The Code4Lib Journal – Introducing SAGE: An Open-Source Solution for Customizable Discovery Across Collections

Abstract:  Digital libraries at research universities make use of a wide range of unique tools to enable the sharing of eclectic sets of texts, images, audio, video, and other digital objects. Presenting these assorted local treasures to the world can be a challenge, since text is often siloed with text, images with images, and so on, such that per type, there may be separate user experiences in a variety of unique discovery interfaces. One common tool that has been developed in recent years to potentially unite them all is the Apache Solr index. Texas A&M University (TAMU) Libraries has harnessed Solr for internal indexing for repositories like DSpace, Fedora, and Avalon. Impressed by frameworks like Blacklight at peer institutions, TAMU Libraries wrote an analogous set of tools in Java, and thus was born SAGE, the Solr AGgregation Engine, with two primary functions: 1) aggregating Solr indices or “cores,” from various local sources, and 2) presenting search facility to the user in a discovery interface.

 

Research Solutions Unveils Article Galaxy Version 3.0 – In a Time When Rapid Scientific Research is Crucial – Aug 12, 2021

“Highlights of Article Galaxy 3.0:

Search and access more than 100 million articles with one click. A redesigned interface and more robust search functionality connects researchers to the insight they need and the content providers they trust, making it easier to discover and manage content.
Identify whether an article is already owned or accessible. Enhanced knowledge sharing helps researchers make smarter article purchasing decisions and reduces acquisition costs. Researchers can see whether the company already purchased an article, if a subscription to the source exists, or if the article is available via open access….”

APIv3: Announcing a new API to access CORE data – Research

“Since the start (10 years ago!) CORE’s mission has been to aggregate and facilitate access to open access scientific research at an unprecedented scale to both humans and machines. To achieve this aim, we are always refining and improving our methods for access and use of the CORE data. …

We are now delighted to bring our users further developments to the CORE services and announce the new CORE APIv3. The full details of the new API can be found in the documentation and you can register for a key in this URL. 

 

Below is  a quick overview of the new features in APIv3….”

Google Dataset Search: Using open access tools during the research process – News – Illinois State

“We often discuss publications and publishing open access (OA) materials in these news items, but the OA movement can be a part of many other steps of the research process. Many researchers choose to make the datasets their research is based on open access as well. This can be done as part of a funding institution’s requirements, to increase transparency and reproducibility, or simply because they wish to make their data easily available to other researchers.

One way students and faculty can find these datasets is through Google Dataset Search. Out of beta in early 2020, Google Dataset Search can be used to find links to datasets that have been published on the web and described via the schema.org standard. The internet does not include all datasets, and not all are described using this standard, but Google does claim that over 25 million datasets are indexed for searching….”

PubAg

“PubAg Basics

PubAg is the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), National Agricultural Library’s (NAL) search system for agricultural information. It is available for free on the Internet at: https://pubag.nal.usda.gov/. PubAg is part of the AGRICOLA family of products.
PubAg contains full-text articles relevant to the agricultural sciences, along with citations to peer-reviewed journal articles with links to publisher sites and elsewhere for full-text access.
PubAg’s citations have been enriched through subject analysis and application of terms from NALT (NAL’s Agricultural Thesaurus).
PubAg searching is accomplished by entering your terms in the search box and clicking the Search button. Search suggestions are provided to assist searching.
When multiple terms are entered with no connector, they will be combined in the search with an implicit “AND”.
Using the drop-down menu you can narrow your search of PubAg to terms in the following fields: Title, Author, Subject, or Journal. The default setting is to search “All Fields.”…”

Un thésaurus trilingue de la science ouverte dans Loterre (A trilingual open science thesaurus in Loterre)

From Google’s English:

“This is the objective that Inist wishes to achieve with its “? Open science thesaurus?” which has just been posted on its Loterre terminology platform ?: https://www.loterre.fr/skosmos/TSO/fr /

The terminological engineering department of Inist initiated this work by relying on existing glossaries in this field and on the open science taxonomy resulting from the FOSTER project. The terminological resource was then enriched thanks to a search of reference documents in the field.”

Preprints 101 for authors

“Preprints enable researchers to rapidly share their work publicly before the formal peer review process. In this webinar you will learn more about preprints and their benefits for the research community from ASAPbio; will hear an author’s perspective on posting preprints from Sumeet Pal Singh, a group leader at IRIBHM, ULB; and will find out how to incorporate preprints in your literature search routine by using the preprint discovery tools developed by Europe PMC.”

