First OA book published by OtF press | Community-led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs (COPIM)

COPIM and our partner presses hit a big milestone this week- the first book funded by our library membership programme is published today, with 5 more titles in the pipeline. You can read and download the book here: https://muse.jhu.edu/book/97875 

Central European University (CEU) Press announced today the publication of a new academic monograph for specialist and general readers. It is the first of their ‘open access’ books funded entirely by the university library members of the Opening the Future programme. This book is freely available worldwide to read and download from Project MUSE, and will also be on other open access platforms like OAPEN. (It’s also available to buy in print).

Textbook publishers sue Shopify over alleged ‘massive’ IP violations | Reuters

“Major educational publishers on Wednesday accused e-commerce company Shopify of enabling rampant piracy in a lawsuit filed in Virginia federal court.

Macmillan Learning, Cengage Learning Inc, Elsevier Inc, McGraw Hill LLC and Pearson Education Inc said Canada-based Shopify turned a blind eye to repeat notices that its users sell pirated digital textbooks and other materials, allowing for copyright and trademark infringement “on a massive scale.”

The publishers asked the court for statutory damages of up to $150,000 per infringed copyright and $2 million for each counterfeited trademark, and listed more than 3,400 copyrights that users allegedly violated….”

Wiley Acquires Open Access Innovator Knowledge Unlatched | Open Research Community

Sven Fund, Managing Director, Knowledge Unlatched

Dear global KU-Community,

After much careful consideration, I have decided to accept an offer from Wiley to sell Knowledge Unlatched. As KU operates at a very special intersection in the publishing environment, it is important to me personally that you should understand the motivation behind this second change in ownership in the company’s history.

[…]

More readers in more places: the benefits of open access for scholarly books

Open access to scholarly contents has grown substantially in recent years. This includes the number of books published open access online. However, there is limited study on how usage patterns (via downloads, citations and web visibility) of these books may differ from their closed counterparts. Such information is not only important for book publishers, but also for researchers in disciplines where books are the norm. This article reports on findings from comparing samples of books published by Springer Nature to shed light on differences in usage patterns across open access and closed books. The study includes a selection of 281 open access books and a sample of 3,653 closed books (drawn from 21,059 closed books using stratified random sampling). The books are stratified by combinations of book type, discipline and year of publication to enable likewise comparisons within each stratum and to maximize statistical power of the sample. The results show higher geographic diversity of usage, higher numbers of downloads and more citations for open access books across all strata. Importantly, open access books have increased access and usage for traditionally underserved populations.

More readers in more places: the benefits of open access for scholarly books

Abstract:  Open access to scholarly contents has grown substantially in recent years. This includes the number of books published open access online. However, there is limited study on how usage patterns (via downloads, citations and web visibility) of these books may differ from their closed counterparts. Such information is not only important for book publishers, but also for researchers in disciplines where books are the norm. This article reports on findings from comparing samples of books published by Springer Nature to shed light on differences in usage patterns across open access and closed books. The study includes a selection of 281 open access books and a sample of 3,653 closed books (drawn from 21,059 closed books using stratified random sampling). The books are stratified by combinations of book type, discipline and year of publication to enable likewise comparisons within each stratum and to maximize statistical power of the sample. The results show higher geographic diversity of usage, higher numbers of downloads and more citations for open access books across all strata. Importantly, open access books have increased access and usage for traditionally underserved populations.

 

Direct to Open Enables the MIT Press to Publish Its Full List of Spring 2022 Monographs and Edited Collections Open Access

The MIT Press today announced that it has reached the fifty percent threshold for participation in the Direct to Open (D2O) initiative, an innovative sustainable framework for open access monographs. Thanks to the early support of participating institutions, the full list of spring 2022 scholarly monographs and edited collections from the MIT Press will now be published open access. The D2O commitment window has also been extended through June 30, 2022.

Citizen Science Skilling for Library Staff, Researchers, and the Public, published by the LIBER Citizen Science Working Group

Part of the four part book series: Citizen Science for Research Libraries — A Guide

Section Editor Jitka Stilund Hansen

#CS4RL

An open access and peer-reviewed book. © 2021 the authors. Licensed Creative Commons: Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-SA 4.0), unless otherwise stated.

ISBN Print: 978-87-94233-59-0
ISBN eBook: 978-87-94233-60-6

DOI: https://doi.org/10.25815/hf0m-2a57

A practical guide designed to assist those organising and participating in a citizen science project to get the most out of the experience. The guide will enable you to have the skills to ensure a project is well set up from the start, is able to communicate to its stakeholders and citizens, manage its data and outputs, and overall ensure research benefits. The guide has been compiled by the LIBER Citizen Science Working Group and pulls on the generous contributions of the open science community.

Toward Open Research: A Narrative Review of the Challenges and Opportunities for Open Humanities | Journal of Communication | Oxford Academic

Abstract:  Open research represents a new set of principles and methodologies for greater cooperation, transparent sharing of findings, and access to and re-use of research data, materials or outputs, making knowledge more freely available to wider audiences for societal benefit. Yet, the future success of the international move toward open research will be dependent on key stakeholders addressing current barriers to increase uptake, effectiveness, and sustainability. This article builds on “An Agenda for Open Science in Communication,” raising dialog around the need for a broader view of open research as opposed to open science through a deeper understanding of specific challenges faced by the humanities. It reviews how the multifaceted nature of humanities research outputs make open communication formats more complex and costly. While new avenues are emerging to advance open research, there is a need for more collaborative, coordinated efforts to better connect humanities scholars with the communities they serve.

 

Outrage as Pearson increase ebook prices by 500% in one week | #ebooksos – campaign to investigate the academic ebook market

#ebooksos were dismayed to learn yesterday that Pearson Education UK intend to increase the price of their ebooks by 500% on December 6th. Pearson were one of the few publishers with ebook prices that mirrored their hardcopy prices. Librarians are now faced with just a week to review their Pearson ebook licence holdings before the huge price rise. With many libraries having budgeted for the year ahead already, the timing of this increase pulls the rug from under the feet of those ever more thinly spread budgets

As Calls to Ban Books Intensify, Digital Librarians Offer Perspective – Internet Archive Blogs

“The Internet Archive’s Open Library (https://openlibrary.org) does not face the same local pressures that many school districts or school libraries do. At a time when students and teachers may be encountering limited access to content in their local community, the Internet Archive acquires and digitizes material for its online library, and lends a wide array of books for free to anyone, anytime. For example, the American Library Association’s list of most challenged books in the past decade are available in a curated collection. Among the titles: The Glass Castle by Jennette Walls, banned for offensive language and sexually explicit content; The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins, cited as being insensitive, anti-family and violent; and Beyond Magenta: Transgender Teens Speak Out by Susan Kuklin, challenged for its LGBTQIA content and the perceived effects on young people who would read it….”

OA Mythbusters episode 3 – YouTube

“John Sherer, Director of The University of North Carolina Press, US busting one of the myths about OA books: Open Access means I can no longer receive royalties from my book.

John Sherer is Director of the University of North Carolina Press (UNC Press). UNC Press also runs Longleaf Services, providing cost-effective fulfilment services for university presses. Longleaf Services also participates in a couple foundation funded initiatives including the Next Generation Library Publishing Project supported by the Arcadia Fund. Longleaf Services also leads the Sustainable History Monograph Pilot (SHMP) which is funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation which is publishing lots of open access history monographs from over 20 university presses.”