WG 4 ETHICS OF OPEN SHARING Public Draft – Google Docs

“The working group welcomes your thoughts, comments and suggestions on this draft  of the position paper, which will remain open for consultation until the 24th of October. The paper will be presented alongside those of the three other working groups on 9 November, 2021, from 4:00 pm UTC to 5:30 pm UTC. 

Please ensure you are working in ‘suggesting’ (track changes) mode. We do not want to add significantly to the document length, but welcome better examples, sharper points and clearer phrasing. …”

BOAI 20th Anniversary: Questions for the OA community | EIFL

“The Budapest Open Access Initiative (BOAI) will celebrate its 20th anniversary on 14 February 2022. In preparation, the BOAI steering committee is working on a new set of recommendations, based on BOAI principles, current circumstances, and input from colleagues in all academic fields and regions of the world. 

We’re particularly interested in responses to the questions below. When a question asks about the long-term goals of the open access (OA) movement, please answer in light of your own long-term goals for it. Feel free to focus on just the questions you think are most important. Also feel free to add questions of your own that don’t appear on our list….”

Consultation on a ‘Declaration of Digital Principles’ | Europeana Pro

“In this context, the Europeana Foundation, Network Association and Aggregators’ Forum, collectively representing the Europeana Initiative, strongly support a rights-based, people-centred approach to the concept of digital citizenship and the development of principles that promote a more equitable and democratic digital environment in which

basic liberties and rights are protected online, 

sovereignty of data is protected,

public institutions are empowered to function in the public interest, and 

people are able to participate more fully in the creation, functioning and potential of their digital environment.  …

The Europeana Initiative recognises the relevance and importance of these principles through its work with the cultural heritage sector, and we believe that we have useful insights to share on them. However we believe that a fundamental principle is missing – that of universal access to cultural heritage online. …

Europeana’s focus is on supporting the cultural heritage sector in its digital transformation  because access to cultural heritage is vital to humankind – to our knowledge and understanding of who we are, where we’ve come from and what we can become. Democratising access to cultural heritage online, in ways that support inclusivity, innovation, creativity, education and knowledge sharing, is at the heart of Europeana’s purpose….

We work with Europe’s cultural heritage institutions to ensure that digital cultural heritage is shared in formats and of a quality which allows use and reuse by researchers and educators, creatives and innovators, and all citizens. Our work promotes the use of digital technology that makes cultural heritage online accessible, traceable and trustworthy, which in turn means people can explore it, use it, be inspired by it and learn from it with confidence. It contributes to an open, knowledgeable and creative society….”

 

NIH Request for Information on Streamlining Access to Controlled Data from NIH Data Repositories | Data Science at NIH

“The National Institutes of Health (NIH) released today a Request for Information (RFI) on streamlining access to controlled data from NIH data repositories (NOT-OD-21-157). Responses are due Aug. 9. 

The NIH is requesting input on strategies for harmonizing, simplifying, and streamlining mechanisms for accessing data in NIH-supported controlled-access data repositories that continue to uphold robust data privacy and security protections. In particular, NIH would like to understand better researchers’ experiences in finding and accessing controlled access data housed in NIH-supported repositories and the extent to which existing NIH policies address aggregation and linkage of controlled access data….”

Dr. Jessica Gardner on the ongoing negotiation between Cambridge and Elsevier | Unlocking Research

This post by Dr Jessica Gardner, Cambridge University Librarian, introduces the context for the ongoing negotiation between Cambridge University and the publisher Elsevier. It is the first in a series of posts on the negotiation from members of the Cambridge community.

FAIRsFAIR teaching and training handbook for HEIs – Google Docs

“The handbook was written and edited by a group of about 40 collaborators in a series of six book sprint events that took place between 1 and 10 June 2021. It aims to support higher education institutions the practical implementation of content relating to the FAIR principles in their curricula and teaching by providing practical material, such as lesson plans, and supporting information.

The feedback to the current draft version for public review will inform future iterations. The final version of the handbook will be published in December 2021. …”

Reimagining Wikidata from the margins | document/manifesto | June-October 2021

“Wikidata’s ecosystem has been rapidly growing over the last nine years …[but] we’re still missing Global South and other marginalized communities from the North – both in data and in contributors….

