Do ‘Inclusive Access’ Textbook Programs Save Students Money? A New Site Urges Everyone to Read the Fine Print

““Inclusive access,” a textbook-sales model touted as a way to ensure that students without deep pockets can afford books, doesn’t always deliver on that promise, according to a leading open-access advocacy organization. So the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition and its partners have launched a website they hope will encourage a healthy skepticism, and deeper research, into the increasingly popular model.

Inclusive access programs weave the cost of digital course materials into a student’s tuition and fees, and are marketed as a heavily discounted alternative to traditional print textbooks. More than 950 college campuses have adopted related programs since 2015, when a Department of Education regulation enabled institutions to include books and supplies in their tuition or fees.

But advocates of open educational resources like Nicole Allen, Sparc’s director of open education, worry that colleges — clamoring for low-cost textbook options — are buying into the model without knowing for sure whether it’s actually saving their students money, considering the breadth of used-book and rental options available….”

Mellon Foundation awards ITHAKA $1.5 million to make JSTOR accessible to incarcerated college students – ITHAKA

“The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation has awarded ITHAKA a new $1.5 million grant to provide incarcerated college students with access to JSTOR, a digital library of journals, books, and other materials. Our aim is for every incarcerated college student in the United States to have access to JSTOR, along with the research skills to use this and other digital resources.

One of the most significant educational challenges that incarcerated college students face is easy, reliable access to high-quality library resources to support their learning. Prisons often do not provide internet access to individuals or offer only limited access to digital resources, sometimes at high cost. This challenge has only grown in the last 12 to 18 months as the COVID-19 pandemic ramped up the need for digital learning solutions and higher education became more accessible to incarcerated individuals through financial aid expansions, including Second Chance Pell….”

Diosi Project Trailer – YouTube

“The DIOSI project proposes a full cycle concept on doctoral education, from the development of a new joint doctoral educational programme, through the provision of training on Open Science and Open Innovation & Entrepreneurship for doctoral candidates and early career researchers (DCs and ECRs), to the measurement of impact of such training, by creating an impact and graduate tracking framework.”

Do Open Science Badges Increase Trust in Scientists among Undergraduates, Scientists, and the Public?

Abstract:  Open science badges are a promising method to signal a study’s adherence to open science practices (OSP). In three experimental studies, we investigated whether badges affect trust in scientists by undergraduates (N = 270), scientists (N = 250), or the public (N = 257). Furthermore, we analyzed the moderating role of epistemic beliefs in this regard. Participants were randomly assigned to two of three conditions: Badges awarded (visible compliance to OSP), badges not awarded (visible noncompliance to OSP), and no badges (control). In all samples, our Bayesian analyses indicated that badges influence trust as expected with one exception in the public sample: an additional positive effect of awarded badges compared to no badges was not supported here. Further, we found evidence for the absence of a moderation by epistemic beliefs. Our results demonstrate that badges are an effective means to foster trust in scientists among target audiences of scientific papers.

Wydzia? Nauk Ekonomicznych :: Doctoral Festival of Open Science [16-18.09.2021]

The PhD Students’ Council of the University of Warsaw kindly invites to participate in the Doctoral Festival of Open Science (DFON). The aim of the Festival is to disseminate scientific studies of young researchers from the fields of humanities, social sciences, exact and natural sciences and interdisciplinary fields. During the event the speakers (who are currently pursuing their doctorates) will present selected topic in an interesting and accessible way during short presentations. The speeches are addressed to everyone who is interested in broadening their scientific horizon in the field of humanities, social sciences, exact and natural sciences and interdisciplinary fields, as well as to the university communities of the 4EU+ alliance, i.e. the European Union: University of Warsaw (Poland), Charles University (Czech Republic), Heidelberg University (Germany), Sorbonne University (France), University of Copenhagen (Denmark) and University of Milan (Italy). The event will be held in Polish and in English. The festival will be mainly held online (on the ZOOM platform) from 16th to 18th of September, 2021. The day of the conference is planned in a hybrid mode (if the epidemic situation allows it).

New collection of open access final projects on gender studies | UOC Library

“The UOC’s O2 institutional repository has released a new collection of final projects on gender studies-related topics. It consists of 18 works from different fields of study at the University, including bachelor’s and master’s degree final projects involving the study of women, men, feminism and LGTBIQ issues. The collection will be regularly expanded.

This initiative forms part of the UOC’s 2020-2024 Equality Plan and has the goal of making the knowledge created around gender issues at the University available to the entire community and anyone else who may be interested. This will help foster and raise the profile of gender equality in research and knowledge transfer content….”

CFP: Creators in the Academic Library: Scholarly Communication & Intellectual Property | ACRL | deadline: July 19, 2021

“We are excited to invite chapter proposals for our forthcoming ACRL book, Creators in the Academic Library, with an anticipated publication date of Spring 2023.  …This edited volume will present chapters informed by the unique information needs of creators across many disciplines. These studies will demonstrate ways that academic librarians can implement services for creative practitioners in areas such as: service design, outreach, library spaces, collection building, and information literacy. By better understanding the creator community, librarians can develop more relevant and meaningful services and more powerfully connect with these students….

