Game theory and scholarly publishing: premises for an agreement around open access

Actors in research and scientific publishing are gradually joining the Open-Access (OA) movement, which is gaining momentum to become nowadays at the heart of scientific policies in high-income countries. The rise of OA generates profound changes in the chain of production and dissemination of knowledge. Free access to peer-reviewed research methods and results has contributed to the dynamics of science observed in recent years. The modes of publication and access have also evolved; the classic model, based on journal subscriptions is gradually giving way to new economic models that have appeared with the arrival of OA. The objective of this article is twofold. First, propose a model for the publishing market based on the literature as well as on changes in open science policies. Second, analyze publishing strategies of publishers and institutions. To do so, we relied on game theory in economics. Results show that in the short term, the publisher’s equilibrium strategy is to adopt a hybridpublishing model, while the institutions’ equilibrium strategy is to publish in OA. This equilibrium is not stable and that in the medium/long term, the two players will converge on an OA publishing strategy. The analysis of the equilibrium in mixed-strategies confirms this result.

OPERAS report “Future of Scholarly Communication. Forging an inclusive and innovative research infrastructure for scholarly communication in Social Sciences and Humanities” | Zenodo

Avanço, Karla, Balula, Ana, B?aszczy?ska, Marta, Buchner, Anna, Caliman, Lorena, Clivaz, Claire, … Wieneke, Lars. (2021, June 29). Future of Scholarly Communication . Forging an inclusive and innovative research infrastructure for scholarly communication in Social Sciences and Humanities. Zenodo. https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.5017705

 

This report discusses the scholarly communication issues in Social Sciences and Humanities that are relevant to the future development and functioning of OPERAS. The outcomes collected here can be divided into two groups of innovations regarding 1) the operation of OPERAS, and 2) its activities. The “operational” issues include the ways in which an innovative research infrastructure should be governed (Chapter 1) as well as the business models for open access publications in Social Sciences and Humanities (Chapter 2). The other group of issues is dedicated to strategic areas where OPERAS and its services may play an instrumental role in providing, enabling, or unlocking innovation: FAIR data (Chapter 3), bibliodiversity and multilingualism in scholarly communication (Chapter 4), the future of scholarly writing (Chapter 5), and quality assessment (Chapter 6). Each chapter provides an overview of the main findings and challenges with emphasis on recommendations for OPERAS and other stakeholders like e-infrastructures, publishers, SSH researchers, research performing organisations, policy makers, and funders. Links to data and further publications stemming from work concerning particular tasks are located at the end of each chapter.

CFP DHASA 2021 | Digital Humanities Association of Southern Africa | deadline: 22 August

“The Digital Humanities Association of Southern Africa (DHASA) is organizing its third conference with the theme “Digitally Human, Artificially Intelligent”. The field of Digital Humanities is currently still rather underdeveloped in Southern Africa. … By bringing together researchers working on Digital Humanities from Southern Africa or on Southern Africa, we hope to boost collaboration and research in this field….

The DHASA conference is an interdisciplinary platform for researchers working on all areas of Digital Humanities (including, but not limited to language, literature, visual art, performance and theatre studies, media studies, music, history, sociology, psychology, language technologies, library studies, philosophy, methodologies, software and computation, etc.). It aims to create the conditions for the emergence of a scientific Digital Humanities community of practice.

Suggested topics include the following:…

Digital cultural studies, hacker culture, networked communities, digital divides, digital activism, open/libre networks and software, etc.;…

Critical infrastructure studies, critical software studies, media archaeology, eco-criticism, etc., as they intersect with the digital humanities;…

Important dates

Submission deadline: 22 August 2021…

Conference: 29 November 2021 – 3 December 2021…”

 

What is in the EOSC for Arts and Humanities researchers? | DARIAH Open

by Erzsébet Tóth Czifra and Laure Barbot

EOSC (staying for the European Open Science Cloud) is a big acronym, representing the bold vision of enabling all European researchers to deposit, access and analyze scholarly resources beyond borders and disciplines. Over the past years, it has become a central component of European science policy and, since its launch in October 2018, a reality as an infrastructure too. Still, due to the scale, the complexity and the multiple dimensions of the endeavor, it is not easy to gain an accurate overview and translate the offerings of the EOSC into one’s own institution or research setting. In this series of blog posts, we outline concrete ways in which scholarly and service provider communities around DARIAH can interact with the EOSC and the value it holds for them. We also summarize the many ways in which DARIAH already contributes to the EOSC. 

To kick start the series, in the first post we have a look at what the EOSC holds for researchers and, in particular,  Arts and Humanities researchers.

Ouvrir la Science – Guidelines for journals that wish to establish a “data policy” related to their publications

“This document is designed for journals and editorial boards that wish to establish a data policy. A data policy defines what the journal expects from its authors in terms of managing and sharing the data related to its publications.

This document is intended in particular for editors of journals in the humanities and social sciences, as they have been relatively less active in this area than their counterparts in science, technology and medicine. However, it can be useful to all editors, regardless of the disciplinary scope of their journal….”

Online hub for research and teaching brings digital humanities to the fore | MIT News | Massachusetts Institute of Technology

“Computing touches every aspect of teaching and learning at MIT, and the humanities are no exception, with scholars across disciplines using computational tools to answer critical questions in humanistic research. MIT is uniquely positioned to innovate in the digital humanities, with widespread skills in coding and deep engagement in the humanities. Bridging the gap — creating a “bilingual” community, as MIT President L. Rafael Reif calls it — to make connections across diverse research interests will be one key to success.

