Please sign the statement: Make knowledge accessible to all. No to banning Sci-Hub and LibGen – Breakthrough Science Society

“We are shocked to learn that three academic publishers — Elsevier, Wiley, and the American Chemical Society (ACS) — have filed a suit in the Delhi High Court on December 21, 2020, seeking a ban on the websites Sci-Hub and LibGen which have made academic research-related information freely available to all. Academic research cannot flourish without the free flow of information between those who produce it and those who seek it, and we strongly oppose the contention of the lawsuit.

International publishers like Elsevier have created a business model where they treat knowledge created by academic research funded by taxpayers’ money as their private property. Those who produce this knowledge — the authors and reviewers of research papers — are not paid and yet these publishers make windfall profit of billions of dollars by selling subscriptions to libraries worldwide at exorbitantly inflated rates which most institutional libraries in India, and even developed countries, cannot afford. Without a subscription, a researcher has to pay between $30 and $50 to download each paper, which most individual Indian researchers cannot afford. Instead of facilitating the flow of research information, these companies are throttling it.

Alexandra Elbakyan of Kazakhstan has taken an effective and widely welcomed step by making research papers, book chapters and similar research-related information freely available through her website Sci-Hub. Libgen (Library Genesis) renders a similar service. We support their initiative which, we contend, does not violate any norm of ethics or intellectual property rights as the research papers are actually intellectual products of the authors and the institutions.

We strongly oppose any form of commoditization of research information that is a hindrance to the development of science and the humanities. In the interest of the advancement of knowledge, Sci-Hub and Libgen should be allowed to operate in India.”

Indian scientists express support for free access to academic research – Telegraph India

“Sections of India’s science community have asked the Centre to oppose a petition by three international academic publishers in Delhi High Court seeking a ban on two alleged pirate websites that offer free access to academic research.

Over 2,000 teachers, scholars and students from institutions across India in a statement released on Friday urged the court and the Centre to allow researchers in India continued access to Sci-Hub and LibGen….”

Please sign the statement: Make knowledge accessible to all. No to banning Sci-Hub and LibGen – Breakthrough Science Society

“We are shocked to learn that three academic publishers — Elsevier, Wiley, and the American Chemical Society (ACS) — have filed a suit in the Delhi High Court on December 21, 2020, seeking a ban on the websites Sci-Hub and LibGen which have made academic research-related information freely available to all. Academic research cannot flourish without the free flow of information between those who produce it and those who seek it, and we strongly oppose the contention of the lawsuit.

International publishers like Elsevier have created a business model where they treat knowledge created by academic research funded by taxpayers’ money as their private property. Those who produce this knowledge — the authors and reviewers of research papers — are not paid and yet these publishers make windfall profit of billions of dollars by selling subscriptions to libraries worldwide at exorbitantly inflated rates which most institutional libraries in India, and even developed countries, cannot afford. Without a subscription, a researcher has to pay between $30 and $50 to download each paper, which most individual Indian researchers cannot afford. Instead of facilitating the flow of research information, these companies are throttling it.

Alexandra Elbakyan of Kazakhstan has taken an effective and widely welcomed step by making research papers, book chapters and similar research-related information freely available through her website Sci-Hub. Libgen (Library Genesis) renders a similar service. We support their initiative which, we contend, does not violate any norm of ethics or intellectual property rights as the research papers are actually intellectual products of the authors and the institutions.

We strongly oppose any form of commoditization of research information that is a hindrance to the development of science and the humanities. In the interest of the advancement of knowledge, Sci-Hub and Libgen should be allowed to operate in India.”

Elsevier Wants To Stop Indian Medics, Students And Academics Accessing Knowledge The Only Way Most Of Them Can Afford: Via Sci-Hub And Libgen | Techdirt

“Last month Techdirt wrote about some ridiculous scaremongering from Elsevier against Sci-Hub, which the publisher claimed was a “security risk”. Sci-Hub, with its 85 million academic papers, is an example of what are sometimes termed “shadow libraries”. For many people around the world, especially in developing countries, such shadow libraries are very often the only way medics, students and academics can access journals whose elevated Western-level subscription prices are simply unaffordable for them. That fact makes a new attack by Elsevier, Wiley and the American Chemical Society against Sci-Hub and the similar Libgen shadow library particularly troubling….”

Elsevier and Wiley Declare War on Research Community in India | NewsClick

“Three academic publishers are asking for blocking of Sci-Hub and Libgen in India, two websites who provide free downloads of research publications and books to research scholars and students. The three—Elsevier Ltd., Wiley India Pvt. Ltd., American Chemical Society—have filed a petition in Delhi High Court, which is now scheduled to be heard next on January 6. 

