Designing a useful textbook for an open access audience – Q and A with Filipe Campante, Federico Sturzenegger and Andrés Velasco, authors of Advanced Macroeconomics: An Easy Guide? | Impact of Social Sciences

Textbooks play an important role in defining fields of research and summarising key academic ideas for a wider audience. But how do you do this for an open access audience that is potentially unlimited? We talked to Filipe Campante, Federico Sturzenegger and Andrés Velasco¸ authors of the recently published LSE Press book Advanced Macroeconomics: An Easy Guide, about how the field has changed in recent times, what makes their approach to macro-economics distinctive, and what rationales and ambitions lie behind producing an open access textbook.

Open Science, the Social Sciences and the CIVICA Alliance – CIVICA

27 October, 12.00-1.30pm CET

What does Open Science mean in the context of social sciences? What are the drivers and barriers and what does best practice look like? How can the CIVICA alliance promote, support and collaborate on Open Science? These are the questions that will be addressed at this roundtable discussion. Researchers at all levels at CIVICA institutions are invited to join the conversation. Panel discussions will feature contributions from CIVICA Research project coordinators and work package leaders, social science researchers and professional services. The event will be concluded with a summary of current work and future plans for Open Science on the Horizon 2020 funded CIVICA Research project. The event is open to all researchers, students, PhDs and postdocs from the CIVICA alliance

International Survey on Data Sharing and Re-use in Traumatic Stress Research

“The Global Collaboration on Traumatic Stress, a coalition of 11 scientific societies in the field of traumatic stress, is conducting a survey to better understand traumatic stress researchers’ opinions and experiences regarding data sharing and data re-use.

If you are a traumatic stress researcher at any career stage (including trainees) we invite you to share your opinions and experiences by participating in this survey. …”

TRIPLE Conference 2021 “Empowering Discovery in Open Social Sciences and Humanities” November 22-24, 2021.

The goal of the conference is to create space for discussing the impact, benefits and challenges of discovery services for the social sciences and humanities (SSH) in the European research ecosystem.

We would like to bring together members of the Open Science and SSH communities (researchers, university and library staff) as well as other TRIPLE stakeholders such as publishers, science journalists, SMEs, public authorities and policy makers.

Topics include the nascent GoTriple platform – the innovative multilingual and multicultural discovery solution for the SSH –, crowdfunding in science, business models for Open Science and the role of SSH in the European Open Science Cloud (EOSC).

PsyArXiv Preprints | When open data closes the door: Problematising a one size fits all approach to open data in journal submission guidelines

Abstract:  Opening data promises to improve research rigour and democratise knowledge production. But it also poses practical, theoretical, and ethical risks for qualitative research. Despite discussion about open data in qualitative social psychology predating the replication crisis, the nuances of this discussion have not been translated into current journal policies. Through a content analysis of 261 journals in the domain of social psychology, we establish the state of current journal policies for open data. We critically discuss how these expectations may not be adequate for establishing qualitative rigour, can introduce ethical challenges, and may place those who wish to use qualitative approaches at a disadvantage in peer review and publication processes. We assert that open data requirements should include clearer guidelines that reflect the nuance of data sharing in qualitative research, and move away from a universal ‘one-size-fits-all’ approach to data sharing.

 

Hill Museum & Manuscript Library (HMML) Creates New Database to Assist Scholars of Understudied Manuscript Traditions

“The Hill Museum & Manuscript Library (HMML) at Saint John’s University has developed a new database to support and enhance the study of understudied manuscript traditions. Created as part a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), HMML Authority File is an open-access database which establishes accurate and consistent data (“authorities”) for the names of persons, places, works, organizations, and families related to the manuscripts and artwork in HMML Reading Room and HMML Museum, which provide free access to the collections of more than 800 libraries worldwide.”

Humanities Commons Receives $971,000 Mellon Grant to Support Its Expansion – College of Arts & Letters

“Humanities Commons, which is hosted and sustained by Michigan State University and led by Kathleen Fitzpatrick, Director of Digital Humanities for MSU’s College of Arts & Letters, was awarded a $971,000, 5-year grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to support a multi-year restructuring of its business model.

An online open-source platform, Humanities Commons facilitates communication and collaboration among scholars and practitioners across the humanities and around the world. It enables users to engage in discussions across humanities disciplines and to share articles, presentations, and other scholarly materials with their peers and the public. Members also create online professional profiles to help connect with others and to share their work more broadly. …”

The Advanced Research Consortium Joins the Open Library Foundation as Project Member | Open Library Foundation

“The Advanced Research Consortium (ARC) has joined the Open Library Foundation as a Project Member. By joining the Open Library Foundation, ARC is able to leverage the community of projects that are part of the Open Library Foundation.

The Advanced Research Consortium (ARC) serves as a hub of humanities virtual research environments or research nodes. ARC provides support, coordination, and a set of evolving standards for more than 200 digital humanities projects that are open access and peer reviewed by five period-specific and thematic research communities, with more projects and communities joining every year. The ARC Catalog is available through BigDIVA (Big Data Infrastructure Visualization Application), a web-based search and discovery service designed for humanities scholars and students….”

