team lead with the project who is archiving the project’s data and collections for the UCSF Archives & Special Collections. The project was a volunteer-run, community-science program that became a critical source of national pandemic data accidentally and overnight. He will discuss how it was built, and the challenges of archiving such a massive, born-digital collection….”

Saving Ukrainian Cultural Heritage Online | webinar | May 13, 2022 | San José State University, US

“We invite you to join the SJSU King Library and special guest speakers Anna E. Kijas from Tufts University and Quinn Dombrowski from Stanford University to learn the story behind the grassroots organization Saving Ukrainian Cultural Heritage Online (SUCHO). Time May 13, 2022 12:00 PM in Pacific Time (US and Canada)”

Archives, Access and Artificial Intelligence bei Transcript Publishing

“Digital archives are transforming the Humanities and the Sciences. Digitized collections of newspapers and books have pushed scholars to develop new, data-rich methods. Born-digital archives are now better preserved and managed thanks to the development of open-access and commercial software. Digital Humanities have moved from the fringe to the center of academia. Yet, the path from the appraisal of records to their analysis is far from smooth. This book explores crossovers between various disciplines to improve the discoverability, accessibility, and use of born-digital archives and other cultural assets….

 

Introduction
Seiten 7 – 28

Chapter 1: Artificial Intelligence and Discovering the Digitized Photoarchive
Seiten 29 – 60

Chapter 2: Web Archives and the Problem of Access: Prototyping a Researcher Dashboard for the UK Government Web Archive
Seiten 61 – 82

Chapter 3: Design Thinking, UX and Born-digital Archives: Solving the Problem of Dark Archives Closed to Users
Seiten 83 – 108

Chapter 4: Towards Critically Addressable Data for Digital Library User Studies
Seiten 109 – 130

Chapter 5: Reviewing the Reviewers: Training Neural Networks to Read Peer Review Reports
Seiten 131 – 156

Chapter 6: Supervised and Unsupervised: Approaches to Machine Learning for Textual Entities
Seiten 157 – 178

Chapter 7: Inviting AI into the Archives: The Reception of Handwritten Recognition Technology into Historical Manuscript Transcription
Seiten 179 – 204

AFTERWORD: Towards a new Discipline of Computational Archival Science (CAS)
Seiten 205 – 218 …

[From the Introduction:]

The closure of libraries, archives and museums due to the COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the urgent need to make archives and cultural heritage materials accessible in digital form. Yet too many born-digital and digitized collections remain closed to researchers and other users due to privacy concerns, copyright and other issues. Born-digital archives are rarely accessible to users. For example, the archival emails of the writer Will Self at the British Library are not listed on the Finding Aid describing the collection, and they are not available to users either onsite or offsite. At a time when emails have largely replaced letters, this severely limits the amount of content openly accessible in archival collections. Even when digital data is publicly available (as in the case of web archives), users often need to physically travel to repositories to consult web pages. In the case of digitized collections, copyright can also be a major obstacle to access. For instance, copyrightprotected texts are not available for download from HathiTrust, a not-for-profit collaborative of academic and research libraries preserving 17+ million digitized items (including around 61% not in the public domain)….

It is important to recognize that “dark” archives contain vast amounts of data essential to scholars – including email corres

How the Wayback Machine Is Saving Digital Ukraine – IEEE Spectrum

“When the Ukrainian invasion began, the Internet Archive launched several efforts to capture the Ukrainian Internet. Its archivists launched a high-volume crawl through hundreds of thousands of websites ending in “.ua.” They selected specific sites to archive as completely as possible, including government, education, and library sites. And they targeted journalism, particularly Ukrainian news sites and aggregators. The organization has also been supporting others working to save Ukraine’s digital resources, including SUCHO (Saving Ukrainian Cultural Heritage Online) and the Archive Team.

Mark Graham, director of the Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine, explained this dive into Ukraine’s Internet and how it differs from the Wayback Machine’s usual approach to preserving digital history. …”

Towards Better Sharing of Cultural Heritage — An Agenda for Copyright Reform

“This paper is intended to act as a pillar and reference point for CC’s advocacy work in copyright reform in the cultural heritage context, with a focus on issues arising in the digital environment. It may serve to support members of the CC community in their own advocacy efforts, guide policymakers in their legislative processes, and inform anyone interested in the policy issues gravitating around access and reuse of culture and cultural heritage. It will likely be adapted into a GLAM Guide for Policymakers and will be augmented with real-life examples, case studies and practical advice. It starts with an overview of copyright challenges to the legitimate activities of GLAMs, notably preservation (largely through digitization) and sharing of digital and digitized content images and data for access, use and reuse. It also notes copyright’s chilling effects in the face of the GLAM sector’s general risk aversion. The paper then offers insights towards effective copyright reform addressing those challenges, with a focus on the opportunities related to the digital environment. The proposals for reform aim to create legal certainty and international harmonization as well as to facilitate cross-border transactions. The paper encourages policymakers to recognize and support the pivotal roles of GLAMs in preserving and providing access to knowledge and culture to all members of society. It urges policymakers to engage with stakeholders to ensure there are clear, simple, and effective policies in place to support better sharing of cultural heritage in the public interest. The paper provides a high-level overview of the policy issues and, as a whole, it does not necessarily reflect the current situation in any specific jurisdiction.”