Scholarly Communication & Intellectual Property for Creators

Students in practitioner fields must understand how rights and responsibilities change from being a student, once they enter the professional world. In the academic context, plagiarism and citation are the most commonly explored aspects of giving credit, but these practices change in the professional world. As well, practitioner students will have to understand how intellectual property works in creator fields, and will grapple with fair use, copyright patents, trademarks and trade secrets. For those establishing fluency in both the academic and commercial realms, they must make complex decisions around open access and the value of intellectual property in a commercial contex. They may also face questions of the value of often undervalued work. This section will include case studies that introduce intellectual property and concepts to creator students. …”

due July 19, 2021

Students Among the Most Avid Readers of Open Access Journal Articles – NordMedia Network

Open access publishing is on the increase, but who are the readers of these scientific journals that are openly available?

 

A new article written by Finnish and Swedish researchers inquired into the readership of Finnish open access journals. Among 668 survey participants, the two largest groups were students (40%) and researchers (36%).

How Open Education Enables Culturally Responsive Teaching | Faculty Focus

“One way around this challenge of finding culturally relevant learning materials is to look to open educational resources (OER). Guided by the idea that high-quality materials should be available to—and reflective of—anyone, OER are free for educators and students to use, customize, and share. Because OER are customizable, they give educators the flexibility to incorporate voices, examples, and activities that reflect their students’ backgrounds and realities. They also allow students to contribute to educational content, bringing in their own experiences and knowledge….”

The Open Science Guide of Guides | Zenodo

“In this compendium, we compile Open Science guides with their specific features and fields of application. The book was made as part of a student seminar at the Hannover University of Applied Sciences and Arts in close cooperation with the TIB Open Science Lab as part of TIB Book Sprints R&D….”

Opening up Educational Practices through Faculty, Librarian, and Student Collaboration in OER Creation: Moving from Labor-intensive to Supervisory Involvement | Partnership: The Canadian Journal of Library and Information Practice and Research

Abstract:  This article presents a case study for transitioning library-led open-educational resources (OER) initiatives away from labor-intensive activities to a model where library personnel focus on project management responsibilities. This shift from labour-intensive activities, such as workshops and training sessions, led to more collaborative partnerships with faculty and students to produce OER projects. In particular, we focus on labour implications for the various stakeholders involved and the sustainability of these initiatives. We describe several initiatives undertaken by the Ohio University Libraries to encourage open educational resource adoptions and projects, including a grant-funded initiative to provide support services for faculty creating OER. That funding, which was awarded to enhance undergraduate education, has been used to support the development of five OER projects that have directly involved students in the creation of those materials. We provide an overview of the various ways in which students have become involved in OER creation in partnership with faculty and librarians and discuss the impact these partnerships have had on student-faculty-librarian relationships and student engagement. Among these projects are an Hispanic linguistics open textbook created using only student-authored texts, student-generated test banks to accompany existing OER materials for a large-enrollment art history course, and several other projects in which hired student assistants are helping faculty to develop content for open textbooks. This article helps to address a gap in the literature by providing transparency regarding the personnel, costs, and workflow for Ohio University Libraries’ OER initiatives and addressing potential areas of concern surrounding student labour. 

 

PsyArXiv Preprints | Nudging Open Science

Abstract:  In this article, we provide a toolbox of resources and nudges for those who are interested in advancing open scientific practice. Open Science encompasses a range of behaviours that aim to include the transparency of scientific research and how widely it is communicated. The paper is divided into seven sections, each dealing with a different stakeholder in the world of research (researchers, students, departments and faculties, universities, academic libraries, journals, and funders). With two frameworks in mind — EAST and the Pyramid of Culture Change — we describe the influences and incentives that sway behaviour for each of these stakeholders, we outline changes that can foster Open Science, and suggest actions and resources for individuals to nudge these changes. In isolation, a small shift in one person’s behaviour may appear to make little difference, but when combined, these small shifts can lead to radical changes in culture. We offer this toolbox to assist individuals and institutions in cultivating a more open research culture.

 

SMILE: Sustaining Medical Education in A Lockdown Environment. Student Perceptions of a Free Online Access Medical Education Platform as An Adjunct to The Traditional Undergraduate Curriculum During Lockdown | British Journal of Surgery | Oxford Academic

Abstract:  Introduction

The coronavirus outbreak has had significant impact on medical students worldwide. SMILE is a free online access medical education (FOAMEd) platform. SMILE delivered 200 lectures during lockdown with up to 1400 students per session from UK medical schools and 33 abroad. Here we discuss student perceptions to SMILE during lockdown

Method

A survey was used to collect information from students who had utilised the platform during lockdown. This examined access to learning, impact on mental health during lockdown and the differences between FOAMed and more traditional based campus lecture-based learning.

Results

1306 students responded to the survey. The majority of students were concerned regarding their training during lockdown, with 71% reporting an impact on their stress levels and 44% reporting a negative impact on mental health.

On average students attended 4.3hours of teaching put on by their university per week, vs 7.9hours by SMILE.

Positives included anonymity, making 80% more likely to both ask and answer questions, the informal approach, ease of access and enthusiastic teachers. Negatives included time differences and technical issues.

Conclusions

Lockdown provided challenges in medical education, which platforms like SMILE addressed. Our experiences highlighted many positive outcomes of online medical education that may be applicable to other educators.

WINNERS OF THE LATIN AMERICAN OPEN ACCESS ESSAY COMPETITION 2020

“The Open Access 2020 week was held with the theme “Openness with Purpose”, which provided the appropriate framework for AmeliCA, UNESCO, Redalyc and CLACSO to organize the Latin American Open Access Essay Competition 2020 with the theme “Open with Purpose: Taking Action to Build Structural Equity and Inclusion”, aimed at young Latin American researchers and students. The competition rules were published on September 30, 2020 and essays were received until December 28, 2020….”