Open Access Librarian

“The Emory University Libraries seek an Open Access Librarian to contribute to our growing scholarly communications program and to further our commitment to open access (OA) and open educational practices (OEPs). The ideal candidate will be someone who is interested in helping us develop innovative approaches to OA and OEP outreach, promotion, and education; who shares the Libraries’ commitment to social justice; who is committed to student and faculty success; and who is able to work successfully in a collaborative environment….”

Opposing the Merger Between Clarivate PLC and ProQuest LLC

“The proposed merger between Clarivate and ProQuest is likely to produce adverse competitive effects described in the Horizontal Merger Guidelines and result in foreseeable harm to consumers related to product quality, price, choice, and privacy. The merger would significantly decrease competition across key markets, resulting in a research enterprise increasingly dominated by a very small number of firms with extraordinary market power, relative to both their competitors and customers. Blocking this merger is a necessary step in pulling the research enterprise back from the brink of a future in which it is controlled by platform monopolies.”

Proudly Serving: Default to open – Google Docs

Overview

Openness is a mindset and culture. It creates opportunities for exponential government innovation. By embracing the values of collaboration, participation and transparency, government can instill trust and foster better and faster solutions to small and big problems.

The problem

Governments that isolate processes and decision-making from the public limit the opportunity to truly create government with, for and by the people. By taking an insular approach to service, we don’t leverage the collective wisdom and energy of the public. The opaqueness leads to ambivalence and mistrust.

The solution

A government culture of ‘open by default’ that publicly shares its information and processes and actively solicits feedback. By creating mechanisms that encourage the public to engage early and often, we develop opportunities for increased engagement in the context of trust and a sense of betterment for the entire community….”

Will There Be Libraries in 25 Years?  | Time

“But just as the Web increased people’s access to information exponentially, an opposite trend has evolved. Global media corporations—emboldened by the expansive copyright laws they helped craft and the emerging technology that reaches right into our reading devices—are exerting absolute control over digital information. These two conflicting forces—towards unfettered availability and completely walled access to information—have defined the last 25 years of the Internet. How we handle this ongoing clash will define our civic discourse in the next 25 years. If we fail to forge the right path, publishers’ business models could eliminate one of the great tools for democratizing society: our independent libraries.

These are not small mom-and-pop publishers: a handful of publishers dominate all books sales and distribution including trade books, ebooks, and text books. Right now, these corporate publishers are squeezing libraries in ways that may render it impossible for any library to own digital texts in five years, let alone 25. Soon, librarians will be reduced to customer service reps for a Netflix-like rental catalog of bestsellers. If that comes to pass, you might as well replace your library card with a credit card. That’s what these billion-dollar-publishers are pushing.

 

The libraries I grew up with would buy books, preserve them, and lend them for free to their patrons. If my library did not have a particular book, then it would borrow a copy from another library for me. In the shift from print to digital, many commercial publishers are declaring each of these activities illegal: they refuse libraries the right to buy ebooks, preserve ebooks, or lend ebooks. They demand that libraries license ebooks for a limited time or for limited uses at exorbitant prices, and some publishers refuse to license audiobooks or ebooks to libraries at all, making those digital works unavailable to hundreds of millions of library patrons….”

Preprints: Accelerating Research

“What are preprints, and how are they changing how biomedical research results are shared? Should you use information from preprints? Should you share your own research results in a preprint? This course from the National Library of Medicine® explains the basics of preprints, and explores the benefits and considerations of using and submitting preprints….”

Transform to Open Science (TOPS) | Science Mission Directorate

“From 2022 to 2027, TOPS will accelerate the engagement of the scientific community in open science practices through events and activities aimed at:

Lowering barriers to entry for historically excluded communities
Better understanding how people use NASA data and code to take advantage of our big data collections
Increasing opportunities for collaboration while promoting scientific innovation, transparency, and reproducibility….”

