Partnership Announcement: Cypris and CORE

“We’re delighted to announce a new partnership between CORE and Cypris, a leading AI-driven, market intelligence platform that connects research & development (R&D) teams with innovation data and trends in their field.

The partnership will provide Cypris with unlimited access to over 210 million open access articles to further enhance their platform and regularly add live market data to provide R&D teams with the most up-to-date research in their fields of interest….”

Archivists Create a Searchable Index of 107 Million Science Articles

“The General Index is here to serve as your map to human knowledge. Pulled from 107,233,728 journal articles, The General Index is a searchable collection of keywords and short sentences from published papers that can serve as a map to the paywalled domains of scientific knowledge.

In full, The General Index is a massive 38 terabyte archive of searchable terms. Compressed, it comes to 8.5 terabytes. It can be pulled directly from archive.org, which can be a difficult and lengthy process. People on the /r/DataHoarder subreddit have uploaded the data to a remote server and are spreading it across BitTorrent. You can help by grabbing a seed here.

The General Index does not contain the entirety of the journal articles it references, simply the keywords and n-grams—a string of simple phrases containing a keyword—that make tracking down a specific article easier. “This is an early release of the general index, a work in progress,” Carl Malamud, the founder of Public.Resource.org and co-creator of the General Index, said in a video about the archive. “In some cases text extraction failed, sometimes metadata is not available or is perhaps incorrect while the underlying corpus is large, it is not complete and it is not up to date.”…”

Journal Checker Tool update: we listen and learn from you | Plan S

“We value feedback from researchers, institutions, funders, and publishers and based on it we always seek to improve the Journal Checker Tool (JCT) to ensure that all users get access to clear advice for Plan S compliance. The latest changes (dated 13th October 2021) include visual modifications, language simplification in the description of results and a new feature to share the results….”

OAreport: Put OA policies into practice in minutes, not months.

“We discover papers and data using open scholarly metadata, targeted text and data mining, and an institution’s internal data sources….

We transparently analyse those papers against all the terms of the institution’s current policy, or custom criteria, to provide detailed statistics and key insights….

We help libraries and funders unlock individual papers as they’re published by making outreach a one-click process, and help build evidence for systemic changes….”

Getty Publications: how Quire is creating solutions to open access publishing – MuseumNext

“In anticipation of MuseumNext’s Digital Collections Summit next week (4-6 October) we caught up with Erine Cecele Dunigan, Community Manager for Quire, an open-source digital publishing tool developed by Getty.

Erin will be giving a talk on Wednesday 6 October entitled, Open Access: Getty’s Approach to Digital Collection Catalogues….

Quire is a modern digital publishing tool developed by Getty. It’s ideal for creating dynamic publications in a variety of formats, including web, print, and e-book. In addition to being optimised for scholarly and visually rich publishing, Quire books are designed for longevity, sustainability, and discoverability.

Getty originally conceived Quire as a solution to its open access publishing needs, but the tool quickly gained the attention of other organisations within the fields of digital humanities, arts, and academia. While access is currently available for free upon request, we will be launching as a fully open-source publishing tool by Spring 2022. Open-sourcing Quire will enable others to leverage the work Getty has done to create, customise, and distribute critical digital scholarship online, at a low cost, and with little ongoing maintenance….”

NASEM Roundtable Releases Open Science Toolkit

It contains modular elements that can be adapted and adopted for a range of use cases, including language for hiring, tenure & promotion, and grantmaking; primers on good practices for openly sharing articles, data, and a number of other resource types, and an Open Science Success Stories Database, which compiles research articles, perspectives, case studies, news stories, and other materials that demonstrate the myriad ways in which Open Science benefits researchers and society alike. Notably, the National Academies is publishing the toolkit under a CC-BY license.

Developing a Toolkit for Fostering Open Science Practices: Public Release Registration, Thu, Sep 30, 2021 at 3:30 PM | Eventbrite

“The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Roundtable on Aligning Incentives for Open Science will host a public release of Developing a Toolkit for Fostering Open Science Practices: Proceedings of a Workshop on Thursday, September 30, 2021 from 3:30-4:30 pm EDT. Please register in advance to receive information on how to participate in the event.”

Developing a Toolkit for Fostering Open Science Practices: Proceedings of a Workshop | The National Academies Press

“The National Academies Roundtable on Aligning Incentives for Open Science, established in 2019, has taken on an important role in addressing issues with open science. The roundtable convenes critical stakeholders to discuss the effectiveness of current incentives for adopting open science practices, current barriers of all types, and ways to move forward in order to align reward structures and institutional values. The Roundtable convened a virtual public workshop on fostering open science practices on November 5, 2020. The broad goal of the workshop was to identify paths to growing the nascent coalition of stakeholders committed to reenvisioning credit/reward systems (e.g., academic hiring, tenure and promotion, and grants)to fully incentivize open science practices. The workshop explored the information and resource needs of researchers, research institutions, government agencies, philanthropies, professional societies, and other stakeholders interested in further supporting and implementing open science practices. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussion of the workshop.”

