If publishers have their way, libraries’ digital options will see major cuts | The Hill

“To many, controlled digital lending might sound obscure and disconnected from their own lives, and to be honest, I can see why. After all, controlled digital lending is based on the finer points of well-established U.S. copyright law — loaning books to people — it’s not something a lot of library patrons pay attention to. Moreover, when it’s working seamlessly, it’s a bit like one of those apps that runs unobtrusively in the background of your computer’s operating system. Patrons only notice it when it slows or stops working.  

If a pending lawsuit by major American book publishers challenging its legal limits succeeds, controlled digital lending’s absence might be a lot more noticeable to a lot more people. It will be harder to borrow digital books and other materials from the growing number of libraries that practice controlled digital lending or some form of it.

Combine that with other efforts by book publishers to curb access to digital content and there are troubling consequences for how an information-based society like ours continues to drive economic, social and political progress….”

Applying Subscribe to Open to Scholarly Books – SPARC

“On May 26th at 11am ET / 8am PT, SPARC will host a webcast in partnership with the Subscribe to Open (S2O) Community of Practice to discuss how S2O, a conditional open access revenue model, is being used to support the open dissemination of scholarly books. The 90-minute session will cover the perspectives of publishers currently using conditional open access offers for books, authors who have published their books openly, and libraries that have committed to supporting this model. The webcast will seek to highlight both the increasing opportunities to support S2O models for books and the benefits of doing so for authors and for libraries.”

CEU Press OA monograph library membership model – free webinar for CRL

“FREE WEBINAR. CRL have partnered with Central European University (CEU) Press to offer subscriptions to curated packages of the Press’ extensive backlist on the history, culture and politics of Central and Eastern Europe and Russia, including the transitions to democracy. The packages are DRM-free and libraries get perpetual access after a membership period of three years. Membership subscription revenue is used by the Press to produce new frontlist books in Open Access (OA) format, freely accessible to anyone. Shortlisted in 2021 for an ALPSP Innovation in Publishing Award, we call the scheme Opening the Future.

CEU Press and project-partner COPIM are hosting a free webinar on Tuesday, May 24th from 10am – 11am (PST) to talk about their journey in flipping to open, and to talk though the packages of backlist books on offer. The webinar will also offer Q&A. There is more information available in advance, including a more detailed pricing breakdown, on eDesiderata. 

Open Access Monographs: Making Mandates Reality Tickets, Thu 23 Jun 2022 at 14:00 | Eventbrite

“This half-day webinar galvanises a much-needed sector-wide conversation on OA monographs in the context of the UK’s policy landscape. Expert panels of speakers from the library, publishing and policy worlds will outline the current state-of-play and discuss how we can move to meet the imminent OA mandates from cOAlition S/Plan S in Europe and UKRI in the UK, and potential implications of the REF.

Featuring expert speakers from UKRI (Rachel Bruce) and Jisc (Caren Milloy), the event will open with a discussion of monograph policies and mandates before moving to an academic viewpoint from Professor Martin Eve (Birkbeck, University of London) who will talk about various international OA funding models and the need to move quickly from pilot phases to business as usual.

The second half of the session will highlight the challenges of getting OA metadata into supply chains and systems often designed for closed books, and will discuss the concomitant challenges posed by metrics and reporting on OA books (speakers TBC). The afternoon will close with a view from the library perspective and expert speakers from the libraries at the Universities of York (Sarah Thompson), Aberdeen (Simon Bains) and Imperial College (Chris Banks). There will be time for Q&A after each set of speakers….”

COPIM & RLUK webinar: Open Access Monographs: Making Mandates Reality, Thu 23 Jun 2022 at 2pm (BST)

A COPIM webinar in partnership with RLUK

About this event:This half-day webinar galvanises a much-needed sector-wide conversation on OA monographs in the context of the UK’s policy landscape. Expert panels of speakers from the library, publishing and policy worlds will outline the current state-of-play and discuss how we can move to meet the imminent OA mandates from cOAlition S/Plan S in Europe and UKRI in the UK, and potential implications of the REF.

Featuring expert speakers from UKRI (Rachel Bruce) and Jisc (Caren Milloy), the event will open with a discussion of monograph policies and mandates before moving to an academic viewpoint from Professor Martin Eve (Birkbeck, University of London) who will talk about various international OA funding models and the need to move quickly from pilot phases to business as usual.

The second half of the session will highlight the challenges of getting OA metadata into supply chains and systems often designed for closed books, and will discuss the concomitant challenges posed by metrics and reporting on OA books (speakers TBC). The afternoon will close with a view from the library perspective and expert speakers from the libraries at the Universities of York (Sarah Thompson), Aberdeen (Simon Bains) and Imperial College (Chris Banks). There will be time for Q&A after each set of speakers.

This will be a crucial webinar for academic library colleagues and anyone involved in academic book publishing who is interested to know how the sector will meet the challenges of open access monographs. Candid discussion on OA book publishing – between libraries, publishers, funders and infrastructure providers – is urgently needed. Register to join the discussion.

 

Leistungen und Kostenrahmen für zeitgemäße Open-Access-Publikationen in den Geistes- und Sozialwissenschaften: Vorschlag für eine Differenzierung von Open-Access-Gebühren verlagstypischen Leistungen entsprechend

From Google’s English:  Abstract:  This paper is to be understood as the interim result of an exchange that has been ongoing since April 2020 within the AG Open Access Financing of the Enable! community. The authors are pursuing the intention of making the services and the associated cost framework for open access book publications transparent and comprehensible in order to accelerate the open access transformation. The paper cannot and should not be considered a recommendation by the Enable! community, but rather a substantial contribution to the discussion. The authors emphasize that the costs for individual work steps and areas mentioned below vary both from publication to publication and between the publishers represented here. The 300-page average book modeled here is the result of a methodical reduction for the purpose of better illustration. Some points remain unanswered in the current state of discussion, these are namely the question of the publisher’s profit and the calculation approach to be taken as a basis for this.