Digital preservation in institutional repositories: a systematic literature review | Emerald Insight

Abstract:  Purpose

This paper aims to carry out a literature review on the implementation of digital preservation policies, strategies and actions by institutional repositories. The objective is to identify, out of the published experiences, at which level they are fulfilling the function of ensuring the long-term availability of the deposited materials.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a systematic literature review methodology, a total of 21 articles from international refereed journals published between 2009 and 2020 are reviewed.

Findings

The research production on this subject is very limited. The scarce number of published articles proves that the interest of repository managers has been focused on issues other than to assure the long-term availability of the assets they store. The literature review has not found clear evidence about how institutional repositories are implementing digital preservation. It is particularly striking the lack of works focused on the situation in European countries. More field studies are needed. They would allow to extract conclusions and produce best practices to help managers to improve preservation strategies.

Originality/value

This study has shown that one of the main functions of repositories is not being dealt with as promised by repository managers. More work in this area is needed. In particular, it is necessary for a study at the European level to gather detailed data that will allow to draw a portrait of the current situation, extract conclusions and produce best practices to help managers to improve or develop preservation strategies.

Wakeling & Abbasi (2022) Why do journals discontinue? A study of Australian ceased journals – Jamali – 2022 – Learned Publishing – Wiley Online Library

Jamali, H.R., Wakeling, S. and Abbasi, A. (2022), Why do journals discontinue? A study of Australian ceased journals. Learned Publishing, 35: 219-228. https://doi.org/10.1002/leap.1448

 

Abstract: Little is known about why journals discontinue despite its significant implications. We present an analysis of 140 Australian journals that ceased from 2011 to mid-2021 and present the results of a survey of editors of 53 of them. The death age of journals was 19.7 (median = 16) with 57% being 10?years or older. About 54% of them belonged to educational institutions and 34% to non-profit organizations. In terms of subject, 75% of the journals belonged to social sciences, humanities and arts. The survey showed that funding was an important reason for discontinuation, and lack of quality submission and lack of support from the owners of the journal also played a role. Too much reliance on voluntary works appeared to be an issue for editorial processes. The dominant metric culture in the research environment and pressure for journals to perform well in journal rankings negatively affect local journals in attracting quality submissions. A fifth of journals indicated that they did not have a plan for the preservation of articles at the time of publication and the current availability of the content of ceased journals appeared to be sub-optimal in many cases with reliance on the website of ceased journals or web-archive platforms.

 

 

Key points

 

One hundred and forty Australian journals ceased publishing between 2011 and 2020, with an average age of 19?years on cessation.
The majority of Australian journals that ceased publication 2011–2020 were in the social sciences, humanities and arts where local journals play an important role.
Funding was found to be a key reason for journal discontinuation followed by lack of support and quality submissions and over-reliance on voluntary work.
Metric driven culture and journal rankings adversely impact local journals and can lead to discontinuation.
Many journals have neither sustainable business models (or funding), nor a preservation plan, both of which jeopardize journal continuation and long-term access to archive content.

 

Preserving Ukraine’s Cultural Heritage Online | Tufts Now

“The effort started in late February, just days after Russia invaded Ukraine, when Kijas mused on Twitter about launching a project to save digitized music collections, her area of expertise. The project soon attracted more than 1,000 volunteers from around the world—librarians, archivists, researchers, and programmers, some of them fluent in Ukrainian—and is now co-organized by Kijas, Quinn Dombrowski of Stanford University, and Sebastian Majstorovic of the Austrian Center for Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage.

The group is crawling websites, digital exhibits, and open access publications of Ukrainian cultural institutions with automated computer programs that search sites and collect data. The group also manually archives pages and files. Volunteers have added more than 10 terabytes of data to servers outside the country and saved almost 15,000 files to the Internet Archive,  where it has a collection. (One terabyte is equal to 1,000 gigabytes, or about the amount of data that could be stored on 16 iPhones.)…”

Job: Community Support Engineer @ Webrecorder

The Community Support Engineer will work to support specific user communities and groups using Webrecorder tools, and serve as a liason between these communities and the rest of the development team.

Webrecorder is urgently looking for a community support engineer to work with the sucho.org community, which is using Browsertrix Crawler, Browsertrix Cloud, ArchiveWeb.page and ReplayWeb.page.