The publishers, who have filed similar suits in other countries as well, would have us believe it is them versus the pirate sites. What they hide is that there is another community involved here, students, teachers and research scholars, whose access to these journals would virtually end if the publishers have their way in court. This would have serious and long term consequences for science and technology in India.

Who are these three publishers in Delhi High Court? Elsevier, Wiley and American Chemical Society together publish 40% of scientific publications. If we take the five top publishers, they control more than 50% of the publications in science and social sciences worldwide, one of the largest concentrations of market power in any sector. Journal publishing is a $10 billion industry, with one of the highest profit margins of any sector. The profit margin of Elsevier is 37%, twice that of Google, the latter under attack globally for its monopoly practices and super-profits….”

Open-Access Science Journals May Be Banned in India. This is Bad News for Everyone

“global pandemic may be the worst time to cut off access to science research, but India may be on its way to it.

A copyright infringement suit filed by three publishing giants against Sci-Hub and Libgen, both open-source access publications, before the Delhi High Court on December 21, 2020 may be the end of ‘free academic material’ in India. 

The three giants are Elsevier, Wiley and American Chemical Society, and the first date of hearing is on 24th. 

In the suit, the companies allege that the defendant (Alexandra Elbakyan, founder of SciHub) is “well aware of the infringing nature of content available on the Sci-Hub website,” and “completely disregards intellectual properly claims.” 

It also notes that the plaintifs had sent earlier legal notices to Elbakyan, who had disregarded them, forcing them to take this legal action….”

 

WHOIS behind SNSI & GetFTR? | Motley Marginalia

“I question whether such rich personally identifiably information (PII) is required to prevent illicit account access. If it is collected at all, there are more than enough data points here (obviously excluding username and account information) to deanonymize individuals and reveal exactly what they looked at and when so it should not be kept on hand too long for later analysis.

Another related, though separate endeavor is GetFTR which aims to bypass proxies (and thereby potential library oversight of use) entirely. There is soo much which could be written about both these efforts and this post only scratches the surface of some of the complex issues and relationships affect by them.

The first thing I was curious about was, who is bankrolling these efforts? They list the backers on their websites but I always find it interesting as to who is willing to fund the coders and infrastructure. I looked up both GetFTR and SNSI in the IRS Tax Exempt database as well as the EU Find a Company portal and did not find any results. So I decided to do a little more digging matching WHOIS data in the hopes that something might pop out, nothing interesting came of this so I put it at the very bottom….

It should come as no surprise that Elsevier, Springer Nature, ACS, and Wiley – which previous research has shown are the publishers producing the most research downloaded in the USA from Sci-Hub – are supporting both efforts. Taylor & Francis presumably feels sufficiently threatened such that they are along for the ride….”

Celebrating 5 Years of Open Access with ACS Omega | ACS Omega

“2020 marks the fifth year in which ACS Omega has published high-quality content that describes new findings in chemistry and interfacing areas of science, without any perceived evaluation of immediate impact. Since January, all front covers and much of our marketing material have included a badge commemorating this significant milestone.

For us—the Editors, the journal, and the staff at ACS Publications—time seems to have passed remarkably quickly since we first set out on this mission to provide a fully open-access platform to disseminate technically sound research that advances the frontiers of science through original ideas. The journal has come a long way since the first issue in volume 1 was released in July 2016, and the quality of the work published throughout this time has been consistently high. Starting with the publication of research articles only, we then added “Perspective” and “Mini-Review” manuscript types to allow exposure of recent trends in a wide variety of areas, thus broadening the scope and appeal of the journal. The year-on-year increase in submissions and published output reflects the progress the journal has made. ACS Omega has published over 7000 articles from researchers based in 98 different countries. We received our latest impact factor of 2.87 this summer and earned 10?646 citations in 2019 (Journal Citation Reports, Clarivate), another indicator of the progress the journal has made in a short space of time. We have our Editors (both past and present), our dedicated ACS staff, our reviewers, our authors, and our readership to thank for the vital contributions they have made to the success of the journal….”

American Chemical Society signs transformative open access agreement with Polish Academic Consortium | STM Publishing News

“The Publications Division of the American Chemical Society (ACS) is pleased to announce that it has signed a transformative “read and publish” agreement with the Polish Academic Consortium. The agreement, which lasts through 2022, will benefit 51 institutions across Poland and will enable hundreds of articles to be made open access each year.

