Readings for Open Access Week 2022 · Peter Suber | October 2022

“Open Access Week 2022 is coming up, October 24-30. This year’s theme is Open for Climate Justice. I hope you’ll find good moments to talk with colleagues about OA. To me, that’s the main purpose of OA Week. If you can’t talk every week with colleagues about OA, then use OA Week as an excuse. Before the pandemic, you could talk from a stage, your office, their office, a hallway, sidewalk, or café table. Now use Zoom or your favorite Zoom alternative. The effectiveness matters more than the setting, and informal personal settings are almost always more effective than formal impersonal ones. Make the case in a way that your colleagues will understand, which you understand because you’re their colleague. Lead with direct conversation, not readings. Take advantage of the give and take of conversation. Show that you can answer your colleagues’ actual concerns. Show that you can answer the frequently heard questions, objections, and misunderstandings that might come up along the way. Help your colleagues understand that there’s a serious problem and a beautiful solution….”

OA Weeks past, but not forgotten – The Official PLOS Blog

“Open Access (OA) Week is a time that’s dear to our hearts at PLOS. PLOS is a proud co-founder of OA Week. Back in 2008, PLOS alumna Donna Okubo, helped to organize an OA Day, together with representatives from SPARC and Students for Free Culture. Based on the success of that event, the group decided to expand OA Day to a full week the following year. OA Week is also an unofficial birthday of sorts, coinciding as it does with the first issues of our first journals: PLOS Biology in October 2003, and PLOS Medicine in October 2004 (plus PLOS NTDs in October 2007, and PLOS Global Public Health in October 2021).

The Open movement has grown and changed a lot over the past 14 years. Through it all PLOS has remained at the forefront of Open, exemplifying the themes of each celebration—almost like they were tailor-made, just for us. Let’s take a look back at highlights from those past celebrations, and a look ahead at where we think the Open movement is headed next….”

What can COVID-19 teach us about making research on climate change open access?

“This year, during the International Open Access Week, the focus is on Open for Climate Justice. In this panel discussion, open access experts will reflect on key lessons emerging from the COVID-19 pandemic on the publication of critical research open access. They will discuss how these can inform the approach to dealing with the climate change crisis better from different perspectives: stressing on the urgency for open access to climate research, adopting approaches to make OA publication of climate research sustainable, and addressing issues related to research/publication ethics and potential misinterpretation of research findings.

Attend the session till the end to be eligible for a certificate of participation….”

Transition to Open Access: Tackling Complexity and Building Trust – Publishing Perspectives

“This spring, Copyright Clearance Center (CCC) presented a special “OA Innovation Seminar Series.” On behalf of Publishing Perspectives, Christopher Kenneally revisited comments from two guests who appeared in this series and are seeing positive outcomes in their transitions to open access….”

Environmental Justice Wikipedia Editathon – LibCal – Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis

“On Tuesday, November 1, 2022 from 11:00am-4:00pm EST IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute along with IUPUI Library and IU Bloomington Libraries will be hosting an editing event around global environmental justice.

During the event we will discuss research and issues related to environmental justice and offer a Wikipedia editing training session. Following training, we will work together to improve and create articles about environmental justice and related issues. Speakers will begin at 11am sharp! …”

Open Access Keynote! Open Climate Campaign: Social Justice through Better Sharing – LibCal – University of Colorado Boulder

“Climate change — and the resulting harm to global biodiversity — is one of the world’s most pressing challenges. We can already see how the climate crisis compounds social injustice around the world. When knowledge about climate change and biodiversity is not freely and openly available to all, only part of humanity is able to help build on that knowledge. When only some people are able to contribute to that knowledge, new insights and possible solutions are missing. Learn how Creative Commons, SPARC, and EIFL have launched a 4-year global Open Climate Campaign to mobilize researchers, national governments, funders, and environmental organizations to open access to knowledge so better sharing can accelerate progress to solve the climate crisis, preserve global biodiversity, and expand social justice.”

Open Access Week 2022 | Open Access Australasia

“Open Access Australasia acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of country throughout Australia and their connections to land, sea and community. We pay our respect to their Elders past and present and extend that respect to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Open Access Australasia recognises the Awabakal, Turrbal and Yugara, and Bedegal as the First Nations owners of the lands where we work.

We also pay our respects to all indigenous peoples wherever they are in the world including ng? iwi, M?ori the tangata whenua of Aotearoa New Zealand.

This year’s Open Access week theme seeks to encourage connection and collaboration among the climate movement and the international open community. Sharing knowledge is a human right, and tackling the climate crisis requires the rapid exchange of knowledge across geographic, economic, and disciplinary boundaries.  Register for the events below and make sure to save our OA Week 2022 Zoom backgrounds to use for the events….”
 

