South African Government places DOAJ on list of accredited journals – DOAJ News Service

“DOAJ (Directory of Open Access Journals) is pleased to announce its inclusion in the recognised list of journals, lists and indexes accepted by the South African Department of Higher Education and Training. The move represents the first time that an open access listing has been recommended to South African University academics, encouraging researchers to publish in open access and make use of the free quality content available on DOAJ….

Articles published in DOAJ journals by South African scholars, will receive publishing points. Only articles published in approved scholarly journals can be subsidised by the Department of Higher Education and Training. …”

The Big Ten Academic Alliance Announces Collective Action Agreement with DOAJ

“The Big Ten Academic Alliance (BTAA) and the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) have announced a three-year collective action agreement that provides multi-year support for DOAJ from all fifteen member libraries. DOAJ indexes and promotes quality, peer-reviewed open access journals from around the world, providing a community-driven service to play an essential role in the creation of a sustainable model for the future of scholarly publishing….”

Strategy 2021 to 2022 – DOAJ News Service

“Strategic objectives

Secure a sustainable funding model
With a focus on a sustaining support model.

Improve DOAJ’s value and place in the discovery chain
Develop strategic relationships with discovery services, integrate features and services that enhance DOAJ’s position, and improve coverage.

Communicate the value of DOAJ and raise our profile
Implement a Communications strategy, use multiple languages and focus on integrating the DOAJ database in national accreditation programmes.

Continue to focus on our key activity of reviewing applications and journals
Make our key services even faster and even more efficient, and increase the diversity of our coverage….”

Why did we stop collecting and showing the open access start date for journals? – DOAJ News Service

“When we released our new website and application form, people were quick to notice that some elements of information were no longer being collected or displayed. These elements all relate to questions which we removed from the application form, details of which were published in March 2020.

Of all the questions removed, emails to our Helpdesk show that the most missed is the open access start date or, to be more accurate: ‘What was the first calendar year in which a complete volume of the journal provided online Open Access content to the Full Text of all articles?’ People are wondering why we no longer collect and display that information. …

Over time, it has become harder to find the right answer to that seemingly simple question: when did open access start for this journal? Finding the true date could be time-consuming. And what is the correct date to use? …”

Full article: Open Access Initiatives in Western Asia

Abstract:  This paper highlights open access activities and resources from Western Asia. The development of open access journals from this region is analyzed through regional listings in the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), and information about the development and implementation of open access repositories is taken from the Directory of Open Access Repositories (OpenDOAR) platform. Additional information about OA resources and development projects was found through UNESCO’s Global Open Access Portal. The study’s findings show that, even with support from international groups like EIFL and OpenAIRE, the region’s open access market lags behind that of more developed countries. Turkey and the United Arab Emirates (UAE) stand out among Western Asian states, and Cyprus took the important step of instituting a national public open access policy. Awareness projects and workshops will be a vital step in helping the countries of Western Asia to see the value of open access and to build a stronger OA infrastructure.

 

How to update the information that we have about your journal – DOAJ News Service

“When Plan S’ Journal Checker Tool (JCT) launches, some publishers might want to make sure that their journals’ entries in DOAJ include the most up-to-date information and, if not, submit updates to us. If you think that Plan S affects your journals, then here is how to submit an update.

For publishers with twenty or more journals in DOAJ

Over the next few days, we will email a CSV file to you. This file will contain a copy of your journal records, as they are in DOAJ today. You must check each field in the file and make updates where appropriate. For its first iteration, the JCT is using DOAJ to check for licensing information so you should check that the licensing information is correct, at the very least.

Once we receive the file back from you, we will check it against your journals’ websites, correct it if necessary and then load it into the database. The live journals records will be updated immediately….”

CLOCKSS is Collaborating to Improve the Preservation of Open Access Journals – CLOCKSS

“DOAJ, CLOCKSS Archive, Internet Archive, Keepers Registry/ISSN International Centre and Public Knowledge Project (PKP) have agreed to partner to provide an alternative pathway for the preservation of small-scale, APC-free, Open Access journals.

The recent study authored by M.Laakso, L.Matthias, and N.Jahn has revived academia’s concern over the disappearance of the scholarly record disseminated in Open Access (OA) journals.