An Open-Publishing Response to the COVID-19 Infodemic

Abstract:  The COVID-19 pandemic catalyzed the rapid dissemination of papers and preprints investigating the disease and its associated virus, SARS-CoV-2. The multifaceted nature of COVID-19 demands a multidisciplinary approach, but the urgency of the crisis combined with the need for social distancing measures present unique challenges to collaborative science. We applied a massive online open publishing approach to this problem using Manubot. Through GitHub, collaborators summarized and critiqued COVID-19 literature, creating a review manuscript. Manubot automatically compiled citation information for referenced preprints, journal publications, websites, and clinical trials. Continuous integration workflows retrieved up-to-date data from online sources nightly, regenerating some of the manuscript’s figures and statistics. Manubot rendered the manuscript into PDF, HTML, LaTeX, and DOCX outputs, immediately updating the version available online upon the integration of new content. Through this effort, we organized over 50 scientists from a range of backgrounds who evaluated over 1,500 sources and developed seven literature reviews. While many efforts from the computational community have focused on mining COVID-19 literature, our project illustrates the power of open publishing to organize both technical and non-technical scientists to aggregate and disseminate information in response to an evolving crisis.

 

The Code4Lib Journal – Introducing SAGE: An Open-Source Solution for Customizable Discovery Across Collections

Abstract:  Digital libraries at research universities make use of a wide range of unique tools to enable the sharing of eclectic sets of texts, images, audio, video, and other digital objects. Presenting these assorted local treasures to the world can be a challenge, since text is often siloed with text, images with images, and so on, such that per type, there may be separate user experiences in a variety of unique discovery interfaces. One common tool that has been developed in recent years to potentially unite them all is the Apache Solr index. Texas A&M University (TAMU) Libraries has harnessed Solr for internal indexing for repositories like DSpace, Fedora, and Avalon. Impressed by frameworks like Blacklight at peer institutions, TAMU Libraries wrote an analogous set of tools in Java, and thus was born SAGE, the Solr AGgregation Engine, with two primary functions: 1) aggregating Solr indices or “cores,” from various local sources, and 2) presenting search facility to the user in a discovery interface.

 

F-UJI Automated FAIR Data Assessment Tool | FAIRsFAIR

“The F-UJI assessment is based on 16 out of 17 core FAIR object assessment metrics developed within FAIRsFAIR and each corresponding to a part or the whole of a FAIR principle. F-UJI adheres to existing web standards and PID resolution services best practices and utilises external registries and resources such as re3data1 and Datacite2 APIs, SPDX License List3, RDA Metadata Standards Catalog4, and Linked Open Vocabularies (LOV)5   For information on the practical tests implemented against the metrics, see Devaraju, Huber, et al., 2020.

The source code is now available with a free license through Github. Any feedback on improving the tool and associated metrics can be added as an issue on Github. …”

CU Boulder to host ‘Radical Open Access: Experiments in (Post-)Publishing Symposium’ | University Libraries | University of Colorado Boulder

“With the demise of traditional gatekeepers, we are witnessing the rapid rise of alternative modes of both scholarly publishing and distribution as well as the artistic exhibition of computer generated works of art in digital environments. 

The maturation of open access and collaborative platforms are in fact blurring the distinctions between publishing as a significant force of cultural activity in both contemporary art and leading-edge academic venues.

In this context, the symposium will question the current corporatized systems of academic publishing and the commercial-driven art museum and upmarket gallery systems, as well as serve as a forum to interrogate new models of collective action for collaborating on, creating and sharing scholarship and art. Following the symposium will be a “Clinic for Open Source Arts,” for a conversation about open source digital tools for creativity….”

Developing a Toolkit for Fostering Open Science Practices Proceedings of a Workshop Release Event | National Academies

“The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Roundtable on Aligning Incentives for Open Science will host a public release of Developing a Toolkit for Fostering Open Science Practices: Proceedings of a Workshop on Thursday, September 30, 2021 from 3:30-4:30 pm EDT. Please register in advance to receive information on how to participate in the event. 

The forthcoming publication summarizes the presentations and discussion of the virtual workshop held on November 5, 2020 that explored the information and resource needs of researchers, research institutions, research funders, professional societies, and other stakeholders interested in fostering open science practices. The proceedings will includes examples of toolkit elements that have been developed by members of working groups of the Roundtable on Aligning Incentives for Open Science. The toolkit is primarily intended to assist university leadership, academic department chairs, research funders, learned societies, and government agencies for aligning incentives for open science. 

The public release event is expected to highlight the value of an open science toolkit, National Academies engagement with open science, and an overview of the toolkit elements, followed by brief case studies presented by members of the community that show how the toolkit can be adapted and adopted. ”