US Senate Finance Committee Presses Publishers on Library Ebook Contracts

“Earlier this year, Fight for the Future — a group of technology experts, policy makers, and creatives — launched a tool called Who Can Get Your Book, meant to highlight the challenges of accessibility and availability of ebooks in public schools and libraries, rural areas, and other communities where these disparities create burdens to information. It is but one organization seeking transparency around ebooks from publishers, and now, the US Senate Finance Committee is pushing for more.

Finance Committee Chair Ron Wyden (D., Oregon) and U.S. Representative Anna G. Eshoo (D., California) lead the latest charge, drafting a series of letters to the Big Five publishers to clarify their ebook contracts with public schools.

Ebook contracts are notoriously tricky. For libraries, who can purchase print books and own them through their natural lifespan, ebooks come with restrictions on a number of fronts. They aren’t owned by the library and instead are licensed: at any time, the books may disappear or come with circulation limits, and those licenses come at astronomical prices. In cases where licenses can be negotiated with better terms for the library, costs only grow….”

Prospective Clinical Trial Registration: A Prerequisite for Publishing Your Results | Radiology

“The ICMJE requires that clinical trial results be published in the same clinical trial depository where the trial is registered. These results are in the form of a short (?500 words) abstract or table (6,7). Full disclosure of the existing results publication in a clinical trial registry should be explicitly stated when the manuscript is submitted for publication. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has indicated it will enforce trial results reporting related to ClinicalTrials.gov (8). The FDA is authorized to seek civil monetary penalties from responsible parties, including additional civil monetary penalties. In the United States, the sponsor of an applicable clinical trial is considered the responsible party, unless or until the sponsor designates a qualified principal investigator as the responsible party. The FDA issued its first Notice of Noncompliance in April 2021 for failure to report results in ClinicalTrials.gov based on a lack of reporting the safety and effectiveness results for the drug dalantercept in combination with axitinib in patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma (8).

Finally, as of July 1, 2018, manuscripts submitted to ICMJE journals that report the results of clinical trials must contain a data sharing statement. Clinical trials that begin enrolling participants on or after January 1, 2019, must include a data sharing plan in the trial registration. (for further information, see www.icmje.org/recommendations/browse/publishing-and-editorial-issues/clinical-trial-registration.html). Since most clinical trials take 2 or more years for results to be reported, the Radiology editorial board had expected such mandatory data sharing plans to be reported in the current year. However, because of the COVID-19 pandemic, many clinical trials were halted. Thus, journal publication requirements to include data sharing statements are more likely to impact authors beginning in 2023. Data sharing statements required for Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) journals may be found at https://pubs.rsna.org/page/policies#clinical.

In conclusion, prospective clinical trial registration is a mechanism allowing us to ensure transparency in clinical research conduct, honest and complete reporting of the clinical trial results, and minimization of selective result publications. Since its inception in 2004, this requirement has evolved into a policy that is practiced by major medical journals worldwide, is mandatory for publication of trial results, and, in some circumstances, is enforced by the FDA. Further, ICMJE journals, including RSNA journals, are expecting manuscripts that report trial results to include statements on data sharing. As each clinical trial design is unique, we encourage authors to refer to the full description of the current ICMJE policy at icmje.org for additional information pertaining to their specific circumstances.”

Hill Museum & Manuscript Library (HMML) Creates New Database to Assist Scholars of Understudied Manuscript Traditions

“The Hill Museum & Manuscript Library (HMML) at Saint John’s University has developed a new database to support and enhance the study of understudied manuscript traditions. Created as part a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), HMML Authority File is an open-access database which establishes accurate and consistent data (“authorities”) for the names of persons, places, works, organizations, and families related to the manuscripts and artwork in HMML Reading Room and HMML Museum, which provide free access to the collections of more than 800 libraries worldwide.”