The first priority for the community support engineer will be to support the work happening as part of the SUCHO web archiving effort and gaining a better understanding of fast-spaced state-of-the-art high-fidelity web archiving effort!

The Community Support Engineer will be able to:

Learn how a particular community uses Webrecorder tools
Provide expert support and advice to technical issues around Webrecorder tools
Open issues on GitHub and respond to existing issues, participating in the open-source development process
Response to technical questions on the Webrecorder forum and other community forums (Slack, Discord)
Let community members know when issues are fixed
Become more familiar with Webrecorder tools and how they interoperate
Gain a better understanding of high-fidelity web archiving!
Have an opportunity to contribute to Webrecorder tools development

This role is a great opportunity for a junior developer or someone with technical expertise who is interested in open-source software development.

No web archiving experience is needed!

An ideal candidate will have:

Familiarity with Linux or MacOS command-line
Some experience with Python or Javascript
Great communication skills, especially in communicating technical material in an easy-to-understand way
Some experience or interest in participating in an open source software development community
An interest in learning more about web archiving!

This will be a part-time, contract position at first with possibility of becoming full-time

The estimated compensation for the position will be $6000-$8000 full-time equivalent, with exact compensation depending on time avaiability and previous experience.

Please send inquiries and any questions to: jobs@webrecorder.net

Webrecorder provides an equal opportunity for all. Candidates from backgrounds traditionally underrepresented in technology and open source spaces are especially encouraged to apply.

 

Timbuktu manuscripts: Mali’s ancient documents captured online – BBC News

“A virtual gallery to showcase Mali’s cultural history has been launched, featuring tens of thousands of Timbuktu’s ancient manuscripts….

It is a project the people of Mali have kept their eyes on for many years since Islamist militants set fire to libraries in Timbuktu as they tried to destroy the priceless papers.

Over a period of six months, manuscripts were smuggled out of Timbuktu to Mali’s capital Bamako, as time was running out to rescue and preserve the documents from near destruction….

 

It was the first time that the court in The Hague had tried a case of cultural destruction….

This project to preserve Mali’s manuscripts is not however the first attempt. The University of Cape Town launched the Tombouctou Manuscripts Project in 2003, with an emphasis on “manuscript traditions throughout the African continent”, according to the website.

Similarly, the US Library of Congress has made some of the manuscripts available online.”

Black Press Archives at Howard University Gets Preserved, Digitized Thanks to $2M Grant | The Dig at Howard University

“The Howard University Moorland-Spingarn Research Center (MSRC) received a $2 million grant from the Jonathan Logan Family Foundation to support the preservation and digitization of the Black Press Archives, a newspaper collection of titles by Black journalists, editors and publishers. MSRC worked in partnership with the Center for Journalism and Democracy to secure this critical gift, and the center will be committing additional funds to the project to ensure a significant number of publications in the Black Press Archives are available in an online repository for worldwide research….”

Portico access alert: BMJ Simulation & Technology Enhanced Learning – Portico

“Portico is now providing access to content from the journal BMJ Simulation & Technology Enhanced Learning. This title contributed to research in the use of simulation and innovative technology across the health and social care professions in order to improve clinical outcomes, safety, and patient experiences.

BMJ Simulation & Technology Enhanced Learning ceased publication in July 2021 and is no longer available through the publisher; therefore, it has “triggered” and is now freely available to the community via the Portico archive. While it was originally published as a hybrid journal with some Open Access articles, the publisher has authorized us to make the full journal available on an Open Access basis.”

LOCKSS Community Manager | Stanford University Careers

The LOCKSS Program makes the award-winning LOCKSS distributed digital preservation software platform, used worldwide by hundreds of libraries in dozens of countries to preserve and provide authoritative access to digital content, including scholarly communications, Web archives, and institutional repositories. It also operates digital preservation networks like the Global LOCKSS Network (GLN), delivers digital preservation services to organizations like the CLOCKSS Archive, and supports other digital preservation initiatives, all powered by the LOCKSS software. It is an internationally recognized part of the Stanford University Libraries (SUL) portfolio, having a major programmatic impact on the operations of memory organizations globally.

Position summary:

The LOCKSS Program seeks a Community Manager to foster partnerships and serve as a thought leader in the digital preservation sphere. You will become a familiar external face in three of the LOCKSS Program’s key constituencies: libraries and memory organizations, scholarly publishers and content providers, and open source software developers. You will play a pivotal role in facilitating business and technical conversations between LOCKSS Program staff and existing or prospective stakeholders, to apply LOCKSS technologies toward establishing new digital preservation initiatives. Are you a creative communicator, enthusiastic about digital preservation and passionate about access to information? Join our dedicated team and help the scholarly community meet its digital preservation needs with the LOCKSS Program.

