Academic societies continue strong support of arXiv | arXiv.org blog

“Since 2019, seven academic societies have contributed to arXiv with funding and expertise. This type of steady support directly helps arXiv keep pace with exponential growth in usage and achieve its mission to provide an open research sharing platform where scholars can share and discover new, relevant, and emerging science, and establish their contribution to advancing research.

This year, the American Physical Society (APS) increased its contribution fivefold and became the first society to contribute as a Gold Affiliate. In addition to APS, the Association for Computing Machinery, the American Astronomical Society, and the American Mathematical Society have all pledged to continue supporting arXiv in 2022. arXiv is grateful for this support….”

A Checklist for Submitting Your Research to arXiv | by Liz Maag-Capriotti | Oct, 2021 | Towards Data Science

arXiv is a popular open-access archive of scholarly articles that has operated for the last 30 years and includes research in the fields of physics, mathematics, computer science, quantitative biology, quantitative finance, statistics, electrical engineering and systems science, and economics. arXiv has helped open science through pre-prints and improved global collaboration by allowing authors to share knowledge earlier in the scientific process and gain feedback on their research and ideas. Today arXiv remains one of the largest and exponentially growing preprint services.

Thank you to the early adopters of arXiv’s new membership model! | arXiv.org blog

“We’re pleased to announce that Caltech, CERN, Georgia Institute of Technology, and MIT have pledged to become “arXiv champions of open science” for 2022. Each of these institutions has chosen to contribute $10,000 each — and this support will have a significant impact on arXiv’s ability to serve researchers. Thank you for leading the global research community towards truly open science!…”

The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on academic productivity

Abstract:  ‘Publish or perish’ is an expression describing the pressure on academics to consistently publish research to ensure a successful career in academia. With a global pandemic that has changed the world, how has it changed academic productivity? Here we show that academics are posting just as many publications on the arXiv pre-print server as if there were no pandemic: 168,630 were posted in 2020, a +12.6% change from 2019 and +1.4? deviation above the predicted 162,577 ± 4,393. However, some immediate impacts are visible in individual research fields. Conference cancellations have led to sharp drops in pre-prints, but laboratory closures have had mixed effects. Only some experimental fields show mild declines in outputs, with most being consistent on previous years or even increasing above model expectations. The most significant change is a 50% increase (+8?) in quantitative biology research, all related to the COVID-19 pandemic. Some of these publications are by biologists using arXiv for the first time, and some are written by researchers from other fields (e.g., physicists, mathematicians). While quantitative biology pre-prints have returned to pre-pandemic levels, 20% of the research in this field is now focussed on the COVID-19 pandemic, demonstrating a strong shift in research focus.

Research data communication strategy at the time of pandemics: a retrospective analysis of the Italian experience | Monaldi Archives for Chest Disease

Abstract:  Coronavirus pandemic has radically changed the scientific world. During these difficult times, standard peer-review processes could be too long for the continuously evolving knowledge about this disease. We wanted to assess whether the use of other types of network could be a faster way to disseminate the knowledge about Coronavirus disease. We retrospectively analyzed the data flow among three distinct groups of networks during the first three months of the pandemic: PubMed, preprint repositories (biorXiv and arXiv) and social media in Italy (Facebook and Twitter). The results show a significant difference in the number of original research articles published by PubMed and preprint repositories. On social media, we observed an incredible number of physicians participating to the discussion, both on three distinct Italian-speaking Facebook groups and on Twitter. The standard scientific process of publishing articles (i.e., the peer-review process) remains the best way to get access to high-quality research. Nonetheless, this process may be too long during an emergency like a pandemic. The thoughtful use of other types of network, such as preprint repositories and social media, could be taken into consideration in order to improve the clinical management of COVID-19 patients.

 

New arXivLabs collaboration provides citations in context from scite | arXiv.org blog

“We are happy to announce our arXivLabs collaboration with scite, a new company that is introducing “Smart Citations.” These new citations not only show how many times an article has been cited, but how it has been cited by other publications. This is done by showing the citation context from the citing article, the section of the paper the citation appears in, and whether the citing paper provides supporting or contrasting evidence to the cited claim. These Smart Citations have already been integrated by various publishers and preprint servers to help readers better contextualize and understand research findings.

With this collaboration, arXiv readers can now easily see how millions of preprints have been cited by opening the corresponding scite report. Once on the report, users can quickly read citation statements from each citing paper to see how an article and its findings have been discussed or used, find co-citations, filter by citation types (supporting, contrasting, and mentioning), and more.

To build the tool, scite has processed millions of full-text articles in order to extract and analyze citation statements. To date, scite has analyzed over 26M full-text articles and extracted and analyzed nearly 900M citation statements across a range of disciplines….”

Lessons from arXiv’s 30 years of information sharing | Nature Reviews Physics

“Since the launch of arXiv 30 years ago, modes of information spread in society have changed dramatically — and not always for the better. Paul Ginsparg, who founded arXiv, discusses how academic experience with online preprints can still inform information sharing more generally….”

Strategy and Membership Webinar: Recording now available | arXiv.org blog

“arXiv envisions its future as a central hub for accessing open research, aiming to make its vast scientific content highly accessible and interoperable for the benefit of the community — and to maximize the impact of the research produced. On June 30, 2021, more than 225 people joined arXiv’s Strategy and Membership Webinar to learn how we are working together with our diverse community to reinvent scientific communications. The recording is now available for viewing….”