Open and Engaged 2021: Understanding the Impact of Open in the Arts and Humanities Beyond the University – Digital scholarship blog

This blog post was written by Susan Miles, Scholarly Communications Specialist, part of the Research Infrastructure Services team.

In Higher Education contexts, discussions around openness are often focused on the pathways to make publications, data or cultural objects openly available online. It is often not known what impact open resources can have for various communities beyond the research community.

The speakers at Open and Engaged 2021 will explore the different impacts that open resources can have on people. They will seek to question how openness enhances the ability to engage with communities, how projects can be sustainable and make positive changes in the long-term, as well as some of the downsides to current approaches to open engagement.

Many of the speakers come from the GLAM (Galleries, Libraries, Archives and Museums) sector, and we will learn about ways cultural organisations generate, measure and report on impact, and seek useful connections across the higher education and cultural sectors.

This online conference will address key questions of:

How does openness enhance (or restrict) the ability to engage with communities?
What can the higher education sector learn from people involved in research and research-related activities that is conducted outside of universities?
What are some of the ways in which GLAM organisations generate, measure and report on impact?
How can universities work with the wider GLAM sector to enhance the impact of scholarly research?
Are projects geared towards making positive changes in society sustainable?

Programme:

25 October 2021, Monday – British Summer Time (UTC+1)

09:50 – 10:00 Opening remarks

10:00 – 11:00 Session I: Increasing engagement with cultural heritage collections

11:00 – 11:20 Q&A

11:20 – 11:40 Break

11:40 – 12:40 Session II: Measuring and evaluating impact of open resources beyond journal articles

12:40 – 13:00 Q&A

13:00 – 13:05 Closing remarks

Registration Detail:
Registration is free and open now. The sessions will be recorded and made publicly available in November 2021.

Participation:

We encourage you to participate in discussion with other attendees and speakers by using the Twitter hashtag #OpenEngaged. By registering for this conference and participating in the Twitter hashtag, we ask that you treat all organizers, speakers and other participants with respect.

Please email any access requirements or other question to openaccess@bl.uk  

 

Posted by Digital Research Team at 10:00 AM

Tentative Florilegium: Experiments & Recipes for ReWriting Books | Community-led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs (COPIM)

Digital publishing tools and non-restrictive copyright regimes make it possible to incorporate source texts and data in ways that go beyond conventional citation practices, re-assessing the relationships between publications and their sources while providing full attribution. In the summer of 2021, COPIM’s Experimental Publishing Group hosted a mini-workshop series on ReUsing Data and ReUsing Texts to explore this potential. The ReUsing Data workshop experimented with how scholars and new kinds of data books might assemble, relate, expose and perform data differently. 

The ReUsing Texts workshop focused on how scholars might gather, engage, (dis)appropriate, remix and rewrite existing texts. The Combinatorial Books: Gathering Flowers project, set up by COPIM, Open Humanities Press and Gabriela Méndez Cota explores rewriting as a way of writing books. We co-hosted the workshop with Gabriela’s team of scholars, technologists, and students from the Universidad Iberoamericana Ciudad de México and their work inspired the event. Gabriela and her team set out to collaboratively ‘rewrite’ Tondeur and Marder’s book The Chernobyl Herbarium: Fragments of an Exploded Consciousness (Open Humanities Press, 2016).

[…]

Catalyzing a Cultural Renaissance (Consilience Project)

“The Consilience Project is focused on research, publication and the building of a decentralized movement towards enhanced collective intelligence. At the heart of the project is a series of interconnected articles called the Consilience Papers. Once complete, these articles will constitute an open curriculum that covers humanity’s current risk landscape, the inadequacy of existing social institutions, and the theoretical basis of the social technologies of the future. Over the next five years, we will share the ideas within the Consilience Papers through a variety of platforms and provide support to aligned projects and initiatives. Through our growing network, we aim to guide decision-makers, cultural influencers, and eventually everyone in society towards the issues necessary to address the unique challenges of our time.

All of our content is and always will be free and accessible to everyone, because we believe that universal access to high quality information is critical for the functioning of open societies. To protect the quality and integrity of what we do, we will not accept funding from sources that seek any kind of influence through their support. Guided by an ethical framework, we will develop and share the Consilience Papers in order to articulate the potential criteria for the next phase of civilization design. Our aspiration is to help people to develop the knowledge, understanding, and societal awareness needed for a new kind of emergent governance that will increase meaningful quality of life for all.”

HuMetricsHSS Initiative Receives $650,000 Mellon Grant – College of Arts & Letters

“Michigan State University has received a $650,000 grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to continue the work being done by the Humane Metrics for the Humanities and Social Sciences (HuMetricsHSS) initiative, an international partnership committed to establishing more humane indicators of excellence in academia with a particular focus on the humanities and social sciences.  

The goal of the HuMetricsHSS initiative is to empower people at all levels of academic institutions by identifying core values and aligning reward mechanisms in every area — from grades and funding to promotion and tenure — with those values. …”