Their research focuses on OA journals as at risk of vanishing, and “especially small-scale and APC-free journals […] with limited financial resources” that often “opt for lightweight technical solutions” and “cannot afford to enroll in preservation schemes.” The authors have used data available in the Directory of Open Access Journals to come up with the conclusion that just under half of the journals indexed in DOAJ participate in preservation schemes. Their findings “suggest that current approaches to digital preservation are successful in archiving content from larger journals and established publishing houses but leave behind those that are more at risk.” They call for new preservation initiatives “to develop alternative pathways […] better suited for smaller journals that operate without the support of large, professional publishers.” …”

Extending the reach and discovery of Quality OA journals through world-wide community engagement in their curation – Charleston Hub

“The mission of the Directory of Open Access Journals is “to increase the visibility, accessibility, reputation, usage and impact of quality, peer-reviewed, open access scholarly research journals globally, regardless of discipline, geography or language. [www.doaj.org/about#aimscope].” To achieve an important part of that mission DOAJ engages more than 20 “DOAJ Ambassadors” and almost one hundred volunteer editors carefully chosen from researchers, educators, and librarians around the world. This session will describe how this process of selecting and managing these volunteers is carried out at DOAJ. Attendees will learn what criteria are applied to accept peer-reviewed Open Access journals into DOAJ, as well as the additional criteria by which a journal can obtain the “DOAJ Seal.” Since alignment with the interests of libraries and universities is one of the core principles for DOAJ, seeing how DOAJ reaches out, recruits, and manages volunteers from the academic community reveals one of the ways in which alignment of DOAJ with the interests of libraries is carried out in practice….”

Extending the reach and discovery of Quality OA journals through world-wide community engagement in their curation – Charleston Hub

“The mission of the Directory of Open Access Journals is “to increase the visibility, accessibility, reputation, usage and impact of quality, peer-reviewed, open access scholarly research journals globally, regardless of discipline, geography or language. [www.doaj.org/about#aimscope].” To achieve an important part of that mission DOAJ engages more than 20 “DOAJ Ambassadors” and almost one hundred volunteer editors carefully chosen from researchers, educators, and librarians around the world. This session will describe how this process of selecting and managing these volunteers is carried out at DOAJ. Attendees will learn what criteria are applied to accept peer-reviewed Open Access journals into DOAJ, as well as the additional criteria by which a journal can obtain the “DOAJ Seal.” Since alignment with the interests of libraries and universities is one of the core principles for DOAJ, seeing how DOAJ reaches out, recruits, and manages volunteers from the academic community reveals one of the ways in which alignment of DOAJ with the interests of libraries is carried out in practice….”

SCOSS meets major milestones: DOAJ reaches funding goal – SCOSS – The Global Sustainability Coalition for Open Science Services

“SCOSS has met a major milestone. The Directory of Open Access Journals, one of two Open infrastructure services recommended during our pilot funding cycle, has met its funding goal of 1,370 000 Euros. The drive kicked off in late 2018; over the course of the past two years, more than 216 institutions from 19 countries contributed to DOAJ….”

SCOSS meets major milestones: DOAJ reaches funding goal – SCOSS – The Global Sustainability Coalition for Open Science Services

“SCOSS has met a major milestone. The Directory of Open Access Journals, one of two Open infrastructure services recommended during our pilot funding cycle, has met its funding goal of 1,370 000 Euros. The drive kicked off in late 2018; over the course of the past two years, more than 216 institutions from 19 countries contributed to DOAJ….”

Designing for better accessibility in open access scholarly publishing – DOAJ News Service

“Accessibility has always been a top priority in doaj.org’s redesign project, along with improving:

user experience,
navigation, and
responsiveness on various devices, browsers, and operating systems.

We approached the project with the idea that accessibility, as opposed to branding and visual design, is foundational to all of these elements….”

Comment on “Open is not forever: a study of vanished open access journals”

Abstract:  We comment on a recent article by Laakso et al. (arXiv:2008.11933 [cs.DL]), in which the disappearance of 176 open access journals from the Internet is noted. We argue that one reason these journals may have vanished is that they were predatory journals. The de-listing of predators from the Directory of Open Access Journals in 2014 and the abundance of predatory journals and awareness thereof in North America parsimoniously explain the temporal and geographic patterns Laakso et al. observed.