Open Science FAIR – Open Science Knowledge Graphs: Transforming the Way we Manage, Explore, and Analyze Scientific Knowledge

“In this workshop, SciLake representatives will elaborate on the mission of building a comprehensive scholarly communication graph and the technical solutions under development. Representatives from key ESFRIs will present their ongoing work on the creation and maintenance of domain-specific SKGs, their current needs and identified challenges. By exploring the initiatives of these projects, we aim to provide insights into the usage of SKGs in Open Science activities and the impact they have on research output and collaborations….”

Job Posting: pyOpenSci is Hiring a Community Manager – pyOpenSci

“pyOpenSci is accepting applications for a Community Manager. The Community Manager supports growth and development of an inclusive pyOpenSci community. Our vibrant community is dedicated to supporting high quality Python open source software that drives open science.”

Skills4EOSC Fellowship Programme Call Now Open: Join the Future of Open Science!

“The first call for the Skills4EOSC Fellowship Programme is now open and accepting applications until October 31, 2023. This initiative is a part of the Skills4EOSC Horizon Europe project and aims to support data experts in the field of Open Science, FAIR data, and research data management. If you’re a data professional passionate about Open Science and want to contribute to its advancement, this is your opportunity. The Fellowship Programme offers short secondments that allow you to work closely with one of 12 participating institutions, gaining valuable skills and being part of the dynamic Open Science community. For comprehensive information about the Fellowship Programme and details on how to apply, please visit our dedicated page: Skills4EOSC Fellowship Programme Call.”

Survey of open science practices and attitudes in the social sciences | Nature Communications

Abstract:  Open science practices such as posting data or code and pre-registering analyses are increasingly prescribed and debated in the applied sciences, but the actual popularity and lifetime usage of these practices remain unknown. This study provides an assessment of attitudes toward, use of, and perceived norms regarding open science practices from a sample of authors published in top-10 (most-cited) journals and PhD students in top-20 ranked North American departments from four major social science disciplines: economics, political science, psychology, and sociology. We observe largely favorable private attitudes toward widespread lifetime usage (meaning that a researcher has used a particular practice at least once) of open science practices. As of 2020, nearly 90% of scholars had ever used at least one such practice. Support for posting data or code online is higher (88% overall support and nearly at the ceiling in some fields) than support for pre-registration (58% overall). With respect to norms, there is evidence that the scholars in our sample appear to underestimate the use of open science practices in their field. We also document that the reported lifetime prevalence of open science practices increased from 49% in 2010 to 87% a decade later.

 

Building more equity and inclusion with DataCite’s Global Access Fund

“DataCite is thrilled to launch a Global Access Fund (GAF; https://datacite.org/global-access-fund.html), established to enable organizations worldwide to make their research outputs discoverable. It will provide financial support for outreach activities and infrastructure development to enable more organizations to benefit from DataCite infrastructure services. The GAF is part of the DataCite Global Access Program (GAP) made possible by grant Grant 2022-316573 from the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative (https://chanzuckerberg.com/). Applications are open to non-profit stakeholders within the research ecosystem (e.g. research institutions, associations, NRENs, government bodies, service providers) based in Africa, Latin America, the Middle East, and Asia.

Join us for this informative session to learn about: – The scope, eligibility and timeline of the fund – How to apply and to get support during the process – The evaluation and selection criteria There will be plenty of time for Q&A….”

DataCite launches Global Access Fund with support from CZI

“DataCite is thrilled to launch the Global Access Fund (GAF), established to enable organizations worldwide to make their research outputs discoverable. It will provide financial support for both outreach activities and infrastructure development to enable organizations in regions and communities currently underrepresented in the global open science infrastructure landscape to benefit from DataCite infrastructure services.The GAF is part of the DataCite Global Access Program (GAP) made possible by Grant 2022-316573 from the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative….”

TU Delft and CODECHECK Hackathon

“Are you interested in reproducible code and Open Science? Then we have the perfect opportunity for you!

As part of a pilot project between TU Delft and CODECHECK, we are organising a codechecking hackathon on 18th September 2023! During this hackathon, you will learn the concept behind codechecking, and practise related skills to check whether available code and data can reproduce the results in a paper, preprint or project. More information about the codechecking process can be found here.

Would you like to participate as a codechecker, and help promote reproducible code and Open Science? Register via this page, and save the date! The hackathon will take place over two sessions, in the morning and afternoon. Details of the programme will be released in early September.

Familiarity with a current programming or data analysis language (e.g., R, Python, JavaScript, Julia) is beneficial.

PhD candidates at TU Delft are eligible for 0.5 Graduate School credits, provided they attend the entire session (morning and afternoon), and write a short reflection (between 300-350 words) on the skills they learned during the codechecking session, to be uploaded on their DMA profiles. To confirm their eligibility for GS credits, PhD candidates must seek approval from their supervisors and their Faculty Graduate Schools in advance of the session. If confirmation of attendance is required from the organisers, please let us know beforehand….”

