Plan S Journal Comparison Service: open for publishers to register and deposit price and service data | Plan S

cOAlition S is excited to release today the Journal Comparison Service (JCS), a secure, free and long-anticipated digital service, that aims to shed light on publishing fees and services.

Starting from today, publishers can register with the JCS publisher portal. After signing a service agreement, publishers can share information, at journal level, highlighting the services they provide and the prices they charge in line with one of the Plan S approved price and service transparency frameworks. These data are then made available to librarians via a secure online system.  Examples of data that will be made available through the service include information about the publication frequency, the peer review process, times from submission to acceptance, the range of list prices for APCs, subscription prices, and how the price is allocated over a defined set of services.

 

Managing open access publication workflows and compliance | Jisc

“Higher education institutions must manage open access funds, track research outputs across the publication lifecycle, as well as meeting funders’ open research policies.?These resource intensive activities pose challenges across the sector. Our new product tackles this head on….

The product will include a publication database, reporting suite, transitional agreement log, analytics dashboard, and more. It will provide a platform that centralises major workflow components and streamlines open access management….”

Monitoring and reporting on open research: a new product in the making

“This year, the open research services team at Jisc have started developing a product for reporting and monitoring open access publications. This new platform will centralise key workflows and streamline open access management to help save time and resource.

At this interactive virtual event, we will introduce you to this product in the making, taking you through its key features including a reporting suite, analytics dashboard, transitional agreement log, research outputs database, along with automated data integration from trusted sources.

Most importantly, we want to hear your opinions to make sure our plans continue to align with your workflow needs….”

Solving medicine’s data bottleneck: Nightingale Open Science | Nature Medicine

“Open datasets, curated around unsolved medical problems, are vital to the development of computational research in medicine, but remain in short supply. Nightingale Open Science, a non-profit computing platform, was founded to catalyse research in this nascent field….”

An Open-Publishing Response to the COVID-19 Infodemic – PMC

Abstract:  The COVID-19 pandemic catalyzed the rapid dissemination of papers and preprints investigating the disease and its associated virus, SARS-CoV-2. The multifaceted nature of COVID-19 demands a multidisciplinary approach, but the urgency of the crisis combined with the need for social distancing measures present unique challenges to collaborative science. We applied a massive online open publishing approach to this problem using Manubot. Through GitHub, collaborators summarized and critiqued COVID-19 literature, creating a review manuscript. Manubot automatically compiled citation information for referenced preprints, journal publications, websites, and clinical trials. Continuous integration workflows retrieved up-to-date data from online sources nightly, regenerating some of the manuscript’s figures and statistics. Manubot rendered the manuscript into PDF, HTML, LaTeX, and DOCX outputs, immediately updating the version available online upon the integration of new content. Through this effort, we organized over 50 scientists from a range of backgrounds who evaluated over 1,500 sources and developed seven literature reviews. While many efforts from the computational community have focused on mining COVID-19 literature, our project illustrates the power of open publishing to organize both technical and non-technical scientists to aggregate and disseminate information in response to an evolving crisis.

Open Research Knowledge Graph

“The Open Research Knowledge Graph (ORKG) aims to describe research papers in a structured manner. With the ORKG, papers are easier to find and compare….

Research is a fundamental pillar of societal progress. Yet, scientific communities face great difficulties in sharing their findings. With approximately 2.5 million newly published scientific articles per year, it is impossible to keep track of all relevant knowledge. Even in small fields, researchers often find themselves drowning in a publication flood, contributing to major scientific crises such as the reproducibility crisis, the deficiency of peer-review and ultimately the loss of knowledge.

The underlying problem is that we never updated our methods of scholarly communication to exploit the possibilities of digitalization. This is where the Open Research Knowledge Graph comes into play!

The ORKG makes scientific knowledge human- and machine-actionable and thus enables completely new ways of machine assistance. This will help researchers find relevant contributions to their field and create state-of-the-art comparisons and reviews. With the ORKG, scientists can explore knowledge in entirely new ways and share results even across different disciplines….”

Data tools for achieving disaster risk reduction: An analysis of open-access georeferenced disaster risk datasets – World | ReliefWeb

“The priorities of the Sendai Framework are to (1) understand disaster risk; (2) strengthen disaster risk governance to manage risk; (3) invest in disaster risk reduction and resilience; and (4) enhance the capacity to recover from disasters (UNDRR, 2015). This study advances our knowledge of implementing the Sendai Framework from publications that have utilized open-access spatial data and issues common to Framework implementation. The findings from a literature review reveal that many of the problems cited by recent work are data-related.

This study engages with these issues and discusses how they could be addressed by those who have a vested interest in disaster risk reduction, from policymakers to community members.”

