Montreal’s McCord Museum launches remarkable new open access online platform | Arts | thesuburban.com

“To mark its 100th anniversary, the McCord Museum is launching a new open access platform with bilingual descriptions of over 140,000 objects, photographs, and archival documents from its collections. The site also features approximately 130,000 royalty-free images that may be downloaded in the highest resolution available, free of charge, with no restrictions on their use.

Created to provide unparalleled access to the Museum’s collections, the project is a first for the institution. The new platform, whose content will be constantly updated, was launched with the support of the Azrieli Foundation and Canadian Heritage….”

Digitization, open access and the internet aid UCLA’s return of books looted by Nazis | UCLA

“For two decades the Jewish Museum in Prague, or JMP, has undertaken a global search for lost publications from the city’s Jewish Community Library, which was looted and shuttered by Nazi occupiers during World War II. With the recent emphasis on digitization of collections by academic libraries, including UCLA’s, the museum’s work has become a lot easier and more fruitful. The JMP’s efforts to repatriate these stolen items have increased in intensity as anyone capable of using an online search tool can access these vast online repositories.

UCLA Library is one of the earliest and largest contributors to one such repository, the HathiTrust — a collaborative of academic research libraries that have thus far digitized 17 million volumes and made them full-text-searchable….”

Chopin Heritage in Open Access – Répertoire International des Sources Musicales

“30,000 photographs, 500 first editions of Chopin’s works, more than 3,000 issues of 19th-century magazines, almost 1,000 hours of recordings, manuscripts, works, Fryderyk Chopin’s correspondence, hundreds of iconographic objects and works of art – the largest Chopin collection in the world is now available online for free!…”

Saving Ukrainian Cultural Heritage Online | webinar | May 13, 2022 | San José State University, US

“We invite you to join the SJSU King Library and special guest speakers Anna E. Kijas from Tufts University and Quinn Dombrowski from Stanford University to learn the story behind the grassroots organization Saving Ukrainian Cultural Heritage Online (SUCHO). Time May 13, 2022 12:00 PM in Pacific Time (US and Canada)”

Study on quality in 3D digitisation of tangible cultural heritage | Shaping Europe’s digital future

“The purpose of this call for tenders is to carry out a study to map parameters, formats, standards, benchmarks, methodologies and guidelines, relating to 3D digitisation of tangible cultural heritage, to the different potential purposes or uses, i.e. preservation, reconstruction, reproduction, research, and general-purpose visualisation, by type of tangible cultural heritage, i.e. immovable or movable, and by degree of complexity of tangible cultural heritage, e.g. low, medium, high, and very high (reference VIGIE-2020-654)….”

UChicago Library awarded grant to digitize Chicagoland’s historical maps | University of Chicago News

“The National Endowment for the Humanities has awarded the University of Chicago Library, in partnership with the Newberry Library and the Chicago History Museum, a grant to digitize historical maps of Chicago from the 19th century through 1940.

The grant of $348,930 to fund their proposal, “Mapping Chicagoland,” will also support the enrichment of the digital images with geographic information for use in spatial overlays and analyses, as well as the work to make them open to the public on the UChicago Library website. The maps will also be available through the BTAA (Big Ten Academic Alliance) Geoportal and Chicago Collections platforms….”

Archives, Access and Artificial Intelligence bei Transcript Publishing

“Digital archives are transforming the Humanities and the Sciences. Digitized collections of newspapers and books have pushed scholars to develop new, data-rich methods. Born-digital archives are now better preserved and managed thanks to the development of open-access and commercial software. Digital Humanities have moved from the fringe to the center of academia. Yet, the path from the appraisal of records to their analysis is far from smooth. This book explores crossovers between various disciplines to improve the discoverability, accessibility, and use of born-digital archives and other cultural assets….