Now, a new collaboration between the MIT Programs in Digital Humanities (DH Lab) and the MIT Libraries is helping foster relationships among scholars with intersecting interests in computational culture. Since September 2020, the DH Lab has partnered with the libraries to present Digital Teaching and Research Collaborative Sessions, a weekly series of virtual events that provide a regular, informal space for faculty and researchers to connect with DH Lab staff, MIT librarians, and with one another. Recordings of these sessions are now available on the MIT Libraries’ YouTube channel. …”

OPERAS Annual Report 2020 | Zenodo

OPERAS is the Research Infrastructure supporting open scholarly communication in the social sciences and humanities (SSH) in the European Research Area. Its mission is to coordinate and federate resources in Europe to efficiently address the scholarly communication needs of European researchers in the field of SSH.

The OPERAS Annual Report provides a detailed record of the OPERAS AISBL within 2020: News from the OPERAS Assemblies, activieties and projects within 2020.

OPERAS-P project holds Final Meeting at June 29

On June 29, the final meeting of the OPERAS-P project will gather communities to present and discuss the results of the closing project and reflect together on the way forward to make Open Science a reality in the Social Sciences and Humanities. 

The OPERAS-P project has supported the development of the OPERAS research infrastructure by advancing its development in view of achieving its scientific, technical and community maturity. 

The programme of the meeting will include the presentation of the vision, mission and organisation of the OPERAS infrastructure, the role of its national communities, its governance model, its Special Interest Groups, as well as innovation and perspectives for the future – basing on the results from OPERAS-P work – and the building of the infrastructure in a community-driven process. 

The detailed programme is available on the OPERAS blog.

Amsterdam University Press launches new journals platform aup-online.com | Amsterdam University Press

“With the acquisition of 14 journal titles in 2020, adding up to a portfolio of 33 specialised journals in the humanities and social sciences, AUP further professionalizes its academic program by launching a platform that takes digital publishing to the next level….

aup-online.com, developed through publishing platform Ingenta Edify, fully exploits the possibilities of digital search and discovery. In this way, users will quickly find the content they are looking for. Other benefits include integrated SEO optimization (coordinated with Google Scholar), third-party integrations with tools such as Crossref, XML-first publishing options, DOI hyperlinks, and a first-class experience accessing full screen supplementary materials….

Project MUSE introduces AI-based links, powered by UNSILO, for related content

“Project MUSE is partnering with UNSILO, a Cactus Communications (CACTUS) brand that develops artificial intelligence(AI)-powered solutions for publishers, to implement robust new AI-driven content recommendations throughout its massive collection of books and journals in the humanities and social sciences. UNSILO recently completed the initial indexing of the Project MUSE content collection and enhanced related content recommendations appear throughout the platform.

The UNSILO Recommender API automatically identifies links to relevant content from the MUSE content corpus for any selected document (book chapter or journal article). The indexing is updated every 24 hours as new content is added to MUSE. Links are delivered to the platform in real time, enriching the user experience and providing relevance-ranked discovery that augments the learning experience. Over 250 concepts are extracted from every document, and then matched by rank with related material. …”

Welcome to our new open-access publishing platform – The Sociological Review

The Sociological Review, the home for critical sociological thinking and research in the UK and internationally for the past 113 years, has today (8 June 2021) launched an ambitious open-access publishing platform aimed at a broad and diverse global readership.

Save the date: DARIAH Open Access Book Bursary Q&A session

In May 2021, DARIAH-EU launched an annual Open Access Monograph Bursary for the publication of one’s first monograph within the domain of Digital Humanities. This initiative aims to support early career researchers to openly disseminate their first monographs in book series relevant to their field, and thus pave pathways to open research culture for arts and humanities disciplines. The bursary will fund the Open Access publication of one monograph (or other long form of scholarship) per year. 

The call for the 2021 DARIAH Open Access Monograph Bursary is currently open. The deadline for applications is December 6, 2021.

Q&A session – Bring Your Questions

To support applicants and interested researchers, we will host a Q&A information session on the eligibility criteria for participation in the call on the 25th of June at 10:00-11:00 CEST. 

Renowned Digital Humanities Researchers Begin Computing Cultural Heritage in the Cloud | Library of Congress

“Three renowned researchers in digital humanities and computer science are joining forces with the Library of Congress on three inaugural Computing Cultural Heritage in the Cloud projects, exploring how biblical quotations, photographic styles and “fuzzy searches” reveal more about the collections in the world’s largest Library than first meets the eye.

Supported by a $1 million grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation awarded in 2019, the initiative combines cutting edge technology with the Library’s vast collections to support digital humanities research at scale. These three outside researchers will collaborate with subject matter experts and technology specialists at the Library of Congress to experiment in pursuit of answers that can only be achieved with collections and data at scale. These collaborations will enable research on questions previously difficult to address due to technical and data constraints. Expanding the skills and knowledge necessary for this work will enable the Library to support emerging methods in cloud-based computing research such as machine learning, computer vision, interactive data visualization, and other areas of digital humanities and computer science research. As a result, the Library and other cultural heritage institutions may build upon or adapt these approaches for their own use in improving access to text and image collections….”

Qualitative data are shareable – Open Science Future

“Three key learnings:

Sharing qualitative data does not mean depositing them somewhere on the internet.
Sharing qualitative data through data repositories enables controlling secondary use and is safe.
Research data archives offer help in processing data for reuse and some even offer financial support….”

How open access can support Humanities book authors: Interview with Zoe Hope Bulaitis | For Researchers | Springer Nature

“Dr Zoe Hope Bulaitis is author of the open access monograph Value and the Humanities: The Neoliberal University and Our Victorian Inheritance (Palgrave Macmillan, 2020). In this interview, she talks about how open access has supported her goals as a book author, and she provides tips for other authors on how to find open access funding and how to promote their own book….”