Recommendations for Discipline-Specific FAIRness Evaluation Derived from Applying an Ensemble of Evaluation Tools

Abstract:  From a research data repositories’ perspective, offering research data management services in line with the FAIR principles is becoming increasingly important. However, there exists no globally established and trusted approach to evaluate FAIRness to date. Here, we apply five different available FAIRness evaluation approaches to selected data archived in the World Data Center for Climate (WDCC). Two approaches are purely automatic, two approaches are purely manual and one approach applies a hybrid method (manual and automatic combined).

The results of our evaluation show an overall mean FAIR score of WDCC-archived (meta)data of 0.67 of 1, with a range of 0.5 to 0.88. Manual approaches show higher scores than automated ones and the hybrid approach shows the highest score. Computed statistics indicate that the test approaches show an overall good agreement at the data collection level.

We find that while neither one of the five valuation approaches is fully fit-for-purpose to evaluate (discipline-specific) FAIRness, all have their individual strengths. Specifically, manual approaches capture contextual aspects of FAIRness relevant for reuse, whereas automated approaches focus on the strictly standardised aspects of machine actionability. Correspondingly, the hybrid method combines the advantages and eliminates the deficiencies of manual and automatic evaluation approaches.

Based on our results, we recommend future FAIRness evaluation tools to be based on a mature hybrid approach. Especially the design and adoption of the discipline-specific aspects of FAIRness will have to be conducted in concerted community efforts.

The Public Knowledge Project’s Open Monograph Press

While much progress has been made by academic libraries, societies, and groups of scholars in supporting the publication of independent journals, giving rise to the Open Access Diamond Journal phenomenon (no charge for authors or readers), the same is not true of books.1  Scholarly books would appear to require a publishing house to produce such works.  Well, in that regard, Open Monograph Press (OMP) offers a publishing house in a box.  Only there is no box.  And the house is virtual, but within it one can see the scholarly book through to publication.

pubassistant.ch: consolidating publication profiles of researchers – PubMed

“Online accounts to keep track of scientific publications, such as Open Researcher and Contributor ID (ORCID) or Google Scholar, can be time consuming to maintain and synchronize. Furthermore, the open access status of publications is often not easily accessible, hindering potential opening of closed publications. To lessen the burden of managing personal profiles, we developed a R shiny app that allows publication lists from multiple platforms to be retrieved and consolidated, as well as interactive exploration and comparison of publication profiles. A live version can be found at pubassistant.ch.

New OpenAlex API features! – OurResearch blog

“We’ve got a ton of great API improvements to report! If you’re an API user, there’s a good chance there’s something in here you’re gonna love.

Search

You can now search both titles and abstracts. We’ve also implemented stemming, so a search for “frogs” now automatically gets your results mentioning “frog,” too. Thanks to these changes, searches for works now deliver around 10x more results. This can all be accessed using the new search query parameter.

 

New entity filters

We’ve added support for tons of new filters, which are documented here. You can now:

get all of a work’s outgoing citations (ie, its references section) with a single query. 
search within each work’s raw affiliation data to find an arbitrary string (eg a specific department within an organization)
filter on whether or not an entity has a canonical external ID (works: has_doi, authors: has_orcid, etc) ….”

Full article: Emergence of New Public Discovery Services: Connecting Open Web Searchers to Library Content

Abstract:  A growing number of new public citation databases, available free of charge and accessible on the open web, are offering researchers a new place to start their searching, providing an alternative to Google Scholar and library resources. These new “public discovery services” index significant portions of scholarly literature, then differentiate themselves by applying technologies like artificial intelligence and machine learning, to create results sets that are promoted as more meaningful, easier to navigate, and more engaging than other discovery options. Additionally, these new public discovery services are adopting new linking technologies that connect researchers from citation records to full text content licensed on their behalf by their affiliated libraries. With these new sites logging millions of sessions a month, they present unique opportunities for libraries to connect to researchers working outside the library and challenges in how the library can make itself obvious in the user workflow.

 

VuFind® Joins the Open Library Foundation | Open Library Foundation

“VuFind® has joined the Open Library Foundation. The open source library discovery tool was developed at Villanova University and is maintained by an international development community that has been coordinated by staff at the University’s Falvey Memorial Library since 2007. VuFind is joining the foundation in order to ensure the long-term sustainability of VuFind, which is used by hundreds of libraries around the world.

By joining the Open Library Foundation, VuFind will benefit from infrastructure support including legal, operational, administrative, and financial resources. The foundation is also able to ensure that VuFind is owned by the VuFind community and is able to expand beyond the interests of any single entity….”