In this role, you will:

 

Pursue partnerships with libraries and publishers, but also state and national agencies, scholarly content providers, and other memory institutions, to form digital preservation initiatives using LOCKSS technologies.
Ensure continuity of institutional and interpersonal contact with existing and prospective partners.
Organize community outreach events to promote the LOCKSS Program and foster engagement, such as webinars, trainings and unconferences.
Develop informational and instructional materials for the LOCKSS Program’s Web site and documentation portal, and to aid in conducting technical and business conversations with partners.
Track, participate and help advance long term digital preservation both individually and through organizing and applying technical and community efforts

 

To be successful in this role, you will bring:

Bachelor’s degree and five years relevant experience, or a combination of education and relevant experience.
Experience in the areas of digital preservation, Web archiving, or digital libraries.
Excellent communication skills, both written and verbal, including the ability to bridge functional and technical resources by communicating effectively with individuals of varying systems expertise and business needs.
Knowledge of principles and techniques used in conducting management studies and in systems analysis.
Skill in conducting interviews and facilitating group meetings.
Skill in developing and conducting training programs.

In addition, preferred requirements include:

Experience with managing products or programs.
Demonstrated ability to manage multiple projects simultaneously.
Knowledge of various marketing elements (e.g. pricing, audience, channels, communication).
Demonstrated ability to understand the target audience life cycle and ability to convert leads into new business.
Excellent written and oral communication skills.

Why Stanford is for you:

Stanford University has revolutionized the way we live and enrich the world. Supporting this mission is our diverse and dedicated 17,000 staff. We seek talent driven to impact the future of our legacy. Our culture and unique perks empower you with:

Freedom to grow. We offer career development programs, tuition reimbursement, or audit a course. Join a TedTalk, film screening, or listen to a renowned author or global leader speak.
A caring culture. We provide superb retirement plans, generous time-off, and family care resources.
A healthier you. Climb our rock wall, or choose from hundreds of health or fitness classes at our world-class exercise facilities. We also provide excellent health care benefits.
Discovery and fun. Stroll through historic sculptures, trails, and museums.
Enviable resources. Enjoy free commuter programs, ridesharing incentives, discounts and more.

LOCKSS Operations Manager | Stanford University Careers

This position is posted at level 2 and 3.

 

School/unit description:

 

The LOCKSS Program makes the award-winning LOCKSS distributed digital preservation software platform, used worldwide by libraries to preserve and provide authoritative access to digital content, including scholarly communications, Web archives, and institutional repositories. It also operates digital preservation networks like the Global LOCKSS Network (GLN), delivers digital preservation services to organizations like the CLOCKSS Archive, and supports other digital preservation initiatives, all powered by the LOCKSS software. It is an internationally recognized part of the Stanford University Libraries (SUL) portfolio, having a major programmatic impact on the operations of memory organizations globally.

 

Position summary:

 

The LOCKSS Program seeks an Operations Manager to oversee delivery of digital preservation services in the Global LOCKSS Network (GLN), CLOCKSS Archive, and other LOCKSS-based digital preservation networks. You will be responsible for the LOCKSS Program’s portfolio of content processing pipelines, coordinating tasks incumbent on the LOCKSS Applied Preservation Services (APS) team, communicating with publishers and publishing platforms, and reporting to the LOCKSS Program Manager as well as CLOCKSS Archive leadership. Are you organized, an excellent communicator, and passionate about digital preservation and access to information? Join our dedicated team and become the LOCKSS Program’s familiar face among the scholarly publishers and publishing platforms who are the LOCKSS Program’s partners.

 

In this role, you will:

 

Develop a thorough understanding of LOCKSS content processing operations, to run them with efficiency and provide excellent digital preservation services to the LOCKSS Program’s partners.
Serve as a responsive technical point of contact for inquiries from publishers, the CLOCKSS Archive, and other stakeholders in the GLN and other digital preservation networks.
Collaborate with the LOCKSS team and partners to determine deliverables, create project plans, track current and pending processing and development work, and drive it to completion.
Translate partner business needs into actionable internal tasks, and conversely, translate internal business needs into actionable partner requirements.
Identify and champion opportunities for process improvement through workflow adjustments and technical investment.

To be successful in this role, you will bring:

 

Bachelor’s degree and eight years relevant experience, or a combination of education and relevant experience.
Experience in the areas of digital preservation, Web archiving, or digital libraries, or demonstrated ability to pick up skills in areas like these quickly.
Excellent communication skills, both written and verbal, including the ability to bridge functional and technical resources by communicating effectively with individuals of varying systems expertise and business needs.

 

In addition, preferred requirements include:

 

Experience with project management and typical support ticketing and task management and tracking systems.
Familiarity with scholarly communications, content publishing platforms, bibliographic metadata formats, and/or digital repository systems.