An open repository of real-time COVID-19 indicators | PNAS

Abstract:  The COVID-19 pandemic presented enormous data challenges in the United States. Policy makers, epidemiological modelers, and health researchers all require up-to-date data on the pandemic and relevant public behavior, ideally at fine spatial and temporal resolution. The COVIDcast API is our attempt to fill this need: Operational since April 2020, it provides open access to both traditional public health surveillance signals (cases, deaths, and hospitalizations) and many auxiliary indicators of COVID-19 activity, such as signals extracted from deidentified medical claims data, massive online surveys, cell phone mobility data, and internet search trends. These are available at a fine geographic resolution (mostly at the county level) and are updated daily. The COVIDcast API also tracks all revisions to historical data, allowing modelers to account for the frequent revisions and backfill that are common for many public health data sources. All of the data are available in a common format through the API and accompanying R and Python software packages. This paper describes the data sources and signals, and provides examples demonstrating that the auxiliary signals in the COVIDcast API present information relevant to tracking COVID activity, augmenting traditional public health reporting and empowering research and decision-making.

 

Partnership Announcement: Cypris and CORE

“We’re delighted to announce a new partnership between CORE and Cypris, a leading AI-driven, market intelligence platform that connects research & development (R&D) teams with innovation data and trends in their field.

The partnership will provide Cypris with unlimited access to over 210 million open access articles to further enhance their platform and regularly add live market data to provide R&D teams with the most up-to-date research in their fields of interest….”

Three lessons I learned from building Spark – a new (open access) discovery extension

“After over five years of work around scholarly communication, I have to say that this field never ceases to impress me. If you look away for a minute, you’ll be welcomed back by all sorts of developments, including shifting cultures, new funding models, emerging practices and new software solutions. This summer, I thought I would start a project to experiment with the tech side of scholarly communication – particularly, I wanted to create a browser extension focusing on the pain points of researchers.

My summer adventure started in June, when I sat in front of my screen with no idea how browser extensions even worked. Today, I am proud to say that Spark, the fruit of my coding experiments, has been approved in the Chrome Web Store. In this article, I share three lessons I learned during this fun yet challenging experience….”

Release of DSpace 7.0

“DSpace 7.0 is the largest release in the history of DSpace software. This release introduces a brand new (Angular-base) User Interface, which brings together the best of both the JSPUI and XMLUI worlds. All the features you’ve come to expect from DSpace are re-imagined and re-implemented. This new UI is also backed by a brand new REST API, which opens all data and features to the web, allowing DSpace to integrate or interact with external systems/services like never before….”

Some rip-RORing news for affiliation metadata – Crossref

“We’ve just added to our input schema the ability to include affiliation information using ROR identifiers. Members who register content using XML can now include ROR IDs, and we’ll add the capability to our manual content registration tools, participation dashboards, and metadata retrieval APIs in the near future. And we are inviting members to a Crossref/ROR webinar on 29th September at 3pm UTC.”

APIv3: Announcing a new API to access CORE data – Research

“Since the start (10 years ago!) CORE’s mission has been to aggregate and facilitate access to open access scientific research at an unprecedented scale to both humans and machines. To achieve this aim, we are always refining and improving our methods for access and use of the CORE data. …

We are now delighted to bring our users further developments to the CORE services and announce the new CORE APIv3. The full details of the new API can be found in the documentation and you can register for a key in this URL. 

 

Below is  a quick overview of the new features in APIv3….”

We’re building a replacement for Microsoft Academic Graph – Our Research blog

“This week Microsoft Research announced that their free bibliographic database–Microsoft Academic Graph, or MAG for short–is being discontinued. This is sad news, because MAG was a great source of open scholcomm metadata, including citation counts and author affiliations. MAG data is used in Unsub, as well as several other well-known open science tools.

Thankfully, we’ve got a contingency plan for this situation, which we’ve been working on for a while now. We’re building a successor to MAG. Like all our projects, it’ll be open-source and the data will be free to everyone via data dump and API. It will launch at the end of the year, when MAG is scheduled to disappear.

It’s important to note that this new service will not be a perfect replacement, especially right when it launches. MAG has excellent support for conference proceedings, for example; we won’t match that for a while, if ever.  Instead, we’ll be focusing on supporting the most important use-cases, and building out from there. If you use MAG today, we’d love to hear what your key use-cases are, so we can prioritize accordingly. Here’s where you can tell us.

We plan to have this launched by the time MAG disappears at year’s end. That’s an aggressive schedule, but we’ve built and launched other large projects (Unpaywall, Unsub) in less time. We’ve also got a good head start, since we’ve been working toward this as an internal project for a while now….”