Open search tools need sustainable funding – Research Professional News

“The Covid-19 pandemic has triggered an explosion of knowledge, with more than 200,000 papers published to date. At one point last year, scientific output on the topic was doubling every 20 days. This huge growth poses big challenges for researchers, many of whom have pivoted to coronavirus research without experience or preparation.

Mainstream academic search engines are not built for such a situation. Tools such as Google Scholar, Scopus and Web of Science provide long, unstructured lists of results with little context.

These work well if you know what you are looking for. But for anyone diving into an unknown field, it can take weeks, even months, to identify the most important topics, publication venues and authors. This is far too long in a public health emergency.

The result has been delays, duplicated work, and problems with identifying reliable findings. This lack of tools to provide a quick overview of research results and evaluate them correctly has created a crisis in discoverability itself. …

Building on these, meta-aggregators such as Base, Core and OpenAIRE have begun to rival and in some cases outperform the proprietary search engines. …”

Next Steps for Microsoft Academic – Expanding into New Horizons | Microsoft Research

TLDR:

Microsoft Academic Website: No longer accessible after Dec. 31, 2020,
Microsoft Academic Graph: No longer providing updated data or access to old releases after Dec. 31, 2021; however, existing copies can still be used under license.

Microsoft Academic has been on a mission to explore new ways to empower researchers and research organizations to achieve more. The research project is characterized by two sets of technologies: one that reads all the Bing-indexed web pages and organizes the most up-to-date academic knowledge into a knowledge base called Microsoft Academic Graph (MAG), and the other that performs semantic reasoning and inference to serve that knowledge through the Microsoft Academic search website and API. We are proud that these data and web services have been found useful in numerous research projects around the world, and excited to see more community-driven, public efforts emerge.

One question that we are asked frequently, though, is how the technologies powering Microsoft Academic can be used by institutions outside of academia to make organizational knowledge more discoverable and accessible. Over the years, we have openly shared some of the building blocks, such as the language and network similarity packages, and the core search engine MAKES.  With the continued progress in data access, we believe now is the right time to fully explore opportunities to extend this technology to new industries and transition to community approaches for academic research.

Microsoft Research will continue to support the automated AI agents powering Microsoft Academic services through the end of calendar year 2021. During this time, we encourage existing Microsoft Academic users to begin transitioning to other equivalent services. Below are just a few of the many great options available to the community.

Aminer
CrossRef
Dimensions
lens.org
OpenCitations
Scopus
Semantic Scholar

Thank you very much for the years of support and encouragement. We are immensely grateful to have learned and grown from your feedback over the years. As we are passing the torch to the community-driven efforts, we invite you to join us in continuously contributing ideas and suggestions to nurture, embrace, and grow these platforms.

 

WordPress Saves Creative Commons Search Engine From Shutting Down

“Creative Commons Search is joining WordPress.org, which will help keep the search engine of free-to-use images running for the foreseeable future.

Matt Mullenweg, CEO of WordPress parent company Automattic, says he decided to bring CC Search on board after hearing it was in danger of shutting down….”

New Advanced Search Functionalities! – ScienceOpen Blog

“On the ScienceOpen platform, the search engine that powers our discovery database is unique in that it is front and center on each new search—without any barricades, inviting all users to tinker with and explore content with it. Excitingly, the ScienceOpen technical team has recently upgraded the search functionalities on the site to be even more advanced and user-friendly! …”

NIH Preprint Pilot Update. NLM Technical Bulletin. 2021 Mar–Apr

“Ten months into the NIH Preprint Pilot, more than 2,100 preprints reporting NIH-supported research on COVID-19 are now discoverable in PubMed Central (PMC) and PubMed. Through early April 2021, these records have been viewed more than 1 million times in each of these databases (1.4 million in PMC; 1 million in PubMed). Of the preprints included in the pilot, ~60% are currently discoverable only as a preprint version, having not yet been linked to a published article. All articles are clearly identified as preprints. Preprints may be selected or excluded in searches by using the preprint filter.

The pilot launched in June 2020 with preprint records from medRxiv, bioRxiv, arXiv, ChemRxiv, Research Square, and SSRN. Phase 1 has focused on improving the discoverability of preprints relating to the ongoing public health emergency and accelerating dissemination of NIH-supported research on the SARS-CoV-2 virus and COVID-19. This narrowly scoped first phase has allowed the National Library of Medicine (NLM) to streamline curation and ingest workflows for NIH-supported preprints and refine the details of implementation with a set of articles for which there has been high demand for accelerated access and discovery. Since launching the pilot, NLM has made display of preprint records in PubMed search results more transparent. We have also automated checks for new preprint versions and preprint withdrawals, and reduced the steps required to report preprints as products of awards in My Bibliography….”