Seeking Environmental Justice in Philadelphia: Creating a Path for all Voices – LibCal – Penn Libraries

“The Reeves family has worked over generations to ameliorate harms and create opportunities in Grays Ferry, a predominantly Black community directly next to the refinery’s old north yard. As part of their efforts to demand a more just future for their families and community in the wake of the final refinery explosion in 2019, Mr. and Mrs. Charles and Tammy Reeves have partnered with PPEH to share their perspectives on living with a refinery through the sharing of oral histories (collected in Schuylkill River & Urban Waters Research Corps Archive’s Grays Ferry Oral Histories Project) and through collaboration with visual artist Amy Balkin….

This event recognizes International Open Access Week October 24-29, which this year has the theme, Open for Climate Justice. Tonight’s event is sponsored by the Penn Libraries and the Penn Program in Environmental Humanities. …”

Seeking Environmental Justice in Philadelphia: Creating a Path for all Voices – LibCal – Penn Libraries

“The Reeves family has worked over generations to ameliorate harms and create opportunities in Grays Ferry, a predominantly Black community directly next to the refinery’s old north yard. As part of their efforts to demand a more just future for their families and community in the wake of the final refinery explosion in 2019, Mr. and Mrs. Charles and Tammy Reeves have partnered with PPEH to share their perspectives on living with a refinery through the sharing of oral histories (collected in Schuylkill River & Urban Waters Research Corps Archive’s Grays Ferry Oral Histories Project) and through collaboration with visual artist Amy Balkin….

This event recognizes International Open Access Week October 24-29, which this year has the theme, Open for Climate Justice. Tonight’s event is sponsored by the Penn Libraries and the Penn Program in Environmental Humanities. …”

Panel: Open Access and Climate Justice | UCSB Library

“Please join UCSB Library and punctum books in celebrating International Open Access Week by attending a panel discussion with scholars in the Humanities, Social Sciences, Sciences, and Arts. Three UCSB researchers and two guest scholars will discuss how their work intersects with, directly addresses, and/or is impacted by climate change, and how they perceive the mission of climate justice in their work. Climate justice is an explicit acknowledgment that sharing knowledge and resources, such as access to water and higher ground when the oceans rise, is a human right, and tackling the climate crisis requires the rapid and open exchange of knowledge across geographic, economic, and disciplinary boundaries.

In addition to sharing their research, our panelists will offer perspectives on power imbalances affecting scholarly communities’ abilities to produce, disseminate, and use knowledge around the climate crisis. They will also address the question of how openness in research can create pathways to more equitable knowledge sharing and address the inequities that shape the impacts of climate change and our response to them.”

Panel: Open Access and Climate Justice | UCSB Library

“Please join UCSB Library and punctum books in celebrating International Open Access Week by attending a panel discussion with scholars in the Humanities, Social Sciences, Sciences, and Arts. Three UCSB researchers and two guest scholars will discuss how their work intersects with, directly addresses, and/or is impacted by climate change, and how they perceive the mission of climate justice in their work. Climate justice is an explicit acknowledgment that sharing knowledge and resources, such as access to water and higher ground when the oceans rise, is a human right, and tackling the climate crisis requires the rapid and open exchange of knowledge across geographic, economic, and disciplinary boundaries.

In addition to sharing their research, our panelists will offer perspectives on power imbalances affecting scholarly communities’ abilities to produce, disseminate, and use knowledge around the climate crisis. They will also address the question of how openness in research can create pathways to more equitable knowledge sharing and address the inequities that shape the impacts of climate change and our response to them.”

Open for Climate Justice: Conversations with Columbia Climate School – Columbia University Events Calendar

“The term “climate justice” reflects an explicit acknowledgement that the climate crisis has far-reaching impacts that are most often felt by communities with relatively few resources. These same communities often lack the means and the access needed to produce, disseminate, and use knowledge around the climate crisis. Openness in research on climate cancreate pathways to more equitable knowledge sharing and serve as a means to address the inequities that shape the impacts of climate change and our response to them. This panel discussion will highlight how “openness” factors into the work of Columbia researchers and their connections with the climate justice movement….”

 

Stricter requirements for science to be open access – Stockholm University Library

“The demands on research data and science results to be open access are intensified. But how does it work in practice? During this year’s Open Access Week, which runs from 24-30 October, the issue is in focus.

That tax funded research should be open access is a common goal in the political sphere as well as at the Swedish universities. Of the 3,868 peer-reviewed scientific articles published at Stockholm University in 2021, 87 percent were published with open access in some form. But the goal is 100 percent.

And with a new policy for open science, Stockholm University is gearing up the transition to an open scientific system. The same development takes place in the rest of the world, most recently in the United States where the White House recently decided that federally funded research should be made open access immediately upon publication.

– It is interesting that the United States is now following Europe and what the EU is doing, and is setting strict requirements for open access to data, articles and books. It changes the game plan for us in relation to the scientific publishers, says Wilhelm Widmark, Senior Advisor to the President with operational responsibility for Open Science at the university. …”