 

Introduction
Seiten 7 – 28

Chapter 1: Artificial Intelligence and Discovering the Digitized Photoarchive
Seiten 29 – 60

Chapter 2: Web Archives and the Problem of Access: Prototyping a Researcher Dashboard for the UK Government Web Archive
Seiten 61 – 82

Chapter 3: Design Thinking, UX and Born-digital Archives: Solving the Problem of Dark Archives Closed to Users
Seiten 83 – 108

Chapter 4: Towards Critically Addressable Data for Digital Library User Studies
Seiten 109 – 130

Chapter 5: Reviewing the Reviewers: Training Neural Networks to Read Peer Review Reports
Seiten 131 – 156

Chapter 6: Supervised and Unsupervised: Approaches to Machine Learning for Textual Entities
Seiten 157 – 178

Chapter 7: Inviting AI into the Archives: The Reception of Handwritten Recognition Technology into Historical Manuscript Transcription
Seiten 179 – 204

AFTERWORD: Towards a new Discipline of Computational Archival Science (CAS)
Seiten 205 – 218 …

[From the Introduction:]

The closure of libraries, archives and museums due to the COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the urgent need to make archives and cultural heritage materials accessible in digital form. Yet too many born-digital and digitized collections remain closed to researchers and other users due to privacy concerns, copyright and other issues. Born-digital archives are rarely accessible to users. For example, the archival emails of the writer Will Self at the British Library are not listed on the Finding Aid describing the collection, and they are not available to users either onsite or offsite. At a time when emails have largely replaced letters, this severely limits the amount of content openly accessible in archival collections. Even when digital data is publicly available (as in the case of web archives), users often need to physically travel to repositories to consult web pages. In the case of digitized collections, copyright can also be a major obstacle to access. For instance, copyrightprotected texts are not available for download from HathiTrust, a not-for-profit collaborative of academic and research libraries preserving 17+ million digitized items (including around 61% not in the public domain)….

It is important to recognize that “dark” archives contain vast amounts of data essential to scholars – including email corres

Digital Knowledge Sharing Workshop Keynote with Stephen Curley – YouTube

“The keynote event of the APS’s Library & Museum’s 4th annual Digital Knowledge Sharing workshop was hosted by the APS’s Center for Native American and Indigenous Research (CNAIR) and the Native American Scholars Initiative (NASI), supported by the Mellon Foundation.

This virtual keynote conversation event featured Stephen Curley, Director of Digital Archives for the National Native American Boarding Schools Healing Coalition, in conversation with Brian Carpenter, Curator of Indigenous Materials at the APS’s Library & Museum. The conversation covered topics such as processes for Tribal and non-Tribal archives to reach out to each other to foster ethical stewardship and curation of Indigenous archival materials, current efforts in the digital curation of Native American boarding school resources, the centrality of honoring and acknowledging relationships versus academic tendencies of individualistic work, and a look back and look forward at developments in the archives field surrounding ethical best practices in culturally responsive care and curation of Indigenous archival collections.”

Towards Better Sharing of Cultural Heritage — An Agenda for Copyright Reform

“This paper is intended to act as a pillar and reference point for CC’s advocacy work in copyright reform in the cultural heritage context, with a focus on issues arising in the digital environment. It may serve to support members of the CC community in their own advocacy efforts, guide policymakers in their legislative processes, and inform anyone interested in the policy issues gravitating around access and reuse of culture and cultural heritage. It will likely be adapted into a GLAM Guide for Policymakers and will be augmented with real-life examples, case studies and practical advice. It starts with an overview of copyright challenges to the legitimate activities of GLAMs, notably preservation (largely through digitization) and sharing of digital and digitized content images and data for access, use and reuse. It also notes copyright’s chilling effects in the face of the GLAM sector’s general risk aversion. The paper then offers insights towards effective copyright reform addressing those challenges, with a focus on the opportunities related to the digital environment. The proposals for reform aim to create legal certainty and international harmonization as well as to facilitate cross-border transactions. The paper encourages policymakers to recognize and support the pivotal roles of GLAMs in preserving and providing access to knowledge and culture to all members of society. It urges policymakers to engage with stakeholders to ensure there are clear, simple, and effective policies in place to support better sharing of cultural heritage in the public interest. The paper provides a high-level overview of the policy issues and, as a whole, it does not necessarily reflect the current situation in any specific jurisdiction.”

