The Canadian Open Neuroscience Platform—An open science framework for the neuroscience community | PLOS Computational Biology

Abstract:  The Canadian Open Neuroscience Platform (CONP) takes a multifaceted approach to enabling open neuroscience, aiming to make research, data, and tools accessible to everyone, with the ultimate objective of accelerating discovery. Its core infrastructure is the CONP Portal, a repository with a decentralized design, where datasets and analysis tools across disparate platforms can be browsed, searched, accessed, and shared in accordance with FAIR principles. Another key piece of CONP infrastructure is NeuroLibre, a preprint server capable of creating and hosting executable and fully reproducible scientific publications that embed text, figures, and code. As part of its holistic approach, the CONP has also constructed frameworks and guidance for ethics and data governance, provided support and developed resources to help train the next generation of neuroscientists, and has fostered and grown an engaged community through outreach and communications. In this manuscript, we provide a high-level overview of this multipronged platform and its vision of lowering the barriers to the practice of open neuroscience and yielding the associated benefits for both individual researchers and the wider community.

 

Mid-summer reflections on our five years’ journey…

“OA Switchboard has been live as operational solution since 1 January 2021 (17 consortia and multi-site participants, 154 institutions, 31 publishers, more than 5,100 ‘organisations’, over half a million ‘messages’), supporting two use cases for journal article publications and a variety of business models, including non-APC based models. It operates a sustainable governance and funding model via Stichting (‘foundation’) OA Switchboard, founded by OASPA in October 2020. Security and privacy is ensured via technology and contracts. All participants in OA Switchboard sign the same Service Agreement that the General Terms & Conditions are an integral part of….”

eLife and PREreview to enhance the ‘publish, review, curate’ ecosystem through adoption of COAR Notify | For the press | eLife

“eLife and PREreview are pleased to announce that the Confederation of Open Access Repositories (COAR) will provide them with technical and funding support to implement the COAR Notify technology. With this support, the organisations will work to connect separate services within the ‘publish, review, curate’ ecosystem.

The project will put in place the basic infrastructure and protocols needed for all-round and standardised connections between preprint repositories, community-led preprint review platforms, journals, and preprint review aggregation and curation platforms. The aim is to lower existing technological and cost barriers so that as many of these services as possible can more easily participate in the ‘publish, review, curate’ future for research….”

eLife and PREreview to enhance the ‘publish, review, curate’ ecosystem through adoption of COAR Notify | For the press | eLife

“eLife and PREreview are pleased to announce that the Confederation of Open Access Repositories (COAR) will provide them with technical and funding support to implement the COAR Notify technology. With this support, the organisations will work to connect separate services within the ‘publish, review, curate’ ecosystem.

The project will put in place the basic infrastructure and protocols needed for all-round and standardised connections between preprint repositories, community-led preprint review platforms, journals, and preprint review aggregation and curation platforms. The aim is to lower existing technological and cost barriers so that as many of these services as possible can more easily participate in the ‘publish, review, curate’ future for research….”

Springer Nature continues open research drive with acquisition of protocols.io | Springer Nature Group | Springer Nature

“Springer Nature, the world’s leading publisher of protocols, has acquired protocols.io – a secure platform for developing and sharing reproducible methods.

Scientific advancement depends on data credibility and work that can be verified, built upon and reproduced. Sharing  all elements of research, including data, methods and materials, and even negative results, makes research more  efficient, enables reproducibility and therefore builds trust in science. Studies show that lack of awareness of existing work or negative results leads to unnecessary duplication and could waste up to €26 billion in Europe alone. 

By laying out detailed step-by-step instructions for research methods, aiming to standardise the process, ensure accuracy of results and enabling research to be reproduced, protocols have a vital role to play in addressing this. With protocols.io joining Springer Nature’s leading protocol offering, researchers will now have the option to make their protocols openly available on the protocols.io platform (fully OA)  as well as publishing them in peer-reviewed publications (searchable via the Springer Nature Experiments)….”

Comparing different search methods for the open access journal recommendation tool B!SON | SpringerLink

Abstract:  Finding a suitable open access journal to publish academic work is a complex task: Researchers have to navigate a constantly growing number of journals, institutional agreements with publishers, funders’ conditions and the risk of predatory publishers. To help with these challenges, we introduce a web-based journal recommendation system called B!SON. A systematic requirements analysis was conducted in the form of a survey. The developed tool suggests open access journals based on title, abstract and references provided by the user. The recommendations are built on open data, publisher-independent and work across domains and languages. Transparency is provided by its open source nature, an open application programming interface (API) and by specifying which matches the shown recommendations are based on. The recommendation quality has been evaluated using two different evaluation techniques, including several new recommendation methods. We were able to improve the results from our previous paper with a pre-trained transformer model. The beta version of the tool received positive feedback from the community and in several test sessions. We developed a recommendation system for open access journals to help researchers find a suitable journal. The open tool has been extensively tested, and we found possible improvements for our current recommendation technique. Development by two German academic libraries ensures the longevity and sustainability of the system.