Adding interactive citation maps to arXiv | arXiv.org blog

“We’re pleased to announce a new arXivLabs collaboration with Litmaps. The new arXivLabs feature allows arXiv users to quickly generate a citation map of the top connected articles, and then explore the citation network using the Litmaps research platform.

A citation network is a visualization of the literature cited by a research paper. The network shows how papers are related to each other in terms of concepts, subject areas, and history — and they’re valuable for analyzing the development of research areas, making decisions on research directions, and assessing the impacts of research, researchers, institutes, countries, and individual papers.

Readers can now view a Litmap citation network for a specific paper, directly from the arXiv abstract page by clicking on the “Bibliographic Tools” tab at the bottom of an abstract page and activating “Litmaps.” Using this tool, arXiv readers can now easily jump from articles they are interested in and use Litmaps’ custom visualization and automated search tools to find other critical articles they may have missed….”

arXiv’s membership program is now based on submissions | arXiv.org blog

“arXiv’s members have provided approximately 25% of our operating budget for the past ten years, supporting arXiv’s mission to provide a reliable open platform for sharing research. By becoming arXiv members, more than 230 institutions around the world have made a strong statement in favor of open access, open science, and sustainable academic publishing. Thank you, members!

We are happy to announce our updated membership program, which was developed in collaboration with the Membership Advisory Board. This program is part of our sustainability model, complements arXiv’s diverse funding sources, including societies and other organizations, and ensures that arXiv will have the funding required to continue meeting researchers’ evolving needs.

arXiv membership is inclusive, flexible, and offers your institution a high value, low-risk, budget-conscious option to serve your scholarly community. Members receive public recognition, institutional usage statistics, eligibility to serve in arXiv’s governance, and more….

Universities, libraries, research institutes, and laboratories are invited to join or renew. For standard memberships, annual fees are based on submissions by institution, averaged over three years….”

Datasets on arXiv. We’re excited to announce our… | by Robert Stojnic | PapersWithCode | May, 2021 | Medium

“We’re excited to announce our partnership with arXiv to support links to datasets on arXiv!

Machine learning articles on arXiv now have a Code & Data tab to link to datasets that are used or introduced in a paper….

This makes it much easier to track dataset usage across the community and quickly find other papers using the same dataset. From Papers with Code you can discover other papers using the same dataset, track usage over time, compare models and find similar datasets….”

arXiv’s Giving Week is May 2 – 8, 2021

“arXiv is free to read and submit research, so why are we asking for donations?

arXiv is not free to operate, and, as a nonprofit, we depend on the generosity of foundations, members, donors, volunteers, and individuals like you to survive and thrive. If arXiv matters to you and you have the means to contribute, we humbly ask you to join arXiv’s global community of supporters with a donation during arXiv’s Giving Week, May 2 – 8, 2021.

Less than one percent of the five million visitors to arXiv this month will donate. If everyone contributed just $1 each, we would be able to meet our annual operating budget and save for future financial stability.

Would you like to know more about our operations and how arXiv’s funds are spent? Check out our annual report for more information….”

Images of the arXiv: Reconfiguring large scientific image datasets | Published in Journal of Cultural Analytics

Abstract:  In an ongoing research project on the ascendancy of statistical visual forms, we have been concerned with the transforma­tions wrought by such images and their organisation as datasets in ‘re­drawing’ knowledge about empirical phenomena.Historians and science studies researchers have long established the generative rather than simply illustrative role of im­ages and figures within scientific practice. More recently, the deployment and generation of images by scientific researchand its communication via publication has been impacted by the tools, techniques, and practices of working with large(image) datasets. Against this background, we built a dataset of 10 million­plus images drawn from all preprint articles deposited in the open access repository arXiv from 1991 (its inception) until the end of 2018. In this article, we suggest ways – including algorithms drawn from machine learning that facilitate visually ’slicing’ through the image data and metadata – for exploring large datasets of statistical scientific images. By treating all forms of visual material found inscientific publications – whether diagrams, photographs, or instrument data – as bare images, we developed methods for tracking their movements across a range of scientific research. We suggest that such methods allow us different entry points into large scientific image datasets and that they initiate a new set of questions about how scientific representatio nmight be operating at more­-than-­human scale.

Images of the arXiv: Reconfiguring large scientific image datasets | Published in Journal of Cultural Analytics

Abstract:  In an ongoing research project on the ascendancy of statistical visual forms, we have been concerned with the transforma­tions wrought by such images and their organisation as datasets in ‘re­drawing’ knowledge about empirical phenomena.Historians and science studies researchers have long established the generative rather than simply illustrative role of im­ages and figures within scientific practice. More recently, the deployment and generation of images by scientific researchand its communication via publication has been impacted by the tools, techniques, and practices of working with large(image) datasets. Against this background, we built a dataset of 10 million­plus images drawn from all preprint articles deposited in the open access repository arXiv from 1991 (its inception) until the end of 2018. In this article, we suggest ways – including algorithms drawn from machine learning that facilitate visually ’slicing’ through the image data and metadata – for exploring large datasets of statistical scientific images. By treating all forms of visual material found inscientific publications – whether diagrams, photographs, or instrument data – as bare images, we developed methods for tracking their movements across a range of scientific research. We suggest that such methods allow us different entry points into large scientific image datasets and that they initiate a new set of questions about how scientific representatio nmight be operating at more­-than-­human scale.