Authors Alliance Applauds Today’s Decision in Access Copyright v. York University | Authors Alliance

“This morning, the Supreme Court of Canada issued a unanimous opinion in Access Copyright v. York University, finding that mandatory tariffs for works in a collective copyright society’s collection were not enforceable against a user that chose not to be bound, and suggesting that the lower courts had applied an unduly narrow interpretation of fair dealing. Authors Alliance applauds this decision, the last to be authored by renowned Justice Rosalie Abella before her retirement from the bench.

The case involved a claim by Access Copyright, a Canadian copyright collective, which sought to have York University comply with an interim tariff approved by the Copyright Board of Canada for works in Access Copyright’s collection. In response, York University brought a counterclaim seeking a declaration that its guidelines for copying materials for education purposes constituted “fair dealing” under the Copyright Act of Canada. The case raised the question of whether copyright collectives can force users to license content from them, even if the users prefer to comply with their copyright obligations in other ways.

Authors Alliance, together with Professor Ariel Katz, intervened in the case, submitting a factum to the Court and participating in oral arguments. On the issue of whether the approved tariffs are mandatory vis-à-vis users, we supported the Federal Court of Appeal’s finding that the approved tariffs bind copyright collectives but cannot be imposed on users as mandatory tariffs. On the issue of fair dealing, we argued that in the absence of specific allegations of copyright infringement from copyright owners, the lower courts should not have dealt with the issues of infringement and fair dealing. In addition, we urged the court to consider that Access Copyright does not represent the interests of all authors, and especially not the authors whose primary concern is their works having the greatest possible reach and impact….”

The burden of article processing charges on Canadian universities

Abstract:  The question about the cost of access to scholarly resources is usually answered by focusing on subscription cost. This study highlights the article processing charges (APCs) paid by Canada’s research institution as an additional scholarly resource. Unpaywall database was queried with the DOIs of CARL member universities’ publication indexed in the Web of Science. We find that while Open Access should in principle reduce the cost of access to scholarly literature, we are rather in a situation where both the cost of access and the cost of publishing are increasing simultaneously.

ARL/CARL Joint Task Force on Research Data Services: Final Report

“The task force formed three working groups of data practitioners, representing a wealth of expertise, to research the institutional landscape and policy environment in both the US and Canada, setting three core objectives for the work: 1. Develop a shared understanding among ARL and CARL members of the roles of research libraries in the research data ecosystem 2. Develop a roadmap with recommendations for the roles of research libraries with regard to research data principles, policies, and approaches to managing research data in the context of the Open Science by Design framework and recommendations 3. Develop guidance for research libraries and for representing research libraries’ work with policy makers, including strategies for discipline-specific research data approaches, priorities for automation of processes, economic models to scale and sustain shared resources, prioritization of research data to steward, and decision-making rubrics….”

ARL/CARL Joint Task Force on Research Data Services Releases Final Report – Association of Research Libraries

“The Association of Research Libraries (ARL)/Canadian Association of Research Libraries (CARL) Joint Task Force on Research Data Services has released its final report. The task force formed in 2020 with a two-fold purpose: (1) to demonstrate and commit to the roles research libraries have in stewarding research data and as part of institution-wide research support services and (2) to guide the development of resources for the ARL and CARL memberships in advancing their organizations as collaborative partners with respect to research data services in the context of FAIR (findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable) data principles and the US National Academies’ Open Science by Design framework. Research libraries will be successful in meeting these objectives if they act collectively and are deeply engaged with disciplinary communities. The task force formed three working groups of data practitioners, representing a wealth of expertise, to research the institutional landscape and policy environment in both the US and Canada.

The final report presents the task force’s recommendations for the roles of research libraries with regard to research data principles, policies, and approaches to managing research data. The report also offers strategies for discipline-specific research data approaches, priorities for automation of processes, economic models to scale and sustain shared resources, prioritization of research data to steward, and decision-making rubrics.”

Érudit joins ORCID-CA | Canadian Research Knowledge Network

“CRKN and the ORCID-CA Consortium are pleased to welcome Érudit to ORCID-CA. By becoming a member of ORCID-CA, Érudit aims to promote the use of ORCID identifiers among its community and integrate the ORCID unique and persistent identifier registry into its platform. The Érudit.org platform is now the main access point for research in the humanities and social sciences in Canada. Its collections, mostly open access, are consulted worldwide by both academic researchers and the general public….”

Supporting open access research: three new agreements | Library | University of Waterloo

“The Library has signed three new agreements to cover article processing charges (APCs) for open access (OA) articles published by Waterloo researchers between January 1, 2021 and December 31, 2023 with Sage, PLOS Medicine and Biology, and Cogitatio Press.

Here is what this means for Waterloo researchers:

Sage

APCs are covered by the Library when you publish open access in over 900 Sage Choice journals
There is also a 40% discount on APCs on over 130 Sage Gold Open Access Journals (these journals are fully OA)

PLOS Medicine and Biology

APCs are covered by the Library when you publish in PLOS Medicine or PLOS Biology

Cogitatio Press

APCs are covered by the Library when you publish in any Cogitatio Press Journal …”

How the Centre for Journalology hopes to fix science

“Still, Moher acknowledges that the center has not fully engaged with policy makers—the research funders, journal editors, and institutional leaders who have the power to change norms. He cites the need to gather evidence before suggesting any changes to the status quo. “We have the evidence in lots of areas now, and I think what we need to do is actually try to work much closer with policy people now,” he says. Part of that effort involves putting together an open-science dashboard to help institutions keep track of their own accomplishments and shortcomings in how accessible their research is.