Wikipedia’s Moment of Truth – The New York Times, 18 July 2023

“…In late June, I began to experiment with a plug-in the Wikimedia Foundation had built for ChatGPT. At the time, this software tool was being tested by several dozen Wikipedia editors and foundation staff members, but it became available in mid-July on the OpenAI website for subscribers who want augmented answers to their ChatGPT queries. The effect is similar to the “retrieval” process that Jesse Dodge surmises might be required to produce accurate answers. GPT-4’s knowledge base is currently limited to data it ingested by the end of its training period, in September 2021. A Wikipedia plug-in helps the bot access information about events up to the present day. At least in theory, the tool — lines of code that direct a search for Wikipedia articles that answer a chatbot query — gives users an improved, combinatory experience: the fluency and linguistic capabilities of an A.I. chatbot, merged with the factuality and currency of Wikipedia….”

https://web.archive.org/web/20230718101549/https://www.nytimes.com/2023/07/18/magazine/wikipedia-ai-chatgpt.html

COAR Notify: overview of year one – COAR

“The COAR Notify Initiative is developing and accelerating community adoption of a standard, interoperable, and decentralised approach to linking research outputs hosted in the distributed network of repositories with resources from external review services. COAR Notify was launched in 2021, and was awarded a significant grant from Arcadia, a charitable foundation that works to protect nature, preserve cultural heritage and promote open access to knowledge, in 2022. As of June 30, 2023, we marked the end of the first year of the Arcadia-funded project, which has significantly accelerated our progress on several fronts: …”

 

Samvera Europe 2023 meeting Tickets, Mon 11 Sep 2023 at 11:00 | Eventbrite

“The Samvera Europe group provides a forum for members of the international Samvera Community within Europe to meet and engage around our use of Samvera and related technologies as well as discuss, as Samvera’s purpose states, “…making the world’s digital collections accessible now and into the future”.

In 2023, we will be meeting again, post-pandemic, in person, kindly hosted by the British Library in London on Monday 11th September. Please join us and find out all about current and future use of Samvera….”

Join the OA.Report for libraries pilot to simplify compliance checking for your institutional & funder’s OA policies.

“Today, we’re happy to announce that you can join the OA.Report for libraries pilot! If you’re interested in joining: read on and get in touch! 

OA.Report is an open-source tool that identifies research outputs organizations have supported, analyzes their openness (including OA policy compliance), and then streamlines taking action to make results more open.”

 

OA.Report now free for thousands of funders to analyze and increase their impact using open research

“Today, we’re releasing free public OA.Reports for thousands of major research funders to help discover publications they’ve funded, understand how open their research is, and increase the impact of their investments. This release is an important milestone for OA.Report, which was developed in partnership with the Gates Foundation and is currently in use at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Wellcome, the Michael J. Fox Foundation, and other major foundations.”

 

Gorilla Experiment Builder – Easily Create Online Behavioural Experiments

“Online research is a fast-growing field and we’re committed to facilitating high quality research and open science. An overview of Gorilla is presented in our Behavior Research Methods paper, Gorilla in our midst: An online behavioral experiment builder. We have also published a peer-reviewed large-scale study of timing accuracy across platforms, web-browsers and devices.

In our desire to make life easier for researchers, and as supporters of Open Science practices, Gorilla includes an open access repository for sharing research materials.  Explore Gorilla Open Materials to discover and clone a wide range of tasks, questionnaires and experiments shared by our users.”

How to Promote the Discoverability of Research at Your Organization

“In this webinar, product specialists from the Center for Open Science (COS) will discuss the free, open-source software platform Open Science Framework (OSF) and the specialized suite of tools that we offer research organizations for more visibility into and support of their community’s open scholarship practices. We welcome research coordinators, funders and research administrators to join us in exploring how OSF Collections might be a helpful tool for your research community. …”

 

MJFF starts using OA.Report to measure OA policy compliance & demonstrate its impact | Jun 26, 2023

“We’re thrilled to share that The Michael J.Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research (MJFF) has signed up to use OA.Report to help implement its Open Access Policy. OA.Works currently supports Aligning Science Across Parkinson’s (ASAP) open access policy implementation, and through ASAP’s partnership with MJFF and collaborative discussions, OA.Works and MJFF agreed to work together on open access policy implementation. Some areas we’re especially excited for OA.Report to support include: Tracking the research they’re funding, and producing open data that can be used to demonstrate the foundation’s impact to the public via their scientific publications page. Accurately assessing their Open Access Policy…”