Under the terms of this agreement, researchers at universities across Poland will be able to publish under the most liberal of open access licenses, CC-BY. They will also benefit from a highly streamlined process aligning their journal article to the article publication charges covered by this agreement. Researchers at participating institutions will also have access to the over 65 premier journals published by ACS….”

American Chemical Society signs transformative open access agreement with Polish Academic Consortium | STM Publishing News

“The Publications Division of the American Chemical Society (ACS) is pleased to announce that it has signed a transformative “read and publish” agreement with the Polish Academic Consortium. The agreement, which lasts through 2022, will benefit 51 institutions across Poland and will enable hundreds of articles to be made open access each year.

Under the terms of this agreement, researchers at universities across Poland will be able to publish under the most liberal of open access licenses, CC-BY. They will also benefit from a highly streamlined process aligning their journal article to the article publication charges covered by this agreement. Researchers at participating institutions will also have access to the over 65 premier journals published by ACS….”

ACS Publications announces new open science resource center – American Chemical Society

“In an ever-changing scholarly publishing environment, the American Chemical Society (ACS) Publications Division is deepening its commitment to open science and open access. Through a curated set of materials on its new open science resource center, ACS is leading the way for researchers to become active participants in this movement.

Researchers, librarians and administrators who visit this resource will find information on open science and open access publishing, will learn how to comply with funder requirements and will be able to search ACS’ open access agreements to find out if they are eligible to have article publishing charges (known as APCs) waived. These new tools will speed the transition to an open science future by effectively communicating how open access publishing works for ACS’ extensive community of authors….

James Milne, Ph.D., president, ACS Publications Division [said,] “We are committed to leading the open science movement.” …”

Encouraging Submission of FAIR Data at The Journal of Organic Chemistry and Organic Letters | The Journal of Organic Chemistry

“The ACS is eager to assist. ACS has now developed a data packaging tool to assist authors in zipping their FID files, acquisition data, and processing parameters along with other appropriate FAIR metadata such as a SMILES or InChI for submission. This tool can be found at ACS Research Data Center, is free for any researcher to use, and includes instructions for authors on how to upload their data. In addition, author guidelines at The Journal of Organic Chemistry and Organic Letters offer details on how to zip and submit your data (see Primary NMR Data Files under the Supporting Information heading). All zipped files of data should be uploaded as ‘Supporting Information for Publication’. Along with the zipped files of NMR data, original Elemental Analysis, HRMS, or IR reports are also encouraged and can be included as “Supporting Information for Publication’.

Including data alongside a publication has many benefits for authors, editors, reviewers, and readers. For authors, it will help in compliance with data-management plans and any funder requirements that data be made publicly available. The data will be citable and can be included in grant applications or updates to funders. Readily available data can provide a needed service to the community, much like reviewing, and will improve archiving for the long-term benefit of the scientific community. As an incentive, participating ACS publications identified with FAIR data will include a note in the PDF and HTML that FAIR data is available.

For editors and reviewers, it is valuable to have consistent quality of NMR and other data during the review process. While incidents of unethical behavior are rare, uploading original data can increase safeguarding against fraudulent or manipulated data. Providing data alongside a submission reduces requests from the editorial office for original FID data, for example, when the images uploaded in the SI are of inadequate resolution or appear to be manipulated.

For readers, access to primary data files allows for easy and direct comparison to published results. This is helpful when reproducing published work, specifically, to have the ability to evaluate compound purity, as well as zoom, integrate, and interact with the spectra….”

American Chemical Society joins other publishers in letter opposing administration’s changes to open access policy – American Chemical Society

“The American Chemical Society (ACS), as part of a coalition of 60 scientific societies, has issued a letter today expressing deep concern over changes proposed to the administration’s policy governing the open distribution of published journal articles containing federally funded research.If issued, these changes threaten the ability of the American scientific enterprise to remain a global leader in driving discovery and innovation.

Under the current policy, free and open distribution of journal articles containing work resulting from U.S. federally funded research is subject to a 12-month embargo. Under the proposed change, this embargo period would be removed, and the journal articles would need to be made freely available upon publishing.

“The proposed changes could result in unintended consequences that undermine the global scientific leadership of the U.S.,” says Glenn S. Ruskin, vice president, ACS External Affairs & Communications. “The proposed changes could also interfere with the efforts made by publishers to responsibly and transparently move toward greater open access of the research reported in their journals. We remain committed to working with all interested stakeholders to ensure the development of a robust and sustainable policy in this area.”

The full letter is available here….”