University of Georgia Press Launches the Georgia Open History Library | UGA Libraries

“The University of Georgia Press is pleased to announce the launch of the Georgia Open History Library on Oct. 15, 2021. The Georgia Open History Library (GOHL) is an open-access library of nearly fifty digital editions of single-authored scholarly titles and two multivolume series, as well as primary documents going back to the founding of Georgia as a colony up to statehood and beyond.

 

GOHL includes studies of Adams and Jefferson; the American Revolution in Georgia; the Creek Nation; the papers of Revolutionary War general Lachlan McIntosh and the colony’s visionary founder James Edward Oglethorpe; and records of the German-speaking Protestant Salzburger settlement. The titles also focus on how Georgia navigated its relationship with Indigenous peoples, other colonies, international diplomacy, as well as its place in a new nation.

 

Selected by a statewide advisory board of Georgia historians, the volumes in the GOHL constitute the most fulsome portrait of early Georgia and its inhabitants—European, Indigenous, and diasporic African—available from primary sources. Of particular importance are the colonial records of the state of Georgia and what are widely regarded as the essential supplements to those records: the journals and/or letters of the Earl of Egmont, Peter Gordon, and Henry Newton, as well as the two publications of General James Edward Oglethorpe’s own writings. The Press commissioned new forewords written by contemporary historians that add important current scholarly context to each volume….”

Milner Library recognizes Open Access Week, October 25-31 | Illinois State University, US

“Join Milner Library for a series of events and workshops to explore sharing knowledge during Open Access Week 2021. Open Access Week is an international recognition week that highlights the benefits of making information free, online, and open for all to use. This important observance gives campus the opportunity to learn, share, help, and transform the way research is conducted. This year, Open Access Week takes place October 25-31. The 2021 theme is “It Matters How We Open Knowledge: Building Structural Equity.” Throughout the week Milner Library will highlight the importance of open access materials, information, and issues….”

UC San Diego Library | Celebrating International Open Access Week 2021

““It Matters How We Open Knowledge: Building Structural Equity.” Textbook and course material affordability continues to be an obstacle to many students’ academic success. Open access initiatives encourage equitable distribution of academic research to ensure all students – regardless of their financial background – can access this research.  International Open Access Week (October 25-31, 2021), aims to highlight the inequities of access to academic resources and coordinate actionable solutions to combat this issue. The UC San Diego Library is delighted to offer the following events for Open Access Week 2021:

How to Get Started Publishing as an Undergraduate, Wednesday, October 27, 2021…

Open Access Publishing: Opportunities for UC San Diego Authors, Wednesday, November 3, 2021…”

Developing scholarly communication competencies: How a post-master’s degree residency program can provide career preparation | Tavernier | College & Research Libraries News

Developing scholarly communication competencies: How a post-master’s degree residency program can provide career preparation

by Willa Tavernier

Vol 82, No 4 (2021) April

“…During the final semester of my MLIS, IU-Bloomington advertised its inaugural diversity residency for an open scholarship librarian—the position which I now hold. This three-year residency based in the Scholarly Communication Department, is collaboratively funded by the library and the university. Over the first two years of my residency, I have developed competency in institutional repository management and publishing services, assessment and impact metrics, and outreach and instruction. A high level of institutional support, the length of the residency, and the agency I had in developing projects, together with substantial professional development funding and mentorship, were key contributors to developing these competencies….”

Library to host Open Access Week 2021 | Oct. 25, Nov. 2 | University of California, Riverside Library

“The University of California, Riverside Library will host Open Access Week 2021, as part of the global event called International Open Access Week. “It Matters How We Open Knowledge: Building Structural Equity” is the 2021 theme. The event series will kick off on Monday, Oct. 25, with three workshops for the 2021 event.

Data Publishing Made Easy with Dryad: Oct. 25 at 11 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Copyright for Graduate Students and Academic Authors: Oct. 25 at 2 – 3 p.m.

QGIS: Building Skills with Vector Data: Nov. 2 at 2 – 3 p.m….”