Reimagining Wikidata from the margins is a process that precedes WikidataCon 2021 and that potentially will continue after the conference in October. This is an invitation to communities and individuals from underrepresented groups (plus good allies!) so we can better understand and envision possible ways for our meaningful and empowered agency in the broad Wikidata ecosystem!

Objectives

Awaken the debate within a diverse range of communities from Global South and other marginalized communities
Foment bonds between communities in similar contexts
Identify specific and general problems/challenges/needs/expectations from those communities regarding Wikidata
Elaborate collaboratively a strategy for decentering Wikidata from its current focus on North America and Europe
Consolidate a document/manifesto
Integrate to the conference program this decentering perspectives and the Global South voice…

How will it work?…After the rounds of conversations, we will gather a group of volunteers who participated in them to draft a document, summarizing the discussions and looking for possible ways to further integrate data and volunteers from marginalized communities on Wikidata. The document will be released during WikidataCon 2021, in the hope that it will be an initial step towards effectively decentering Wikidata and lifting up underrepresented voices….

Timeline:

June/July: First round of discussions with local communities
August: Round of thematic meetings with people from different locations
September: A volunteer committee engaged on previous discussions gather for writing a document/manifesto
October: Final review of the document and launching at WikidataCon 2021…”

FAIR Principles for Research Software (FAIR4RS Principles) | RDA

“Research software is a fundamental and vital part of research worldwide, yet there remain significant challenges to software productivity, quality, reproducibility, and sustainability. Improving the practice of scholarship is a common goal of the open science, open source software and FAIR (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable) communities, but improving the sharing of research software has not yet been a strong focus of the latter.

To improve the FAIRness of research software, the FAIR for Research Software (FAIR4RS) Working Group has sought to understand how to apply the FAIR Guiding Principles for scientific data management and stewardship to research software, bringing together existing and new community efforts. Many of the FAIR Guiding Principles can be directly applied to research software by treating software and data as similar digital research objects. However, specific characteristics of software — such as its executability, composite nature, and continuous evolution and versioning — make it necessary to revise and extend the principles.

This document presents the first version of the FAIR Principles for Research Software (FAIR4RS Principles). It is an outcome of the FAIR for Research Software Working Group (FAIR4RS WG).

The FAIR for Research Software Working Group is jointly convened as an RDA Working Group, FORCE11 Working Group, and Research Software Alliance (ReSA) Task Force.”

Reporting Global Usage and Usage of Open Content Not Attributed to Institutions

“The COUNTER Code of Practice currently states about the Institution_Name in the report header that ‘For OA publishers and repositories, where it is not possible to identify usage by individual institutions, the usage should be attributed to “The World”’ (Section 3.2.1, Table 3.f). When this rule was added the focus was on fully Open Access publishers, and the expectation – which obviously was wrong and has caused some confusion – was that the fully OA publishers would not try to attribute usage to institutions. So, a report to “The World” was intended to include all global usage, whether attributed to institutions or not.

This document shows how usage could be reported to “The World” and how the global usage could be broken down and filtered.

Please note, that these reports would NOT be a mandatory requirement. Those content providers that wished to use them, could do so.

We are seeking your thoughts about how useful these reports might be, and more specifically on some of the technical details. Please provide your feedback at https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/3CQZVH2  The survey questions are included at the end of this document, so that you can discuss them with colleagues before submitting your responses online….”

Consultation with Indigenous Peoples on the UNESCO Recommendation on Open Science

“As a part of a series of thematic consultations for building a global consensus on Open Science, UNESCO organized an online meeting on January 15 to take stock of Indigenous peoples‘ perspective on Open Science.  

In view of developing a standard-setting instrument on Open Science, UNESCO is leading an inclusive, transparent and consultative process. In this process, inclusiveness of diverse knowledge systems and knowledge holders is essential, and the first draft of the Recommendation is based on the broad inputs provided by stakeholders from all regions and groups.

Considering the great importance given to the creation of a productive relationship between Open Science and Indigenous Knowledge Systems, the consultation with Indigenous Peoples brought together 120 participants from 50 countries, including indigenous scholars and academics, members of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues (UNPFII), members of different initiatives such as the Forest Peoples Programme, the Global Indigenous Data Alliance, the International Indigenous Forum on Biodiversity, and the drafting committee of the CARE principles for Indigenous Data Governance.    …”