PsyArXiv Preprints | ReproduceMe: lessons from a pilot project on computational reproducibility

Abstract:  If a scientific paper is computationally reproducible, the analyses it reports can be repeated independently by others. At the present time most papers are not reproducible. However, the tools to enable computational reproducibility are now widely available, using free and open source software. We conducted a pilot study in which we offered ‘reproducibility as a service’ within a UK psychology department for a period of 6 months. Our rationale was that most researchers lack either the time or expertise to make their own work reproducible, but might be willing to allow this to be done by an independent team. Ten papers were converted into reproducible format using R markdown, such that all analyses were conducted by a single script that could download raw data from online platforms as required, generate figures, and produce a pdf of the final manuscript. For some studies this involved reproducing analyses originally conducted using commercial software. The project was an overall success, with strong support from the contributing authors who saw clear benefit from this work, including greater transparency and openness, and ease of use for the reader. Here we describe our framework for reproducibility, summarise the specific lessons learned during the project, and discuss the future of computational reproducibility. Our view is that computationally reproducible manuscripts embody many of the core principles of open science, and should become the default format for scientific communication.

Scholarly communication’s response to the climate crisis and the role of open science – OASPA

“OASPA is pleased to announce this month’s webinar which will focus on the role that different actors in scholarly communication can play to address climate change – one of the world’s most pressing challenges. While climate change is a complex issue there are very real and impactful actions that researchers, librarians and publishers can take to help generate solutions to climate change though open access.

The webinar will be chaired by Monica Granados (Creative Commons). We welcome our panelists: Vincent Lariviere (l’Université de Montréal) who will present his findings Contrasting the open access dissemination of COVID-19 and SDG research and Kris Karnauskas (University of Colorado Boulder) who will speak from the perspective of a researcher and why the research he works on needs to be open. A third panelist is in the process of being confirmed and will conclude the talks.

The panellists will each speak for 10 minutes, and then we will open it up to questions from the audience and discussion.

This webinar is an opportunity for registrants to reflect on what they could do to advance open access to climate research and plan some actions (e.g. opening up fundamental papers, publish new research openly, raise awareness among researchers, engage library community, amongst others).”

Scholarly communication’s response to the climate crisis and the role of open science

“OASPA is pleased to announce this month’s webinar which will focus on the role that different actors in scholarly communication can play to address climate change – one of the world’s most pressing challenges. While climate change is a complex issue there are very real and impactful actions that researchers, librarians and publishers can take to help generate solutions to climate change though open access.

The webinar will be chaired by Monica Granados (Creative Commons). We welcome our panelists: Vincent Lariviere (l’Université de Montréal) who will present his findings Contrasting the open access dissemination of COVID-19 and SDG research and Kris Karnauskas (University of Colorado Boulder) who will speak from the perspective of a researcher and why the research he works on needs to be open. A third panelist is in the process of being confirmed and will conclude the talks. The panellists will each speak for 10 minutes, and then we will open it up to questions from the audience and discussion. This webinar is an opportunity for registrants to reflect on what they could do to advance open access to climate research and plan some actions (e.g. opening up fundamental papers, publish new research openly, raise awareness among researchers, engage library community, amongst others).”

Community of Practice on Open Science and Responsible Research Assessment – GraspOS

“In bimonthly conversations, research funders, research managers, researchers and anyone interested in these topics come together to discuss the multiple ways in which research assessment considers Open Science. Our guests tell stories about issues, frustrations and the successes of research assessment in relation to Open Science. The goal of this community is to create a bouquet of stories of translation from which we can learn and draw inspiration for our own research assessments.”

Upgrading Scientific Dialogue – Astera

“To explore new solutions, we need the most talented builders and entrepreneurs to lead. Astera’s new Science Entrepreneur-in-Residence (EIR) program will support innovators who urgently want to unlock new tools for scientific publishing.

Selected Science EIRs will carry out the first phase of their work in residence at Astera. We will consider a proposed budget of up to $500,000 to cover compensation and resources for the EIR, including other potential teammates. Science EIRs with high-potential ideas and demonstrable excellence in execution during the first year will be eligible to pitch a spin-out organization or company. For promising directions, Astera will provide additional resources of up to approximately $2M as an investment or donation, depending on the nature of the project.

In addition to financial support, Astera’s Science EIR program will also provide guidance for builders as they envision and test actionable, out-of-the-box ideas. We will pair Science EIRs with scientists and other advisors who are embedded in research and open science. We believe that learning and building together with these partners will be critical for understanding user needs and incorporating historical lessons….”

Unblocking Scientific Publishing – Astera

“A cornerstone of scientific progress is how scientific results are shared and discussed across research communities, i.e. publishing. It shapes our collective thinking, the pace of iteration, and even dictates who is able to participate. Astera is launching a series of ambitious funding programs over the next few years to catalyze new publishing tools that make scientific exchange faster and easier. We will prioritize strategies that leverage cutting-edge technologies and address challenges in scaling. New, creative solutions for exchanging scientific information at scale could not only address existing bottlenecks in scientific publishing but also transform what is possible for scientific progress.

Astera would like to spur innovation in scientific publishing by funding a new Science EIR program. We are currently focused on the life sciences. As we search for the most talented technologists, builders, and entrepreneurs to step into the fray, we are also looking for ideas from the broader community on how we can best direct their skills and efforts. We want to hear from people who are embedded in scientific research, open science, or tool development for scientific publishing….”