Open Learning Talks | Open Education, Cultural Collection, and Curation: Focus on HBCUs – YouTube

“Although more learners and educators continue to adopt and create open education resources (OERs), there has been a dearth of culturally-relevant content created by and curated for underserved and underrepresented populations. In this Open Learning Talk, we’ll hear from members of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and learn about their journey to opening up and creating a more inclusive canon of OER for HBCUs and the world.”

Preserving Ukraine’s Cultural Heritage Online | Tufts Now

“The effort started in late February, just days after Russia invaded Ukraine, when Kijas mused on Twitter about launching a project to save digitized music collections, her area of expertise. The project soon attracted more than 1,000 volunteers from around the world—librarians, archivists, researchers, and programmers, some of them fluent in Ukrainian—and is now co-organized by Kijas, Quinn Dombrowski of Stanford University, and Sebastian Majstorovic of the Austrian Center for Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage.

The group is crawling websites, digital exhibits, and open access publications of Ukrainian cultural institutions with automated computer programs that search sites and collect data. The group also manually archives pages and files. Volunteers have added more than 10 terabytes of data to servers outside the country and saved almost 15,000 files to the Internet Archive,  where it has a collection. (One terabyte is equal to 1,000 gigabytes, or about the amount of data that could be stored on 16 iPhones.)…”

CC Australia’s response to the exposure draft of the Access Reform Bill | by Elliott Bledsoe | Creative Commons: We Like to Share | Mar, 2022 | Medium

“On Friday 25 February the Creative Commons Australia Chapter (CC Australia) made a submission to the Australian Government Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Communications in response to their consultation on the exposure draft of the Copyright Amendment (Access Reform) Bill 2021 and a review of the technological protection measures (TPMs) exceptions in the Copyright Regulations 2017….

In the submission, CC Australia expresses its support for the proposed reforms as they harmonise with CC’s vision and mission. There are strong public interest arguments to support activating orphan works and supporting equitable access to cultural collections (and it aligns with CC’s Open GLAM Program). Permitting quotation of copyright material in a range of noncommercial scenarios will help make research available to the research community and the public quicker. And further facilitating online education and encouraging flexibility in the delivery of government services are both worthwhile endeavours….”

Timbuktu manuscripts: Mali’s ancient documents captured online – BBC News

“A virtual gallery to showcase Mali’s cultural history has been launched, featuring tens of thousands of Timbuktu’s ancient manuscripts….

It is a project the people of Mali have kept their eyes on for many years since Islamist militants set fire to libraries in Timbuktu as they tried to destroy the priceless papers.

Over a period of six months, manuscripts were smuggled out of Timbuktu to Mali’s capital Bamako, as time was running out to rescue and preserve the documents from near destruction….

 

It was the first time that the court in The Hague had tried a case of cultural destruction….

This project to preserve Mali’s manuscripts is not however the first attempt. The University of Cape Town launched the Tombouctou Manuscripts Project in 2003, with an emphasis on “manuscript traditions throughout the African continent”, according to the website.

Similarly, the US Library of Congress has made some of the manuscripts available online.”

Copyright and Open Access in UK Heritage Collections Tickets, Wed 16 Mar 2022 at 14:00 | Eventbrite

“The Towards a National Collection Directorate is pleased to announce a webinar on the topic of copyright and open access in UK heritage collections. Our two speakers, both experts in their fields, have been commissioned by Towards a National Collection to prepare state-of-the-sector reports to open debate on future copyright and open access practice and recommendations. The recommendations they will present are their own and their reports form part of the evidence that Towards a National Collection continues to gather to determine the future policies it will recommend. We look forward to hearing your thoughts in this vital area….”