Collaborating for Access: Book Challenges in a Digital World

“In this third in our Collaborating for Access series of webinars hosted by COSLA, DPLA, and ReadersFirst, we’ll look at what the current political environment of increased book challenges means for digital content. What opportunities are available for libraries to use digital materials to maintain access, and in what ways are digital content and the libraries providing it open to unique attacks across the political spectrum? We’ll bring together a panel of librarians and thought leaders to discuss the ramifications of challenges in the digital world and look at potential solutions digital access may provide.”

What Does My Library Need to Know about Ebook Laws? | American Libraries Magazine

“Minow and guest author Kyle K. Courtney discuss the library ebooks landscape and state-level efforts to institutionalize fair licensing terms….

In the short term, publishers and ebook aggregators are preventing libraries from acquiring ebooks with fair licensing (or purchasing) terms that would allow libraries to adequately provide continual access to them. Current ebook licenses offered to libraries come with many restrictions on use, are often prohibitively expensive, and sometimes are not available at any price.

In the long term, libraries do not own but lease ebook titles, which affects collection development and services like interlibrary loan and preservation as there are no legal terms in the licenses to make them a permanent part of the library collection….”

Open Access Books: do we need a Plan S moment? – Digital Science

To judge from the progress of Open Access (OA) journal articles, you could be mistaken for thinking OA was the new paradigm for all research: a swift look at the charts below tells you everything you need to know.

According to Unpaywall and Dimensions, one by one the disciplines have tipped from majority-closed to majority-open. Life Sciences was the first to tip in 2013; Medical and Health Sciences followed in 2016; then the Social Sciences and Physical and Mathematical Sciences in 2017. The Humanities joined the majority open in 2020; and Engineering and Technology were at parity in 2021.

So what of books? While we can say with confidence that rates of OA publishing for both monographs and collected works have doubled over the last 10 years, the proportion of OA books remains very low, barely troubling the dominance of the traditional pay model. It’s possible to see a small increase in the last two years – which could be a consequence of more publishers making books ‘freely available’ during COVID (but, lacking a CC- licence not matching the formal status of being ‘Open Access’). Whether or not this trend continues, in a post-pandemic world, is a question that we’ll need to return to in 2024…

 

How the Open Book Collective works | Community-led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs (COPIM)

by Livy Onalee Snyder and Joe Deville

The Open Book Collective (OBC) is a non-profit membership organization that brings together Open Access (OA) publishers, service providers, librarians, and other supporters to collectively bring about a fairer, more sustainable model of open book publishing. 

Through the OBC’s online platform, publishers and service providers offer individual and collective membership packages which libraries and other potential supporters can pay to join.

[…]

 

The Bookseller – News – Emerald Publishing partners with Knowledge Unlatched for e-book collection

“Emerald Publishing has partnered with Knowledge Unlatched (KU) to create and promote an Open Access e-book collection in business management and economics. 

The exclusive deal starts from 2023 and is the first Open Access partnership of its kind for the publisher within its e-books portfolio.  

All book titles in the “Emerald Publishing – Responsible Management and the SDGs” package will also focus on responding to and achieving the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), with a particular focus on SDGs on decent work and economic growth; industry, innovation and infrastructure; and responsible consumption and production. 

Titles will cover themes such as diversity, inclusion and gender and racial equity in the workplace, sustainable tourism and ending forced labour, and how businesses of all sizes are working towards SDGs. …”

New OSC resource to support book authors interested in open access publishing – Office of Scholarly Communication

The UC Office of Scholarly Communication has created a new resource for faculty who have questions about open access book publishing. Created by a working group that included faculty, librarians, and a representative from UC Press, the newly created OA books FAQ is intended to address some questions that faculty may have about their OA publishing options and provide links to additional resources that will help faculty navigate this landscape.

Open Boek: online leesclub voor informatieprofessionals

From Google’s English:  “Keeping up with our professional knowledge is not only done by reading trade journals, blogs and/or books. Conversations about this with each other are also important. And it is precisely at this point that the time or opportunity is often lacking. That is why as a professional organization we want to start an online reading club under the name: OPEN BOOK, because we believe in the open sharing of knowledge. The works discussed are also available open access. During each meeting we discuss one publication on a theme within our beautiful field.

The topic of open access publishing is central to the new meeting OPEN BOEK , the online reading club for information professionals . We discuss the following article:

Jeroen Bosman, Hans de Jonge, Bianca Kramer and Jeroen Sondervan, ‘ Advancing Open Access in the Netherlands after 2020: From Quantity to Quality ‘ Working Paper, January 21, 2021. …”

Arning et al. (2022) Open Access Transformation for Books: The Role of Institutional Presses and Publishing Services | Zenodo

Arning, Ursula, Bargheer, Margo, Meinecke, Isabella, Schobert, Dagmar, & Tobias, Regine. (2022). Open Access Transformation for Books: The Role of Institutional Presses and Publishing Services. Zenodo. https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.6346271

This position paper highlights important aspects for the Open Access transformation of books. The five authors are all experts in the field of institutional publication infrastructures. They show current fields of action and scope for research institutions in the field of non-commercial infrastructures for OA books.