The center is also building collaborations with institutions to help them implement open-science practices. An example, Moher says, is the Montreal Neurological Institute, where the Centre for Journalology is auditing data-sharing practices and introducing an educational program to make data sharing the norm. If that effort is successful, “we’ll slowly start to introduce other open-science practices,” he says….”

 

Newly revised Open Access Commitment by librarians and archivists – University Library – University of Saskatchewan

“Open access enables anyone to read and make use of research products at no cost and with limited copyright restrictions. This makes access to research results more equitable and allows us as authors and researchers to reach a wider audience.

We adopted the first commitment to making our research publications as openly available as possible more than ten years ago in 2010. Much has changed since then! We have rebranded our institutional repository as HARVEST and opened it up for all USask researchers to self-archive their own publications OA for free; we have become more aware of the importance of making more products of our research (such as protocols and research data) openly available as well; and we now more clearly acknowledge our professional role in advocating for a more sustainable publishing system. These are several of the revisions that we approved in our  new Open Access Commitment. There is also an acknowledgement that not all research products are appropriate to be shared openly for cultural, privacy, or ethical reasons.

USask librarians and archivists are not alone in adopting such statements. The Open Scholarship Policy Observatory at the University of Victoria tracks Canadian University Open Access Statements. Currently there are 14 university-level statements and 12 department or college-level statements, most of which are from libraries like ours!

To learn more about open access, please visit our guide.”

Webinar: How Can We Successfully Collaborate to Advance National Capacity for OER in Canada? – YouTube

“In this webinar, held April 22, 2021, panelists discuss strategies and opportunities for advancing Canada’s national OER capacity, whether through funding, training, infrastructure, or advocacy. SPARC’s experience with obtaining funding commitments at the federal level and with a variety of state-level policy strategies in the US is also be presented to help inform the discussion.”

How Can We Successfully Collaborate to Advance National Capacity for OER in Canada?

“So how can we strengthen OER adoption further, better ensuring that all post-secondary students have opportunities to benefit from regionally relevant OER, and that faculty and instructors who wish to incorporate open education in their teaching have the supports and incentives to allow them to do so?…”

Open Access Agreements with PLOS Biology and SAGE means no Article Processing Charges (APCs) for McMaster Authors | McMaster University Library

“The University Library is pleased to announce that McMaster has signed open access publishing agreements with PLOS Biology and SAGE through the Canadian Research Knowledge Network (CRKN).  As of January 1, 2021, McMaster authors do not have to pay Article Processing Charges to cover the cost of open access publishing in PLOS Biology or in over 900 SAGE Choice journals….”

New Open Access Agreements for Western’s Researchers

“Good news! Researchers at Western who want to make their work open access can now benefit from new agreements with three major publishers that offer new discounts and waivers for open access journal Article Processing Charges (APCs). These agreements with SAGE, PLOS, and Elsevier were negotiated by the Canadian Research Knowledge Network (CRKN) on behalf of researchers at CRKN member institutions.

The agreement with SAGE means that Western-affiliated authors who publish in over 900 SAGE journals will have their work made openly available to the public without paying APCs. This applies to all SAGE journals that operate on the hybrid subscription/OA model (some exceptions apply). There is also a 40% discount on APCs for journals published on the gold OA model (entirely funded by APCs)….”

Punctum Books Library Program Partners with Lyrasis for the US & Canada · punctum books

“As the Punctum Books Supporting Library Membership Program, launched in collaboration with the University of California Santa Barbara as a network of collective support for open access book publishing, has entered its second year, we are proud to announce that punctum books has partnered with LYRASIS to broaden our reach among US and Canadian academic libraries.

LYRASIS, a not-for-profit membership organization of more than 1,000 libraries, museums, and archives supports enduring access to our shared academic, scientific, and cultural heritage through leadership in open technologies, content services, digital solutions, and collaboration with archives, libraries, museums, and knowledge communities worldwide.

Our partnership with LYRASIS will complement our partnership with Jisc in the UK, which already has seen several UK-based academic libraries sign up to support punctum in its mission to publish open-access books that push the boundaries of scholarship….”

CRKN Meets Bold Negotiation Objectives in Elsevier Renewal | Canadian Research Knowledge Network

“Members of the Canadian Research Knowledge Network (CRKN) set bold negotiation objectives for the 2020 renewal with Elsevier: significantly reduce costs, increase open access, and ensure transparency of the agreement. After eleven months of negotiating, CRKN’s Content Strategy Committee (CSC) is announcing a renewal of the Elsevier ScienceDirect license, which includes:

A 12.5% reduction for 2021, followed by a 0% change for 2022, and a 2% increase for 2023. The renewed agreement maintains access to all journals in the Freedom Collection, including former Academic Press journals, and members’ subscribed titles, with no loss of perpetual access rights. This results in cost savings of US$17.4 million over three years (when compared with a three-year contract with anticipated 2% annual increases).
A 20% discount on Article Processing Charges (APCs) for both hybrid and gold open access journals. Cell Press, Lancet, and some other society-owned journals are excluded.
No confidentiality or non-disclosure clause which ensures transparency and allows the terms to be shared….”